Heat waves

In this Oct. 7, 2019 photo, Scott Allen, who runs Pettit Creek Farms in bone-dry Bartow County, Ga., poses for a photo. Allen says the small streams normally used to provide water for his camels, kangaroos, zebras and other animals have dried up so they are forced to rely on other water sources. Allen says the animals are fine, but the dust is relentless since there's been no significant rain during the past two months. (AP Photo/Jeff Martin) (AP Photo/Jeff Martin)
October 10, 2019 - 6:31 am
CARTERSVILLE, Ga. (AP) — Across a vast expanse of the South stretching from Texas to Maryland, there are growing concerns for the cattle, cotton and corn amid a worsening drought fueled by this summer's record high temperatures. One of the bullseyes marking the nation's driest areas is Bartow...
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Alisa Vainio, of Finland, competes during the women's marathon at the World Athletics Championships in Doha, Qatar, Saturday, Sept. 28, 2019. (AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty)
September 28, 2019 - 10:53 am
DOHA, Qatar (AP) — The Latest on the track and field world championships (all times local): 5:45 p.m. This will not be a walk in the park. The IAAF says the 50k race walks will go on as scheduled. The races will take place Saturday night on the same course as the women's marathon, which kicked off...
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A Kashmiri family awaits their turn to meet a relative in Agra Central Jail in Agra, India, Friday, Sept. 20, 2019. Families from the Himalayan region of Kashmir have traveled nearly 1,000 kilometers (600 miles) in sweltering heat to meet relatives being held in an Indian jail in the city of Agra. At least 4,000 people, mostly young men, have been arrested in Indian-held Kashmir since the government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi imposed a security clampdown and scrapped the region’s semi-autonomy on Aug. 5, according to police officials and records reviewed by AP. (AP Photo/Altaf Qadri)
September 20, 2019 - 11:47 am
AGRA, India (AP) — Hameeda Begum explained her arduous journey from the Himalayan region of disputed Kashmir to the hot and humid room in the Agra Central Jail where the exhausted 70-year-old was waiting to see her son. A man in his early twenties offered her a bottle of water, saying, "Don't lose...
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A Kashmiri family awaits their turn to meet a relative in Agra Central Jail in Agra, India, Friday, Sept. 20, 2019. Families from the Himalayan region of Kashmir have traveled nearly 1,000 kilometers (600 miles) in sweltering heat to meet relatives being held in an Indian jail in the city of Agra. At least 4,000 people, mostly young men, have been arrested in Indian-held Kashmir since the government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi imposed a security clampdown and scrapped the region’s semi-autonomy on Aug. 5, according to police officials and records reviewed by AP. (AP Photo/Altaf Qadri)
September 20, 2019 - 11:35 am
AGRA, India (AP) — Hameeda Begum explained her arduous journey from the Himalayan region of disputed Kashmir to the hot and humid room in the Agra Central Jail where she was waiting to see her son. A man in his early twenties offered her a bottle of water, saying, "Don't lose hope. You are not...
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File - In this Sept. 14, 2017, file photo, salmon circle just below the surface inside a lock where they joined boats heading from salt water Shilshole Bay into fresh water Salmon Bay at the Ballard Locks in Seattle. Federal scientists say they're monitoring a new ocean heat wave off the West Coast. Researchers with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019, the expanse of unusually warm water stretches from Alaska to California, and it resembles a similar heatwave that disrupted marine life five years ago. It remains to be seen whether this heat wave will linger or dissipate more quickly than the last one. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
September 05, 2019 - 5:48 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Federal scientists said Thursday they are monitoring a new ocean heat wave off the U.S. West Coast, a development that could badly disrupt marine life including salmon, whales and sea lions. The expanse of unusually warm water stretches from Alaska to California, researchers with the...
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File - In this Sept. 14, 2017, file photo, salmon circle just below the surface inside a lock where they joined boats heading from salt water Shilshole Bay into fresh water Salmon Bay at the Ballard Locks in Seattle. Federal scientists say they're monitoring a new ocean heat wave off the West Coast. Researchers with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019, the expanse of unusually warm water stretches from Alaska to California, and it resembles a similar heatwave that disrupted marine life five years ago. It remains to be seen whether this heat wave will linger or dissipate more quickly than the last one. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
September 05, 2019 - 4:50 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Federal scientists said Thursday they are monitoring a new ocean heat wave off the U.S. West Coast, a development that could badly disrupt marine life including salmon, whales and sea lions. The expanse of unusually warm water stretches from Alaska to California, researchers with the...
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File - In this Sept. 14, 2017, file photo, salmon circle just below the surface inside a lock where they joined boats heading from salt water Shilshole Bay into fresh water Salmon Bay at the Ballard Locks in Seattle. Federal scientists say they're monitoring a new ocean heat wave off the West Coast. Researchers with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019, the expanse of unusually warm water stretches from Alaska to California, and it resembles a similar heatwave that disrupted marine life five years ago. It remains to be seen whether this heat wave will linger or dissipate more quickly than the last one. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
September 05, 2019 - 3:19 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Federal scientists said Thursday they are monitoring a new ocean heat wave off the U.S. West Coast, a development that could badly disrupt marine life including salmon, whales and sea lions. The expanse of unusually warm water stretches from Alaska to California, researchers with the...
Read More
File - In this Sept. 14, 2017, file photo, salmon circle just below the surface inside a lock where they joined boats heading from salt water Shilshole Bay into fresh water Salmon Bay at the Ballard Locks in Seattle. Federal scientists say they're monitoring a new ocean heat wave off the West Coast. Researchers with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019, the expanse of unusually warm water stretches from Alaska to California, and it resembles a similar heatwave that disrupted marine life five years ago. It remains to be seen whether this heat wave will linger or dissipate more quickly than the last one. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
September 05, 2019 - 2:20 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Federal scientists say they are monitoring a new ocean heat wave off the U.S. West Coast. Researchers with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday the expanse of unusually warm water stretches from Alaska to California, and it resembles a similar heat wave...
Read More
FILE - A Sept. 13, 2017 file photo shows a police staging area at the south entrance of the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills where residents died, in Hollywood, Fla. Defense attorneys said Sunday, August 25, 2019 that arrests are expected shortly in the case of the Florida nursing home where 12 elderly patients died after the complex lost power and was engulfed by sweltering heat during the powerful 2017 Hurricane Irma.(Charles Trainor Jr./Miami Herald via AP, File)
August 26, 2019 - 9:18 pm
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — Four employees of a Florida nursing home where 12 people died in sweltering heat after a hurricane cut power were charged Monday, at least three of them with aggravated manslaughter, their attorneys said. Nursing home patients at the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood...
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FILE - A Sept. 13, 2017 file photo shows a police staging area at the south entrance of the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills where residents died, in Hollywood, Fla. Defense attorneys said Sunday, August 25, 2019 that arrests are expected shortly in the case of the Florida nursing home where 12 elderly patients died after the complex lost power and was engulfed by sweltering heat during the powerful 2017 Hurricane Irma.(Charles Trainor Jr./Miami Herald via AP, File)
August 26, 2019 - 7:42 pm
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — Four employees of a Florida nursing home where 12 people died in sweltering heat after a hurricane cut power were charged Monday, at least three of them with aggravated manslaughter, their attorneys said. Nursing home patients at the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood...
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