Geology

FILE - Jan. 13, 2018 file photo, U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres talks to the media during a join declaration with the Colombian president, in Bogota, Colombia. Saying humanity is waging war with the planet, the head of the United Nations isn’t planning to let just any world leader speak about climate change in Monday’s special “action summit.” Guterres says only those with new specific and bold plans can command the podium and the ever-warming world’s attention. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara, File)
September 22, 2019 - 3:51 pm
UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Saying humanity is waging war with the planet, the head of the United Nations isn't planning to let just any world leader speak about climate change at Monday's special "action summit." Only those with new, specific and bold plans can command the podium and the ever-warming...
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FILE - Jan. 13, 2018 file photo, U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres talks to the media during a join declaration with the Colombian president, in Bogota, Colombia. Saying humanity is waging war with the planet, the head of the United Nations isn’t planning to let just any world leader speak about climate change in Monday’s special “action summit.” Guterres says only those with new specific and bold plans can command the podium and the ever-warming world’s attention. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara, File)
September 22, 2019 - 10:52 am
UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Saying humanity is waging war with the planet, the head of the United Nations isn't planning to let just any world leader speak about climate change at Monday's special "action summit." Only those with new, specific and bold plans can command the podium and the ever-warming...
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In this Thursday, Aug. 1, 2019, photo, evidence of a Cascadia earthquake's awesome destructive power is visible at the beach in Neskowin, Ore. A "ghost forest" of Sitka spruces juts up from the beach in the tiny town. The trees were likely buried by tsunami debris 2,000 years earlier, and partially uncovered by storms in 1997. (AP Photo/Andrew Selsky)
August 16, 2019 - 9:30 am
NEWPORT, Ore. (AP) — With sunlight sparkling off surrounding Yaquina Bay, workers are putting up an ocean-studies building, smack in the middle of an area expected to one day be hit by a tsunami. Experts say it's only a matter of time before a shift in a major fault line off the Oregon coast causes...
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An iceberg floats near a cemetery in Kulusuk, Greenland, early Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019. Greenland has been melting faster in the last decade and this summer, it has seen two of the biggest melts on record since 2012. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
August 15, 2019 - 2:50 pm
ABOARD A NASA RESEARCH PLANE OVER GREENLAND (AP) — The fields of rippling ice 500 feet below the NASA plane give way to the blue-green of water dotted with irregular chunks of bleached-white ice, some the size of battleships, some as tall as 15-story buildings. Like nearly every other glacier on...
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FILE - In this Oct. 5, 2017, file photo, residents move a "no wake," sign through flood waters caused by king tides in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Federal scientists, according to a report released Wednesday, July 10, 2019, predict 40 places in the U.S. will experience higher than normal rates of so-called sunny day flooding this year due to rising sea levels and an abnormal El Nino weather system. (Joe Cavaretta/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)
July 10, 2019 - 3:21 pm
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — The federal government is warning Americans to brace for a "floodier" future. Government scientists predict 40 places in the U.S. will experience higher than normal rates of so-called sunny day flooding this year because of rising sea levels and an abnormal El Nino...
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FILE - In this Oct. 5, 2017, file photo, residents move a "no wake," sign through flood waters caused by king tides in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Federal scientists, according to a report released Wednesday, July 10, 2019, predict 40 places in the U.S. will experience higher than normal rates of so-called sunny day flooding this year due to rising sea levels and an abnormal El Nino weather system. (Joe Cavaretta/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)
July 10, 2019 - 2:53 pm
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — Federal scientists predict 40 places in the U.S. will experience higher than normal rates of so-called sunny day flooding this year due to rising sea levels and an abnormal El Nino weather system. A report released Wednesday by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric...
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FILE - In this Oct. 5, 2017, file photo, residents move a "no wake," sign through flood waters caused by king tides in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Federal scientists, according to a report released Wednesday, July 10, 2019, predict 40 places in the U.S. will experience higher than normal rates of so-called sunny day flooding this year due to rising sea levels and an abnormal El Nino weather system. (Joe Cavaretta/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)
July 10, 2019 - 12:15 pm
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — Federal scientists predict 40 places in the U.S. will experience higher than normal rates of so-called sunny day flooding this year because of rising sea levels and an abnormal El Nino weather system. A report released Wednesday by the National Oceanographic and...
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This undated photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey Astrogeology Science Center shows Apollo 15 astronauts Jim Irwin, left, and Dave Scott driving a prototype of a lunar rover in a volcanic cinder field east of Flagstaff, Ariz. The rover, named Grover, now is on display at the science center. (U.S. Geological Survey Astrogeology Science Center via AP)
July 08, 2019 - 10:31 am
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Before Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin knew they would be the first to walk on the moon, they took crash courses in geology at the Grand Canyon and a nearby impact crater that is the most well-preserved on Earth. Northern Arizona has had deep ties to the Apollo missions:...
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This undated photo provided by the European Space Agency, ESA, shows the surface of the Mars. Scientists say images of Martian craters taken by European and American space probes show there likely once was a planet-wide system of underground lakes. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS via AP)
March 01, 2019 - 12:08 pm
BERLIN (AP) — Scientists say images of craters taken by European and American space probes show there likely once was a planet-wide system of underground lakes on Mars. Data collected by NASA and ESA probes orbiting the red planet provide the first geological evidence for an ancient Martian...
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This undated photo provided by the European Space Agency, ESA, shows the surface of the Mars. Scientists say images of Martian craters taken by European and American space probes show there likely once was a planet-wide system of underground lakes. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS via AP)
March 01, 2019 - 11:46 am
BERLIN (AP) — Scientists say images of craters taken by European and American space probes show there likely once was a planet-wide system of underground lakes on Mars. Data collected by NASA and ESA probes orbiting the red planet provide the first geological evidence for an ancient Martian...
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