Hunting

In this Wednesday, Oct. 15, 2019 handout photo shows Paul Bedard raising a 9-foot alligator over his head at a home in Parkland, Fla. Bedard, a local trapper, removed the nuisance reptile that had jumped into a customers pool. Bedard stars in the Animal Planet show "Gator Boys." (Paul Bedard via AP)
October 17, 2019 - 1:45 pm
PARKLAND, Fla. (AP) — A Florida animal trapper says he corralled a large alligator by playing with it until it got tired after it hopped into a residential swimming pool. Celebrity trapper Paul Bedard, who is contracted with the state's nuisance alligator program, said Thursday that he was...
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In this Monday Sept. 30, 2019 photo a deer stuck in an empty swimming pool in the village Esborn near the town Wetter an der Ruhr, Germany. Firefighters have freed a deer with the help of an hunter. (Feuerwehr Wetter (Ruhr) via AP)
October 01, 2019 - 5:33 am
BERLIN (AP) — Firefighters have freed a deer that got stuck in an empty swimming pool in a German town, with a little help from a hunter. The fire service in Wetter an der Ruhr, in western Germany, said it was alerted to the animal's plight on Monday. Five firefighters sent to the scene found the...
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FILE - In this Dec. 8, 2011 file photo, Harriman, Tenn., resident Shannon Robinson shows the map displayed on his GPS device that tracks the location of his hunting dogs. Animal rights groups are suing California over rules that allow animals to be hunted with the aid of hunting dogs wearing GPS tracking devices on their collars. The Animal Legal Defense Fund says the hunting method is "cruel and unfair." The group says tracking devices allow dogs to chase prey to the point of exhaustion. Then hunters follow the GPS to find an animal that is easily shot. The lawsuit targets the Fish and Game Commission, which didn't immediately respond to requests for comment. (Saul Young/News Sentinel via AP)
September 10, 2019 - 6:41 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Animal rights groups are suing California over rules that allow animals to be hunted with the aid of hunting dogs wearing GPS tracking devices on their collars. The Animal Legal Defense Fund, which filed the lawsuit last week in Sacramento Superior Court, called the...
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FILE - In this May 29, 2019 file photo, Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez, D-San Diego speaks during the Assembly session in Sacramento, Calif. Gov. Gavin Newsom signed Gonzalez' bill, AB273, that now makes it illegal to trap animals in California for recreation or to sell their fur, Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
September 04, 2019 - 7:45 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California on Wednesday became the first state to ban commercial fur trapping, ending the practice nearly 200 years after animals like beavers and otters introduced the American West to international trade. Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom said Wednesday he had signed a bill...
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FILE - In this May 29, 2019 file photo, Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez, D-San Diego speaks during the Assembly session in Sacramento, Calif. Gov. Gavin Newsom signed Gonzalez' bill, AB273, that now makes it illegal to trap animals in California for recreation or to sell their fur, Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
September 04, 2019 - 7:42 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California on Wednesday became the first state to ban commercial fur trapping, ending the practice nearly 200 years after animals like beavers and otters introduced the American West to international trade. Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom said Wednesday he had signed a bill...
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August 01, 2019 - 10:40 pm
Alb any, N.Y. (WBEN) - As properry owners along the Lake Ontario shoreline are reeling from the impact of high water levels, Governor Andrew Cuomo is launching a new campaign to boost tourism in the Lake Ontario region. The new initiative includes free fishing on Lake Ontario, St. Lawrence River...
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Wildlife biologist/crocodile specialist Michael Lloret releases baby crocodiles back into the wild along the cooling canals next to the Turkey Point Nuclear Generating Station after having measured and tagged them with microchips to observe their development in the future, Friday, July 19, 2019, in Homestead, Fla. The 168-miles of man-made canals serve as the home to several hundred crocodiles, where a team of specialists working for Florida Power and Light (FPL) monitors and protects the American crocodiles. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)
July 20, 2019 - 5:03 pm
MIAMI (AP) — American crocodiles, once headed toward extinction, are thriving at an unusual spot — the canals surrounding a South Florida nuclear plant. Last week, 73 crocodile hatchlings were rescued by a team of specialists at Florida Power & Light's Turkey Point nuclear plant and dozens more...
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A whale is unloaded at a port in Kushiro, in the northernmost main island of Hokkaido, Monday, July 1, 2019. Japan is resuming commercial whaling after 31 years, meeting a long-cherished goal seen as a largely lost cause. Japan's six-month notice to withdraw from the International Whaling Commission took effect Sunday.(Masanori Takei/Kyodo News via AP)
July 01, 2019 - 8:38 pm
TOKYO (AP) — Japanese whalers returned to port Monday with their first catch after resuming commercial whaling for the first time in 31 years, achieving the long-cherished goal of traditionalists that is seen as largely a lost cause amid slowing demand for the meat and changing views on...
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A whale is unloaded at a port in Kushiro, in the northernmost main island of Hokkaido, Monday, July 1, 2019. Japan is resuming commercial whaling after 31 years, meeting a long-cherished goal seen as a largely lost cause. Japan's six-month notice to withdraw from the International Whaling Commission took effect Sunday.(Masanori Takei/Kyodo News via AP)
July 01, 2019 - 9:25 am
TOKYO (AP) — Japanese whalers returned to port Monday with their first catch after resuming commercial whaling for the first time in 31 years, achieving the long-cherished goal of traditionalists that is seen as largely a lost cause amid slowing demand for the meat and changing views on...
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Whaling boat leave a port in Kushiro, Hokkaido, northern Japan Monday, July 1, 2019. Japan is resuming commercial whaling for the first time in 31 years, a long-cherished goal seen as a largely lost cause. (Masanori Takei/Kyodo News via AP)
July 01, 2019 - 6:04 am
TOKYO (AP) — Japan resumed commercial whaling Monday after 31 years, meeting a long-cherished goal of traditionalists that's seen as a largely lost cause due to slowing demand for the meat and changing views on conservation. Whaling boats embarked on their first commercial hunts since 1988, when...
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