Hacking

FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2019, file photo, a man feeds a ballot card into a digital voting machine during a demonstration in Raleigh, N.C. Americans have widespread concerns about the security and integrity of elections. Few say they have high confidence that votes in the 2020 presidential election will be counted accurately. A poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds skepticism about the democratic process in the United States. (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed, File)
February 27, 2020 - 10:01 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans have widespread concerns about the security and integrity of elections, with few saying they have high confidence that votes in the 2020 presidential election will be counted accurately. A poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds...
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FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2019, file photo, a man feeds a ballot card into a digital voting machine during a demonstration in Raleigh, N.C. Americans have widespread concerns about the security and integrity of elections. Few say they have high confidence that votes in the 2020 presidential election will be counted accurately. A poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds skepticism about the democratic process in the United States. (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed, File)
February 27, 2020 - 8:00 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans have widespread concerns about the security and integrity of elections, with few saying they have high confidence that votes in the 2020 presidential election will be counted accurately. A poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds...
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Democratic presidential candidate, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks at a campaign event in Myrtle Beach, S.C., Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2020. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
February 26, 2020 - 8:58 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Democratic National Committee has warned its presidential candidates to be cautious after Bernie Sanders' campaign reported that an “impersonator” with a domain registered overseas had posed as one of its staffers and sought conversations with members of at least two other...
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Democratic presidential candidate, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks at a campaign event in Myrtle Beach, S.C., Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2020. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
February 26, 2020 - 8:53 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Democratic National Committee has warned its presidential candidates to be cautious after Bernie Sanders' campaign reported that an “impersonator” with a domain registered overseas had posed as one of its staffers and sought conversations with members of at least two other...
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This is a court artist sketch of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange in the dock reading his papers as he appears at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court for his extradition hearing, in London, Monday, Feb. 24, 2020. The U.S. government and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange will face off Monday in a high-security London courthouse, a decade after WikiLeaks infuriated American officials by publishing a trove of classified military documents. (Elizabeth Cook/PA via AP)
February 24, 2020 - 9:05 am
LONDON (AP) — The U.S. government began outlining its extradition case against Julian Assange in a London court on Monday, arguing that the WikiLeaks founder is not a free-speech champion but an “ordinary” criminal who put many lives at risk with his secret-spilling. U.S. authorities want to try...
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This is a court artist sketch of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange in the dock reading his papers as he appears at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court for his extradition hearing, in London, Monday, Feb. 24, 2020. The U.S. government and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange will face off Monday in a high-security London courthouse, a decade after WikiLeaks infuriated American officials by publishing a trove of classified military documents. (Elizabeth Cook/PA via AP)
February 24, 2020 - 8:36 am
LONDON (AP) — The U.S. government began outlining its extradition case against Julian Assange in a London court on Monday, arguing that the WikiLeaks founder is not a free-speech champion but an “ordinary” criminal who put many lives at risk with his secret-spilling. U.S. authorities want to try...
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This is a court artist sketch of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange in the dock reading his papers as he appears at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court for his extradition hearing, in London, Monday, Feb. 24, 2020. The U.S. government and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange will face off Monday in a high-security London courthouse, a decade after WikiLeaks infuriated American officials by publishing a trove of classified military documents. (Elizabeth Cook/PA via AP)
February 24, 2020 - 7:31 am
LONDON (AP) — The U.S. government began outlining its extradition case against Julian Assange in a London court on Monday, arguing that the WikiLeaks founder is not a free-speech champion but an “ordinary” criminal who put many lives at risk with his secret-spilling. U.S. authorities want to try...
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FILE - In this June 13, 2019, file photo, Steve Marcinkus, an Investigator with the Office of the City Commissioners, demonstrates the ExpressVote XL voting machine at the Reading Terminal Market in Philadelphia. Nearly 1 in 5 U.S. voters will cast ballots this year on devices that look and feel like the discredited paperless voting machines they once used, yet leave a paper record of the vote. Computer security experts are warning that these so-called ballot-marking devices pose too much of a risk. Ballot-marking machines were initially developed not as primary vote-casting tools but as “accessible” alternatives for the disabled. They print out paper records that are scanned by optical readers that tabulate the vote. They cost at least twice as much as hand-marked paper ballots, which computer scientists prefer because paper can’t be hacked. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
February 23, 2020 - 4:30 pm
In the rush to replace insecure, unreliable electronic voting machines after Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential race, state and local officials have scrambled to acquire more trustworthy equipment for this year’s election, when U.S. intelligence agencies fear even worse problems...
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FILE - In this June 13, 2019, file photo, Steve Marcinkus, an Investigator with the Office of the City Commissioners, demonstrates the ExpressVote XL voting machine at the Reading Terminal Market in Philadelphia. Nearly 1 in 5 U.S. voters will cast ballots this year on devices that look and feel like the discredited paperless voting machines they once used, yet leave a paper record of the vote. Computer security experts are warning that these so-called ballot-marking devices pose too much of a risk. Ballot-marking machines were initially developed not as primary vote-casting tools but as “accessible” alternatives for the disabled. They print out paper records that are scanned by optical readers that tabulate the vote. They cost at least twice as much as hand-marked paper ballots, which computer scientists prefer because paper can’t be hacked. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
February 23, 2020 - 12:37 pm
In the rush to replace insecure, unreliable electronic voting machines after Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential race, state and local officials have scrambled to acquire more trustworthy equipment for this year’s election, when U.S. intelligence agencies fear even worse problems...
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FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2019, file photo, a digital voting machine sits on a table in Raleigh, N.C. North Carolina. In the rush to find reliable new voting machines, many state and local officials are turning to pricey models that some computer security experts see as risky. Called ballot-marking devices, the machines have touchscreens for registering voter choice. (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed, File)
February 23, 2020 - 11:45 am
In the rush to replace insecure, unreliable electronic voting machines after Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential race, state and local officials have scrambled to acquire more trustworthy equipment for this year’s election, when U.S. intelligence agencies fear even worse problems...
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