Immigration policy

President Donald Trump shakes hands after signing the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) executive order, Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017, in the Roosevelt Room in the White House in Washington, which directs the Environmental Protection Agency to withdraw the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule, which expands the number of waterways that are federally protected under the Clean Water Act. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
February 28, 2017 - 7:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump, signaling a potential shift on a signature issue, indicated Tuesday that he's open to immigration legislation that would give legal status to some people living in the U.S. illegally and provide a pathway to citizenship to those brought to the U.S...
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FILE - This July 25, 2016 file photo Astrid Silva of PLAN speaks during the first day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. Silva, who was brought into the United States as a young child, will provide the Spanish-language rebuttal to President Donald Trump's first address to Congress Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)
February 27, 2017 - 10:29 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — An activist who will deliver a Democratic response in Spanish to President Donald Trump's first speech to a joint session of Congress on Tuesday plans to address his administration's crackdown on undocumented immigrants and the need for affordable health care. The remarks from...
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FILE - This July 25, 2016 file photo Astrid Silva of PLAN speaks during the first day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. Silva, who was brought into the United States as a young child, will provide the Spanish-language rebuttal to President Donald Trump's first address to Congress Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)
February 27, 2017 - 10:25 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — An immigration activist who will deliver a Democratic response in Spanish to President Donald Trump's first speech to a joint session of Congress on Tuesday plans to address his administration's crackdown on undocumented immigrants and the need for affordable health care. The...
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Mr. Lane, who did not give his first name, sits at the dining room table as his two children watch a movie in their home Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, in San Diego. The Lane family has been on edge since President Donald Trump took office. The mother, a Mexican who is in the country illegally, now carries her birth and marriage certificates and other documents wherever she goes. Around the country, Trump's efforts to crack down on the estimated 11 million immigrants living illegally in the U.S. have spread fear and anxiety and led many people to brace for arrest and to change up their daily routines in hopes of not getting caught. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
February 23, 2017 - 2:30 am
In Orange County, California, dozens of immigrant parents have signed legal documents authorizing friends and relatives to pick up their children from school and access their bank accounts to pay their bills in the event they are arrested by immigration agents. In Philadelphia, immigrants are...
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Mr. Lane, who did not give his first name, sits at the dining room table as his two children watch a movie in their home Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, in San Diego. The Lane family has been on edge since President Donald Trump took office. The mother, a Mexican who is in the country illegally, now carries her birth and marriage certificates and other documents wherever she goes. Around the country, Trump's efforts to crack down on the estimated 11 million immigrants living illegally in the U.S. have spread fear and anxiety and led many people to brace for arrest and to change up their daily routines in hopes of not getting caught. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
February 23, 2017 - 12:46 am
In Orange County, California, dozens of immigrant parents have signed legal documents authorizing friends and relatives to pick up their children from school and access their bank accounts to pay their bills in the event they are arrested by immigration agents. In Philadelphia, immigrants are...
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Molly Hitt, of Boston, displays an American flag while standing in front of a memorial to the Irish potato famine, right, during a rally called "We Will Persist," Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017, in Boston. According to organizers the rally was held to send a message to Republicans in Congress and the administration of President Donald Trump that they will continue to press for immigration rights and continued affordable healthcare coverage. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
February 21, 2017 - 8:43 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Millions of people living in the United States illegally could be targeted for deportation — including people simply arrested for traffic violations — under a sweeping rewrite of immigration enforcement policies announced Tuesday by the Trump administration. Any immigrant who is...
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