Genetics

An unmodified, open-pollinated American chestnut bur grows on a tree at the State University of New York's College of Environmental Science & Forestry Lafayette Road Experiment Station in Syracuse, N.Y., Monday, Sept. 30, 2019. The ESF American Chestnut Research & Restoration Project researchers have been able to add a gene to American chestnuts that give the trees resistance to a blight that decimated the trees in the 20th century. (AP Photo/Adrian Kraus)
November 06, 2019 - 4:22 pm
SYRACUSE, N.Y. (AP) — Chestnuts harvested from high branches on a chilly fall morning look typical: they're marble sized, russet colored and nestled in prickly burs. But many are like no other nuts in nature. In a feat of genetic engineering, about half the chestnuts collected at this college...
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An unmodified, open-pollinated American chestnut bur grows on a tree at the State University of New York's College of Environmental Science & Forestry Lafayette Road Experiment Station in Syracuse, N.Y., Monday, Sept. 30, 2019. The ESF American Chestnut Research & Restoration Project researchers have been able to add a gene to American chestnuts that give the trees resistance to a blight that decimated the trees in the 20th century. (AP Photo/Adrian Kraus)
November 06, 2019 - 1:14 am
SYRACUSE, N.Y. (AP) — Can biotechnology bring back the American chestnut tree? Researchers at New York state's College of Environmental Science and Forestry will soon seek federal clearance to distribute thousands of modified trees as part of a restoration effort. The precedent-setting case adds...
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FILE- In this March 27, 2019, file photo, vials of measles, mumps and rubella vaccine sit in a cooler at the Rockland County Health Department in Pomona, N.Y. Research released on Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019, shows yet another reason to vaccinate children against measles. After a bout of measles, youngsters are more vulnerable to other germs _ from chickenpox to strep _ that they once could fend off. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
October 31, 2019 - 2:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Measles has a stealth side effect: New research shows it erases much of the immune system's memory of how to fight other germs, so children recover only to be left more vulnerable to bugs like flu or strep. Scientists dubbed the startling findings "immune amnesia." The body can...
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This undated photo provided by Johns Hopkins University shows Gregg L. Semenza at the university in Baltimore. Semenza, a Johns Hopkins University researcher, was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine on Monday, Oct. 7, 2019. He will share the prize with Drs. William G. Kaelin Jr. and Peter J. Ratcliffe for their discoveries of how cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability, the Nobel Committee announced Monday. (Johns Hopkins University via AP)
October 07, 2019 - 8:48 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — The Latest on the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology (all times local): 2:40 p.m. Dr. Gregg Semenza, a top researcher at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, says he was awakened by a call from Stockholm shortly before 4 a.m. with the good news that he is one of three...
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Professor Randall Johnson of the Nobel Commitee, right, speaks during a news conference in Stockholm, Sweden, Monday Oct. 7, 2019. The 2019 Nobel laureates in Physiology or Medicine has been awarded to scientists Gregg L. Semenza, Peter J. Ratcliffe and William G. Kaelin Jr. receiving the award jointly for their discoveries of "how cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability". (Pontus Lundahl/TT via AP)
October 07, 2019 - 7:09 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — The Latest on the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology (all times local): 1:05 p.m. The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine is celebrating one of its top researchers, Dr. Gregg Semenza, who shares this year's Nobel Prize for medicine for his work on how genes respond to...
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This image made from the National Academy of Sciences website on Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019 shows part of a video of people discussing gene editing and designer babies. The video gives the inaccurate impression that gene editing can give positive traits without any potential downsides _ “the definition of hubris,” said Harvard Medical School dean Dr. George Q. Daley, who also has been involved in academy work. “We are not there yet.” (National Academy of Sciences via AP)
October 02, 2019 - 9:21 pm
A government-funded group that’s leading efforts to set standards for gene editing has pulled a video it posted in the wake of concern about how it portrayed the ethically dicey science and its possible use to make designer babies. The National Academy of Sciences posted the video earlier this week...
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This image made from the National Academy of Sciences website on Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019 shows part of a video of people discussing gene editing and designer babies. The video gives the inaccurate impression that gene editing can give positive traits without any potential downsides _ “the definition of hubris,” said Harvard Medical School dean Dr. George Q. Daley, who also has been involved in academy work. “We are not there yet.” (National Academy of Sciences via AP)
October 02, 2019 - 8:53 pm
A government-funded group that’s leading efforts to set standards for gene editing has pulled a video it posted in the wake of concern about how it portrayed the ethically dicey science and its possible use to make designer babies. The National Academy of Sciences posted the video earlier this week...
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This image made from the National Academy of Sciences website on Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019 shows part of a video of people discussing gene editing and designer babies. The video gives the inaccurate impression that gene editing can give positive traits without any potential downsides _ “the definition of hubris,” said Harvard Medical School dean Dr. George Q. Daley, who also has been involved in academy work. “We are not there yet.” (National Academy of Sciences via AP)
October 02, 2019 - 1:54 pm
A new video showing people casually discussing gene editing and designer babies is making waves because of its source: the government-funded group leading efforts to set standards for the ethically dicey science. The National Academy of Sciences posted the video earlier this week along with a tweet...
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In this Aug. 2, 2018 file photo provided by Dawn Manteufel, Greg Manteufel lays in his hospital bed at Froedtert Hospital in Milwaukee. He lost parts of his arms and legs, as well as the skin of his nose and part of his upper lip from capnocytophaga, a bacteria commonly found in the saliva or cats and dogs which almost never leads to people getting sick, unless the person has a compromised immune system. Manteufel was perfectly healthy when he got sick in June of 2018. Over the last seven years, a team of researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, connected to Harvard Medical School, have tested other healthy people who were affected and developed a theory on why they were affected- a gene change in all the victims. (Dawn Manteufel via AP)
September 27, 2019 - 8:05 am
WEST BEND, Wis. (AP) — It's hard to regard Ellie as a menace. When Greg Manteufel is frustrated or feeling down, she sits by him. At night, she sleeps under his covers. At dinner, she's there next to him, knowing he'll throw something her way. She belies the stereotype of the vicious pit bull. "We...
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In this Aug. 2, 2018 file photo provided by Dawn Manteufel, Greg Manteufel lays in his hospital bed at Froedtert Hospital in Milwaukee. He lost parts of his arms and legs, as well as the skin of his nose and part of his upper lip from capnocytophaga, a bacteria commonly found in the saliva or cats and dogs which almost never leads to people getting sick, unless the person has a compromised immune system. Manteufel was perfectly healthy when he got sick in June of 2018. Over the last seven years, a team of researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, connected to Harvard Medical School, have tested other healthy people who were affected and developed a theory on why they were affected- a gene change in all the victims. (Dawn Manteufel via AP)
September 27, 2019 - 7:57 am
WEST BEND, Wis. (AP) — It's hard to regard Ellie as a menace. When Greg Manteufel is frustrated or feeling down, she sits by him. At night, she sleeps under his covers. At dinner, she's there next to him, knowing he'll throw something her way. She belies the stereotype of the vicious pit bull. "We...
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