Immigration policy

Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson smiles during a news conference about President Trump's new executive order Monday, March 6, 2017, in Seattle. Trump signed an executive order Monday ordering new travel restrictions for residents of six Muslim-majority countries as well as a temporary ban on refugees from around the world, retooling a directive issued five weeks ago that stoked chaos at airports and drew international condemnation and a rebuke in the federal courts. The new ban, which takes effect March 16, halts travel for 90 days for residents of Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
March 06, 2017 - 6:50 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's revised travel ban eases some of the legal questions surrounding the previous order, but critics said it does not answer all of them, including accusations that the measure is a thinly veiled attempt to discriminate against Muslims. Opponents promised to...
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FILE - In this Sept. 10, 2014, file photo, an unidentified Guatemalan woman stands inside a dormitory in the Artesia Family Residential Center, a federal detention facility for undocumented immigrant mothers and children in Artesia, N.M. The nation's immigration courts are already overwhelmed, facing a backlog of more than half a million cases. Recent directives from President Donald Trump's administration to step up enforcement of immigration laws and expanding the number of people considered priorities for deportation could funnel even more people into the overloaded immigration court system. (AP Photo/Juan Carlos Llorca, File)
March 04, 2017 - 10:27 am
ATLANTA (AP) — Everyone was in place for the hearing in Atlanta immigration court: the Guinean man hoping to stay in the U.S., his attorney, a prosecutor, a translator and the judge. But because of some missing paperwork, it was all for nothing. When the government attorney said he hadn't received...
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March 02, 2017 - 9:30 pm
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — A New York musician tweeted Thursday he will no longer perform at the SXSW Music Festival over a contract provision stating that U.S. immigration agents may be contacted if an international artist violates the performance agreement. SXSW organizers responded by saying that...
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President Donald Trump addresses a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017. (Jim Lo Scalzo/Pool Image via AP)
March 01, 2017 - 2:24 am
The latest on foreign reaction to President Donald Trump's speech to Congress (all times EST): 2:15 a.m. President Donald Trump in his speech said that stiff 100 percent import duties on American company Harley-Davidson's expensive motorcycles were hurting the manufacturer. But in India, one of the...
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President Donald Trump shakes hands after signing the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) executive order, Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017, in the Roosevelt Room in the White House in Washington, which directs the Environmental Protection Agency to withdraw the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule, which expands the number of waterways that are federally protected under the Clean Water Act. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
February 28, 2017 - 7:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump, signaling a potential shift on a signature issue, indicated Tuesday that he's open to immigration legislation that would give legal status to some people living in the U.S. illegally and provide a pathway to citizenship to those brought to the U.S...
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FILE - This July 25, 2016 file photo Astrid Silva of PLAN speaks during the first day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. Silva, who was brought into the United States as a young child, will provide the Spanish-language rebuttal to President Donald Trump's first address to Congress Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)
February 27, 2017 - 10:29 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — An activist who will deliver a Democratic response in Spanish to President Donald Trump's first speech to a joint session of Congress on Tuesday plans to address his administration's crackdown on undocumented immigrants and the need for affordable health care. The remarks from...
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FILE - This July 25, 2016 file photo Astrid Silva of PLAN speaks during the first day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. Silva, who was brought into the United States as a young child, will provide the Spanish-language rebuttal to President Donald Trump's first address to Congress Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)
February 27, 2017 - 10:25 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — An immigration activist who will deliver a Democratic response in Spanish to President Donald Trump's first speech to a joint session of Congress on Tuesday plans to address his administration's crackdown on undocumented immigrants and the need for affordable health care. The...
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Mr. Lane, who did not give his first name, sits at the dining room table as his two children watch a movie in their home Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, in San Diego. The Lane family has been on edge since President Donald Trump took office. The mother, a Mexican who is in the country illegally, now carries her birth and marriage certificates and other documents wherever she goes. Around the country, Trump's efforts to crack down on the estimated 11 million immigrants living illegally in the U.S. have spread fear and anxiety and led many people to brace for arrest and to change up their daily routines in hopes of not getting caught. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
February 23, 2017 - 2:30 am
In Orange County, California, dozens of immigrant parents have signed legal documents authorizing friends and relatives to pick up their children from school and access their bank accounts to pay their bills in the event they are arrested by immigration agents. In Philadelphia, immigrants are...
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Mr. Lane, who did not give his first name, sits at the dining room table as his two children watch a movie in their home Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, in San Diego. The Lane family has been on edge since President Donald Trump took office. The mother, a Mexican who is in the country illegally, now carries her birth and marriage certificates and other documents wherever she goes. Around the country, Trump's efforts to crack down on the estimated 11 million immigrants living illegally in the U.S. have spread fear and anxiety and led many people to brace for arrest and to change up their daily routines in hopes of not getting caught. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
February 23, 2017 - 12:46 am
In Orange County, California, dozens of immigrant parents have signed legal documents authorizing friends and relatives to pick up their children from school and access their bank accounts to pay their bills in the event they are arrested by immigration agents. In Philadelphia, immigrants are...
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Molly Hitt, of Boston, displays an American flag while standing in front of a memorial to the Irish potato famine, right, during a rally called "We Will Persist," Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017, in Boston. According to organizers the rally was held to send a message to Republicans in Congress and the administration of President Donald Trump that they will continue to press for immigration rights and continued affordable healthcare coverage. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
February 21, 2017 - 8:43 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Millions of people living in the United States illegally could be targeted for deportation — including people simply arrested for traffic violations — under a sweeping rewrite of immigration enforcement policies announced Tuesday by the Trump administration. Any immigrant who is...
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