Illegal weapons

FILE - In this March 24, 2018, file photo, thousands of people gather on the grounds of the Texas State Capitol during a "March for Our Lives" rally in Austin, Texas. The vast majority of mass shooters have acquired their firearms legally with nothing in their background that would have prohibited them from possessing a gun. But there have been examples of lapses in the background check system that allowed guns to end up in the wrong hands. Very few states also have a mechanism to seize firearms from someone who is not legally allowed to possess one.(Nick Wagner/Austin American-Statesman via AP, File)
September 07, 2019 - 6:38 pm
Most mass shooters in the U.S. acquired the weapons they used legally because there was nothing in their backgrounds to disqualify them, according to James Alan Fox, a criminologist with Northeastern University who has studied mass shootings for decades. But in several attacks in recent years...
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FILE - In this March 24, 2018, file photo, thousands of people gather on the grounds of the Texas State Capitol during a "March for Our Lives" rally in Austin, Texas. The vast majority of mass shooters have acquired their firearms legally with nothing in their background that would have prohibited them from possessing a gun. But there have been examples of lapses in the background check system that allowed guns to end up in the wrong hands. Very few states also have a mechanism to seize firearms from someone who is not legally allowed to possess one.(Nick Wagner/Austin American-Statesman via AP, File)
September 07, 2019 - 3:22 pm
Most mass shooters in the U.S. acquired the weapons they used legally because there was nothing in their backgrounds to disqualify them, according to James Alan Fox, a criminologist with Northeastern University who has studied mass shootings for decades. But in several attacks in recent years...
Read More
FILE - In this March 24, 2018, file photo, thousands of people gather on the grounds of the Texas State Capitol during a "March for Our Lives" rally in Austin, Texas. The vast majority of mass shooters have acquired their firearms legally with nothing in their background that would have prohibited them from possessing a gun. But there have been examples of lapses in the background check system that allowed guns to end up in the wrong hands. Very few states also have a mechanism to seize firearms from someone who is not legally allowed to possess one.(Nick Wagner/Austin American-Statesman via AP, File)
September 07, 2019 - 12:39 pm
Most mass shooters in the U.S. acquired the weapons they used legally because there was nothing in their backgrounds to disqualify them, according to James Alan Fox, a criminologist with Northeastern University who has studied mass shootings for decades. But in several attacks in recent years...
Read More
FILE - In this March 24, 2018, file photo, thousands of people gather on the grounds of the Texas State Capitol during a "March for Our Lives" rally in Austin, Texas. The vast majority of mass shooters have acquired their firearms legally with nothing in their background that would have prohibited them from possessing a gun. But there have been examples of lapses in the background check system that allowed guns to end up in the wrong hands. Very few states also have a mechanism to seize firearms from someone who is not legally allowed to possess one.(Nick Wagner/Austin American-Statesman via AP, File)
September 07, 2019 - 11:05 am
Most mass shooters in the U.S. acquired the weapons they used legally because there was nothing in their background to disqualify them, according to James Alan Fox, a criminologist with Northeastern University who has studied mass shootings for decades. But in several attacks in recent years gunmen...
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President Donald Trump talks with reporters after receiving a briefing on Hurricane Dorian in the Oval Office of the White House, Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
September 04, 2019 - 6:04 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — President Donald Trump declared Wednesday that he wanted to move quickly on gun violence legislation, but his new push came just days after posting an ad on his official Facebook page that defended the Second Amendment and warned that Democrats were looking to seize Americans'...
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FILE - This undated file booking photo provided by the San Francisco Police Department shows Jose Ines Garcia-Zarate, a homeless undocumented immigrant who was acquitted of killing Kate Steinle on a San Francisco pier in 2015. A California state appeals court has thrown out the sole conviction against Jose Ines Garcia-Zarate who fatally shot a woman on the San Francisco waterfront in 2015, Friday, Aug. 30, 2019. (San Francisco Police Department via AP, File)
August 30, 2019 - 9:09 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A California state appeals court on Friday threw out the sole conviction against an immigrant who fatally shot a young woman on the San Francisco waterfront in 2015 in a case that sparked a national immigration debate. Jose Inez Garcia-Zarate was acquitted of murder in the...
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FILE - In this Aug. 27, 2017 file photo, Kodak Black arrives at the MTV Video Music Awards at The Forum in Inglewood, Calif. Rapper Kodak Black is expected to plead guilty to federal weapons charges. A hearing is set for Thursday, Aug. 22, 2019, in Miami federal court. The decision comes months after an original plea of innocence. Prosecutors in May charged the 21-year-old rapper for crimes that involve falsifying information on federal forms to purchase three firearms. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File)
August 22, 2019 - 4:21 pm
MIAMI (AP) — Rapper Kodak Black pleaded guilty on Thursday to federal weapons charges stemming from his arrest just before a scheduled concert performance in May. Black entered the change of plea in a Miami federal court. Prosecutors charged him with crimes including falsifying information on...
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Travelers wait at the check-in counters in the departure hall of the Hong Kong International Airport in Hong Kong, Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2019. Protesters clogged the departure area at Hong Kong's reopened airport Tuesday, a day after they forced one of the world's busiest transport hubs to shut down entirely amid their calls for an independent inquiry into alleged police abuse. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian)
August 13, 2019 - 6:41 am
HONG KONG (AP) — The Latest on Hong Kong protests (all times local): 6:35 p.m. The United Nations' top human rights official has condemned violence in Hong Kong's pro-democracy protests and called on the authorities and protesters to solve their dispute peacefully. A spokesman for U.N. High...
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FILE - In this Sunday, Aug. 11, 2019, file photo, visitors watch the North side from the Imjingak Pavilion in Paju, South Korea. U.N. experts say they are investigating at least 35 instances in 17 countries of North Koreans using cyberattacks to illegally raise money for its nuclear program, and they are calling for sanctions against ships providing gasoline and diesel to the country. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man, File)
August 12, 2019 - 8:52 pm
UNITED NATIONS (AP) — U.N. experts say they are investigating at least 35 instances in 17 countries of North Koreans using cyberattacks to illegally raise money for weapons of mass destruction programs — and they are calling for sanctions against ships providing gasoline and diesel to the country...
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Employees and volunteers at Windermere Real Estate work at selling "#Gilroy Strong" T-shirts, with proceeds benefiting shooting victims, in Gilroy, Calif., Tuesday, July 30, 2019. Gilroy is the latest U.S. community to vow that a gunman wouldn't tear them down. A shooter killed two children and a 25-year-old from upstate New York at the Gilroy Garlic Festival this past weekend. People in the rural community known for growing garlic have raised their voices in the defiant cry of "Gilroy Strong" as authorities seek a motive for the killings. (AP Photo/Haven Daley)
July 30, 2019 - 9:37 pm
Officials say a 19-year-old gunman used a rifle he legally bought in Nevada and illegally brought into California to kill two children and a man at a food festival before he was killed by police. But police initially named a weapon that would be legal under California law, only later clarifying...
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