Industrial pollution

Larry Poell, who lives on top of a Superfund site in Mead, Neb., adjusts Wednesday, March 27, 2019, the overalls of his granddaughter, while visiting a flood relief shelter in Ashland. Poell said federal officials have always maintained that the contaminated plumes are stable, but he wonders if the floodwater caused them to shift. "I'm concerned about it, I think everybody's concerned about it," he said. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
March 28, 2019 - 1:43 pm
MEAD, Neb. (AP) — Flooding in the Midwest temporarily cut off a Superfund site in Nebraska that stores radioactive waste and explosives, inundated another one storing toxic chemical waste in Missouri, and limited access to others, according to federal regulators. The Environmental Protection Agency...
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Larry Poell, who lives on top of a Superfund site in Mead, Neb., adjusts Wednesday, March 27, 2019, the overalls of his granddaughter, while visiting a flood relief shelter in Ashland. Poell said federal officials have always maintained that the contaminated plumes are stable, but he wonders if the floodwater caused them to shift. "I'm concerned about it, I think everybody's concerned about it," he said. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
March 28, 2019 - 11:48 am
MEAD, Neb. (AP) — Flooding in the Midwest temporarily cut off a Superfund site in Nebraska that stores radioactive waste and explosives, inundated another one storing toxic chemical waste in Missouri, and limited access to others, federal regulators said Wednesday. The Environmental Protection...
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Larry Poell, who lives on top of a Superfund site in Mead, Neb., adjusts Wednesday, March 27, 2019, the overalls of his granddaughter, while visiting a flood relief shelter in Ashland. Poell said federal officials have always maintained that the contaminated plumes are stable, but he wonders if the floodwater caused them to shift. "I'm concerned about it, I think everybody's concerned about it," he said. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
March 28, 2019 - 11:26 am
MEAD, Neb. (AP) — Flooding in the Midwest temporarily cut off a Superfund site in Nebraska that stores radioactive waste and explosives, inundated another one storing toxic chemical waste in Missouri, and limited access to others, federal regulators said Wednesday. The Environmental Protection...
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FILE - This Sept. 21, 2017, file photo shows the Environmental Protection Agency building in Washington. Flooding in the Midwest temporarily cut off a Superfund site in Nebraska that stores radioactive waste and explosives, inundated another one storing toxic chemical waste in Missouri, and limited access to others, the EPA said Wednesday, March 27, 2019. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
March 27, 2019 - 9:55 pm
MEAD, Neb. (AP) — Flooding in the Midwest temporarily cut off a Superfund site in Nebraska that stores radioactive waste and explosives, inundated another one storing toxic chemical waste in Missouri, and limited access to others, federal regulators said Wednesday. The Environmental Protection...
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FILE - In this June 25, 1952 file photo, a fire tug fights flames on the Cuyahoga River near downtown Cleveland. Federal environmental regulators say fish living in the northeastern Ohio river are now safe to eat. The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga River was lauded by Republican Gov. Mike DeWine as progress achieved by investing in water quality.(The Plain Dealer via AP)
March 19, 2019 - 1:59 pm
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Fish in the Cuyahoga River, which became synonymous with pollution when it caught fire in Cleveland in 1969, are now safe to eat, federal environmental regulators say. The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga was lauded Monday by Republican Gov. Mike DeWine...
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FILE - In this June 25, 1952 file photo, a fire tug fights flames on the Cuyahoga River near downtown Cleveland. Federal environmental regulators say fish living in the northeastern Ohio river are now safe to eat. The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga River was lauded by Republican Gov. Mike DeWine as progress achieved by investing in water quality.(The Plain Dealer via AP)
March 19, 2019 - 11:02 am
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Fish in an Ohio river that became synonymous with pollution when it caught fire in 1969 are now safe to eat, federal environmental regulators say. The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga River in northeast Ohio was lauded Monday by Republican Gov. Mike...
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FILE - In this May 25, 2017, file photo, the Milton R. Young Station lignite coal-fired power plant near Center, N.D., glows as dusk blankets the North Dakota prairie landscape. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2019, it will retain the standard for sulfur dioxide pollution established in 2010 under President Barack Obama. Sulfur dioxide comes from burning coal to produce electricity and from other industrial sources. (Tom Stromme/The Bismarck Tribune via AP, File)
February 26, 2019 - 6:26 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. environmental regulators on Tuesday announced they are leaving intact an air quality standard for power plant pollution that can worsen asthma in children, despite calls by health advocates for a tougher rule. The move keeps in place a threshold for sulfur dioxide...
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FILE - In this May 25, 2017, file photo, the Milton R. Young Station lignite coal-fired power plant near Center, N.D., glows as dusk blankets the North Dakota prairie landscape. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2019, it will retain the standard for sulfur dioxide pollution established in 2010 under President Barack Obama. Sulfur dioxide comes from burning coal to produce electricity and from other industrial sources. (Tom Stromme/The Bismarck Tribune via AP, File)
February 26, 2019 - 3:35 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. environmental regulators on Tuesday announced they are leaving intact an air quality standard for power plant pollution that can worsen asthma in children, despite calls by health advocates for a tougher standard. The move keeps in place a threshold for sulfur dioxide...
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February 14, 2019 - 5:22 am
MOSCOW (AP) — The Kremlin is looking into reports of alarmingly high pollution levels in a town in the Urals emanating from a decommissioned copper mine. Carbon dioxide levels in Sibay, about 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow, skyrocketed earlier this month and peaked over the weekend...
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A dead fish floats in the Paraopeba River, full of mud that was released by the collapse of a mining company dam near a community of the Pataxo Ha-ha-hae indigenous people in Brumadinho, Brazil, Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019. Mining giant Vale representatives insisted that the slow-moving mud spreading down the Paraopeba River following the Jan. 25 collapse is composed mostly of silica, or sand, and is non-toxic, but environmental groups contend the iron ore mine waste contains high levels of iron oxide that could cause irreversible damage. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
January 30, 2019 - 10:28 am
RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — A torrent of mining waste unleashed by a dam breach that killed at least 84 people in southeastern Brazil is now heading down a small river with high concentrations of iron oxide, threatening to contaminate a much larger river that provides drinking water to communities in...
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