Geology

FILE - In this Sept. 3, 2017, file photo, Earthquake and Volcano of the Korea Monitoring Division Director Ryoo Yong-gyu speaks to the media about North Korea's artificial earthquake with a map of the Korean peninsular in Seoul, South Korea. A study by Chinese geologists shows the mountain above North Korea's main nuclear test site has collapsed under the stress of the explosions, rendering it unsafe for further testing and necessitating monitoring for any leaking radiation. The findings by the scientists at the University of Science and Technology of China may shed new light on North Korean President Kim Jong Un's announcement that his country was ceasing its testing program.(AP Photo/Lee Jin-man, File)
April 26, 2018 - 4:51 am
BEIJING (AP) — Research by Chinese geologists suggests that the mountain above North Korea's main nuclear test site has likely collapsed, rendering it unsafe for further testing and requiring that it be monitored for any leaking radiation. The findings by the scientists at the University of Science...
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April 25, 2018 - 9:20 pm
BEIJING (AP) — A study by Chinese geologists shows the mountain above North Korea's main nuclear test site has collapsed under the stress of the explosions, rendering it unsafe for further testing and necessitating monitoring for any leaking radiation. The findings by the scientists at the...
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FILE - In this Oct. 30, 2012 file photo, the intersection of 8th Street and Atlantic Avenue is flooded in Ocean City, N.J., after the storm surge from Superstorm Sandy flooded much of the town. New satellite research shows that global warming is making seas rise at an ever increasing rate. Scientists say melting ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica is speeding up sea level rise so that by the year 2100 on average oceans will be two feet higher than today, probably even more. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)
February 12, 2018 - 3:56 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — New satellite research shows melting ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are speeding up already rising seas. At the current rate, the world's oceans on average will be at least 2 feet (61 centimeters) higher by the end of the century compared to today, according to researchers...
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