Heart disease

FILE - This Thursday, Aug. 23, 2018 file photo shows an arrangement of aspirin pills in New York. A new study suggests millions of people need to rethink their use of aspirin to prevent a heart attack. If you've already had a heart attack, doctors recommend taking a low-dose aspirin a day to prevent a second one. But if you don't yet have heart disease, doctors now advise routine aspirin can do more harm than good. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison, File)
July 22, 2019 - 5:12 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Millions of people who take aspirin to prevent a heart attack may need to rethink the pill-popping, Harvard researchers reported Monday. A daily low-dose aspirin is recommended for people who have already had a heart attack or stroke and for those diagnosed with heart disease. But...
Read More
FILE - In this Friday, Jan. 18, 2019 file photo, a customer blows a cloud of smoke from a vape pipe at a local shop in Richmond, Va. Although e-cigarettes aren’t considered as risky as regular cigarettes, new research published Monday, May 27, 2019, finds a clue that their flavorings may be bad for the heart. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
May 27, 2019 - 5:07 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — E-cigarettes aren't considered as risky as regular cigarettes, but researchers have found a clue that their flavorings may be bad for the heart. Longtime smokers who can't kick the addiction sometimes switch to e-cigarettes, in hopes of avoiding the cancer-causing chemicals in...
Read More
FILE - In this May 14, 2008 file photo, cartons of eggs are displayed for sale in the Union Square green market in New York. The latest U.S. research on eggs won’t go over easy for those can’t eat breakfast without them. Study participants who ate about 1 ½ eggs daily had a slightly higher risk of heart disease than those who ate no eggs. The study showed the more eggs, the greater the risk. The chances of dying early were also elevated. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
March 15, 2019 - 7:10 pm
The latest U.S. research on eggs won't go over easy for those who can't eat breakfast without them. Adults who ate about 1 ½ eggs daily had a slightly higher risk of heart disease than those who ate no eggs. The study showed the more eggs, the greater the risk. The chances of dying early were also...
Read More
FILE - In this May 14, 2008 file photo, cartons of eggs are displayed for sale in the Union Square green market in New York. The latest U.S. research on eggs won’t go over easy for those can’t eat breakfast without them. Study participants who ate about 1 ½ eggs daily had a slightly higher risk of heart disease than those who ate no eggs. The study showed the more eggs, the greater the risk. The chances of dying early were also elevated. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
March 15, 2019 - 7:09 pm
The latest U.S. research on eggs won't go over easy for those who can't eat breakfast without them. Adults who ate about 1 ½ eggs daily had a slightly higher risk of heart disease than those who ate no eggs. The study showed the more eggs, the greater the risk. The chances of dying early were also...
Read More
March 15, 2019 - 2:37 pm
The latest U.S. research on eggs won't go over easy for those can't eat breakfast without them. Adults who ate about 1 ½ eggs daily had a slightly higher risk of heart disease than those who ate no eggs. The study showed the more eggs, the greater the risk. The chances of dying early were also...
Read More
FILE - In this Aug. 27, 2014 file photo, a laptop computer monitors a patient's heart function as he takes a stress test while riding a stationary bike in Augusta, Ga. A report released on Wednesday, Jan. 30 2019 estimates that nearly half of all U.S. adults have some form of heart or blood vessel disease, a medical milestone that's mostly due to recent guidelines that expanded how many people have high blood pressure. (AP Photo/The Augusta Chronicle, Michael Holahan)
January 31, 2019 - 9:42 am
A new report estimates that nearly half of all U.S. adults have some form of heart or blood vessel disease, a medical milestone that's mostly due to recent guidelines that expanded how many people have high blood pressure. The American Heart Association said Thursday that more than 121 million...
Read More
FILE - In this Aug. 27, 2014 file photo, a laptop computer monitors a patient's heart function as he takes a stress test while riding a stationary bike in Augusta, Ga. A report released on Wednesday, Jan. 30 2019 estimates that nearly half of all U.S. adults have some form of heart or blood vessel disease, a medical milestone that's mostly due to recent guidelines that expanded how many people have high blood pressure. (AP Photo/The Augusta Chronicle, Michael Holahan)
January 31, 2019 - 5:01 am
A new report estimates that nearly half of all U.S. adults have some form of heart or blood vessel disease, a medical milestone that's mostly due to recent guidelines that expanded how many people have high blood pressure. The American Heart Association says that more than 121 million adults had...
Read More
This undated photo provided by LaToya Holley shows Anton Black. Black's heart condition and mental illness were significant factors in his "sudden cardiac death" during a struggle with law enforcement officers on Maryland's Eastern Shore, according to an autopsy report. The report, signed Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019, by the state's chief medical examiner, didn't satisfy concerns by Anton Black's family that police used excessive force on the 19-year-old before his Sept. 15 death in Caroline County. (LaToya Holley via AP)
January 24, 2019 - 8:41 pm
SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — A Maryland prosecutor said Thursday he isn't asking a grand jury to consider criminal charges in the death of a black teenager who struggled with police officers, saying he can't prosecute "tragic acts." Caroline County State's Attorney Joseph Riley issued a five-page...
Read More
This undated photo provided by LaToya Holley shows Anton Black. Black's heart condition and mental illness were significant factors in his "sudden cardiac death" during a struggle with law enforcement officers on Maryland's Eastern Shore, according to an autopsy report. The report, signed Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019, by the state's chief medical examiner, didn't satisfy concerns by Anton Black's family that police used excessive force on the 19-year-old before his Sept. 15 death in Caroline County. (LaToya Holley via AP)
January 24, 2019 - 8:19 pm
SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — A Maryland prosecutor said Thursday he isn't asking a grand jury to consider criminal charges in the death of a black teenager who struggled with police officers, saying he can't prosecute "tragic acts." Caroline County State's Attorney Joseph Riley issued a five-page...
Read More
FILE - In this Aug. 27, 2014 file photo, a laptop computer monitors a patient's heart function as he takes a stress test in Augusta, Ga. The American Heart Association conference ending Monday, Nov. 12, 2018 in Chicago revealed a lot about what works and what does not for preventing heart attacks. (Michael Holahan/The Augusta Chronicle via AP)
November 11, 2018 - 1:05 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Fish oil, vitamin D, novel drugs, new cholesterol guidelines: News from an American Heart Association conference over the weekend reveals a lot about what works and what does not for preventing heart attacks and other problems. Dietary supplements missed the mark, but a prescription-...
Read More

Pages