Immigration

In this Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018, photo a supporter holds up a sign for Gil Cisneros, a candidate who is running for a U.S. House seat in the 39th District in California, at a rally on the Cal State Fullerton campus in Fullerton, Calif. For decades, Orange County, California, was known as a Republican stronghold but times have changed. A sign of the change is in the 39th District, where, Young Kim, a Korean immigrant Republican is running against Cisneros, a Hispanic Democrat. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)
October 17, 2018 - 1:06 am
FULLERTON, Calif. (AP) — Pushy midday shoppers nose their carts through the Korean market, stocking up on bottled kimchi and seaweed spring rolls. A few doors away, customers grab pho to go at a Vietnamese takeout counter. Across the street, lunchtime diners line up for tacos "al pastor" — spit-...
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Honduran migrants sleep at an improvised shelter in Esquipulas, Guatemala, Monday, Oct. 15, 2018. The group, estimated at 1,600 to 2,000 people hoping to reach the United States, bedded down for the night in this town after Guatemala's authorities blinked first in attempts to halt their advance. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)
October 16, 2018 - 10:32 am
ESQUIPULAS, Guatemala (AP) — Hundreds of Hondurans hoping to reach the United States bedded down for the night in the Guatemalan town of Esquipulas after that country's authorities blinked first in attempts to halt their advance. U.S. President Donald Trump, meanwhile, threatened on Tuesday to cut...
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Honduran migrants walk past a roadblock of Guatemalan police as they make their way to the U.S., in Esquipulas, Guatemala, Monday, Oct. 15, 2018. Police stopped the migrants for several hours but the travelers refused to return to the border and were eventually allowed to pass. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)
October 16, 2018 - 9:06 am
ESQUIPULAS, Guatemala (AP) — Hundreds of Hondurans hoping to reach the United States bedded down for the night in this Guatemalan town after that country's authorities blinked first in attempts to halt their advance. The group estimated at 1,600 to 2,000 people fleeing poverty and violence in...
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U.S. Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., goes over the rules in a television studio prior to a televised debate with U.S. Rep. Martha McSally, R-Ariz., Monday, Oct. 15, 2018, in Phoenix. Both ladies are seeking to fill the seat of U.S. Sen. Jake Flake, R-Ariz., who is retiring. The Arizona Senate contest is one of the most closely-watched in the nation. (AP Photo/Matt York)
October 16, 2018 - 1:17 am
PHOENIX (AP) — Republican Rep. Martha McSally accused her Democratic opponent, Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, of supporting "treason," citing a 15-year-old radio interview -- a charge that Sinema dismissed as part of a "ridiculous" negative campaign during Monday's debate in the race for Arizona's open...
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FILE--In this Aug. 28, 2018, file photo, Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., talks to campaign volunteers at a Democratic campaign office on primary election day in Phoenix. Republican Martha McSally and Sinema will confront each other at a debate Monday, Oct. 15, 2018, in a race for the seat being vacated by retiring Sen. Jeff Flake, which could determine which party controls the Senate next year. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, file)
October 15, 2018 - 11:42 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — Republican Rep. Martha McSally accused her Democratic opponent, Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, of supporting "treason," citing a 15-year-old radio interview -- a charge that Sinema dismissed as part of a "ridiculous" negative campaign during Monday's debate in the race for Arizona's open...
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Honduran migrants walk past a roadblock of Guatemalan police as they make their way to the U.S., in Esquipulas, Guatemala, Monday, Oct. 15, 2018. Police stopped the migrants for several hours but the travelers refused to return to the border and were eventually allowed to pass. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)
October 15, 2018 - 9:59 pm
ESQUIPULAS, Guatemala (AP) — Hundreds of Honduran migrants surged over the Guatemalan border under a broiling sun Monday hoping to make it to new lives in the United States, far from the poverty and violence of their home nation. Police stopped the migrants at a roadblock outside Esquipulas for...
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October 15, 2018 - 3:26 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A New York judge has ordered the immediate release of a two-year old Honduran boy that was separated from his father at the border more than five months ago, calling the separation of the two "the most cruel of all cruelties". The boy, only identified as D.J.C.V. at a hearing in...
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This November 2017 photo provided by Badamsereejid Gansukh shows him in front of a U.S. military recruiting office in New York's Times Square. Gansukh, whose recruiter told him his Turkish language skills would be an asset to the military, said he didn’t know he was discharged at all until he asked his congressman’s office in the summer of 2018 to help him figure out why his security screening was taking so long. (Courtesy of Badamsereejid Gansukh via AP)
October 11, 2018 - 9:00 pm
Over the course of 12 months, the U.S. Army discharged more than 500 immigrant enlistees who were recruited across the globe for their language or medical skills and promised a fast track to citizenship in exchange for their service, The Associated Press has found. The decade-old Military...
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This image shows a portion of a U.S. Army document submitted to the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia in September 2018 which lists 502 service members who enlisted under the Military Accessions Vital to the National Interest recruiting program, and who were discharged between July 2017 and July 2018. The document was unsealed at the request of The Associated Press, which has interviewed more than a dozen recruits from countries such as Brazil, Pakistan, Iran, China and Mongolia who said they were devastated by their unexpected discharges or canceled contracts. (U.S. Army via AP)
October 11, 2018 - 7:12 pm
Over the course of 12 months, the U.S. Army discharged more than 500 immigrant enlistees who were recruited across the globe for their language or medical skills and promised a fast track to citizenship in exchange for their service, The Associated Press has found. The decade-old Military...
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Vice President Mike Pence speaks during the second Conference for Prosperity and Security in Central America meeting at State Department on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
October 11, 2018 - 4:49 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice President Mike Pence told leaders of three Central American countries on Thursday that the U.S. is ready to do more to help their economies if they make a greater effort to fight illegal immigration. "If you do more, I'm here to say on behalf of the president of the United...
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