Gun politics

September 22, 2018 - 8:57 pm
BEIJING (AP) — China summoned the American ambassador and the defense attache and recalled its navy commander from a U.S. trip to deliver a strong protest against economic sanctions Washington lodged over the purchase of Russian fighter jets and surface-to-air missile equipment. The Defense...
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September 22, 2018 - 8:43 pm
BEIJING (AP) — China summoned the U.S. ambassador to deliver a strong protest against economic sanctions lodged over the purchase of Russian fighter jets and surface-to-air missile equipment. The Defense Ministry said the U.S. had no right to interfere in Chinese military cooperation with Russia...
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FILE - In this Sept. 7, 2018 file photo, New Hampshire Republicans Stewart Levenson, left, and state Rep. Steve Negron participate in the 2nd Congressional District debate at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, N.H. Levenson conceded the race to Negron in the Sept. 11 Republican primary. (Thomas Roy/The Union Leader via AP, Pool, File)
September 12, 2018 - 5:40 am
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — The Latest on the New Hampshire primary election (all times local): XX a.m. A state lawmaker who served in the Air Force and worked in the defense industry has won the Republican nomination for the state's 2nd Congressional District and will face Democratic incumbent Annie...
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In this photo taken on Friday, Sept. 7, 2012, Maria Butina walks with Alexander Torshin then a member of the Russian upper house of parliament in Moscow, Russia. When gun activist Maria Butina arrived in Washington in 2014 to network with the NRA, she was peddling a Russian gun rights movement that was already dead. Fellow gun enthusiasts and arms industry officials describe the strange trajectory of her Russian gun lobby project, which U.S. prosecutors say was a cover for a Russian influence campaign. Accused of working as a foreign agent, Butina faces a hearing Monday, Sept. 10 in Washington. (AP Photo/Pavel Ptitsin)
September 10, 2018 - 4:54 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge imposed a gag order Monday on the lawyers involved in the case of Maria Butina, a Russian gun rights activist accused of working in America as a secret agent for Moscow. U.S. District Judge Tanya Chutkan also denied a defense request that Butina, 29, be released on...
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FILE - In this file photo taken on Friday, June 12, 2011, Alexander Torshin, a member of the Federation Council, Russia's upper house of parliament, left, and then-Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin, attend an award ceremony in the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia. Accused of working as a foreign agent, gun activist Maria Butina faces a hearing Monday, Sept. 10 in Washington. U.S. court papers suggest the gun rights movement was a ruse, created to allow Butina and influential patron Alexander Torshin to infiltrate the NRA and pursue covert Russian back channels to American conservatives as Donald Trump rose to power. (Alexei Nikolsky, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP, File)
September 10, 2018 - 4:46 am
MOSCOW (AP) — As Siberian gun rights activist Maria Butina faces a hearing in Washington, here is a look at the unusual path that led to her arrest. She's accused of working as an undeclared foreign agent, based on FBI suspicions that she and patron Alexander Torshin sought to infiltrate the NRA...
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FILE - In this April 21, 2013 file photo, Maria Butina, leader of a pro-gun organization in Russia, speaks to a crowd during a rally in support of legalizing the possession of handguns in Moscow, Russia. Federal prosecutors concede that they misinterpreted text messages when they alleged that Butina, a Russian woman accused of working as a secret agent traded sex for access. Prosecutors acknowledged the mistake in a court filing in the case of Butina, charged with working as a covert agent and trying to establish back-channel lines of communication to the Kremlin. (AP Photo/File)
September 09, 2018 - 11:23 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal prosecutors are backtracking on their allegation that a Russian woman accused of working as a secret agent offered to trade sex for access, according to a Justice Department court filing. Prosecutors had earlier accused Maria Butina, a gun rights activist in U.S. custody...
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FILE - In this April 21, 2013 file photo, Maria Butina, leader of a pro-gun organization in Russia, speaks to a crowd during a rally in support of legalizing the possession of handguns in Moscow, Russia. Federal prosecutors concede that they misinterpreted text messages when they alleged that Butina, a Russian woman accused of working as a secret agent traded sex for access. Prosecutors acknowledged the mistake in a court filing in the case of Butina, charged with working as a covert agent and trying to establish back-channel lines of communication to the Kremlin. (AP Photo/File)
September 09, 2018 - 9:58 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal prosecutors concede they misinterpreted text messages when they alleged that a Russian woman accused of working as a secret agent offered to trade sex for access, according to a Justice Department court filing. Prosecutors had earlier accused Maria Butina, a gun rights...
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FILE - In this April 21, 2013 file photo, Maria Butina, leader of a pro-gun organization in Russia, speaks to a crowd during a rally in support of legalizing the possession of handguns in Moscow, Russia. Federal prosecutors concede that they misinterpreted text messages when they alleged that Butina, a Russian woman accused of working as a secret agent traded sex for access. Prosecutors acknowledged the mistake in a court filing in the case of Butina, charged with working as a covert agent and trying to establish back-channel lines of communication to the Kremlin. (AP Photo/File)
September 09, 2018 - 9:52 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal prosecutors concede they misinterpreted text messages when they alleged that a Russian woman accused of working as a secret agent offered to trade sex for access, according to a Justice Department court filing. Prosecutors had earlier accused Maria Butina, a gun rights...
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FILE - In this April 21, 2013 file photo, Maria Butina, leader of a pro-gun organization in Russia, speaks to a crowd during a rally in support of legalizing the possession of handguns in Moscow, Russia. Federal prosecutors concede that they misinterpreted text messages when they alleged that Butina, a Russian woman accused of working as a secret agent traded sex for access. Prosecutors acknowledged the mistake in a court filing in the case of Butina, charged with working as a covert agent and trying to establish back-channel lines of communication to the Kremlin. (AP Photo/File)
September 09, 2018 - 9:18 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal prosecutors concede that they misinterpreted text messages when they alleged that a Russian woman accused of working as a secret agent traded sex for access. Prosecutors acknowledged the mistake in a court filing this weekend in the case of Maria Butina, a gun rights...
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September 09, 2018 - 8:54 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal prosecutors concede that they misinterpreted text messages when they alleged that a Russian woman accused of working as a secret agent traded sex for access. Prosecutors acknowledged the mistake in a court filing this weekend in the case of Maria Butina, a gun rights...
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