Genetics

This 2011 electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control shows HIV virions. On Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2019, scientists are reporting the first use of the gene-editing tool CRISPR to try to cure a patient's HIV infection by providing blood cells that have been altered to resist the AIDS virus. (Maureen Metcalfe, Tom Hodge/CDC via AP)
September 11, 2019 - 5:03 pm
Scientists are reporting the first use of the gene-editing tool CRISPR to try to cure a patient's HIV infection by providing blood cells that were altered to resist the AIDS virus. The gene-editing tool has long been used in research labs, and a Chinese scientist was scorned last year when he...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, July 15, 2015 file photo, a lesbian couple holds hands in Salt Lake City. Released on Thursday, Aug. 29, 2019, the largest study of its kind found new evidence that genes contribute to same-sex sexual behavior, echoing research that says there is no single “gay gene.” (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
August 29, 2019 - 2:22 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — The largest study of its kind found new evidence that genes contribute to same-sex sexual behavior, but it echoes research that says there are no specific genes that make people gay. The genome-wide research on DNA from nearly half a million U.S. and U.K. adults identified five...
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August 29, 2019 - 2:10 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — The largest study of its kind found new evidence that genes contribute to same-sex sexual behavior, but it echoes research that says there are no specific genes that make people gay. The genome-wide research on DNA from nearly half a million U.S. and U.K. adults identified five...
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Cheryl Hayashi uses a microscope to work on a spider in her lab at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Hayashi has collected spider silk glands of about 50 species, just a small dent in the more than 48,000 spider species known worldwide. (AP Photo/Jeremy Rehm)
August 14, 2019 - 12:11 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — With two pairs of fine-tipped tweezers and the hands of a surgeon, Cheryl Hayashi began dissecting the body of a silver garden spider under her microscope. In just a few minutes she found what she was seeking: hundreds of silk glands, the organs spiders use to make their webs. Some...
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FILE - This April 12, 2018 file photo shows the eye of a woman in New York. Patients are about to be enrolled in the first study to test gene editing inside the body to try to cure an inherited form of blindness. People with the disease have healthy eyes but lack a gene that converts light into signals to the brain that enable sight. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison, File)
July 25, 2019 - 12:08 pm
Patients are about to be enrolled in the first study to test a gene-editing technique known as CRISPR inside the body to try to cure an inherited form of blindness. People with the disease have normal eyes but lack a gene that converts light into signals to the brain that enable sight. The...
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This microscope image shows the 46 human chromosomes, blue, with telomeres appearing as white pinpoints. Research released on Tuesday, July 16, 2019 offers some of the first biological clues to why women may be more likely than men to develop Alzheimer's disease, and how this most common form of dementia varies by gender. (Hesed Padilla-Nash, Thomas Ried/National Cancer Institute/National Institutes of Health via AP)
July 16, 2019 - 3:10 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — New research gives some biological clues to why women may be more likely than men to develop Alzheimer's disease and how this most common form of dementia varies by sex. At the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Los Angeles on Tuesday, scientists offered evidence...
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This microscope image shows the 46 human chromosomes, blue, with telomeres appearing as white pinpoints. Research released on Tuesday, July 16, 2019 offers some of the first biological clues to why women may be more likely than men to develop Alzheimer's disease, and how this most common form of dementia varies by gender. (Hesed Padilla-Nash, Thomas Ried/National Cancer Institute/National Institutes of Health via AP)
July 16, 2019 - 2:45 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — New research gives some biological clues to why women may be more likely than men to develop Alzheimer's disease and how this most common form of dementia varies by sex. At the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Los Angeles on Tuesday, scientists offered evidence...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018 file photo, an elderly couple walks past the Berlaymont building, the European Commission headquarters, in Brussels. Research released on Sunday, July 14, 2019 suggests that a healthy lifestyle can cut the risk of developing Alzheimer's even if you've inherited genes that raise your risk for the mind-destroying disease. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco, File)
July 14, 2019 - 1:28 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A healthy lifestyle can cut your risk of developing Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia even if you have genes that raise your risk for these mind-destroying diseases, a large study has found. People with high genetic risk and poor health habits were about three times more...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018 file photo, an elderly couple walks past the Berlaymont building, the European Commission headquarters, in Brussels. Research released on Sunday, July 14, 2019 suggests that a healthy lifestyle can cut the risk of developing Alzheimer's even if you've inherited genes that raise your risk for the mind-destroying disease. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco, File)
July 14, 2019 - 12:35 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A healthy lifestyle can cut your risk of developing Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia even if you have genes that raise your risk for these mind-destroying diseases, a large study has found. People with high genetic risk and poor health habits were about three times more...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018 file photo, an elderly couple walks past the Berlaymont building, the European Commission headquarters, in Brussels. Research released on Sunday, July 14, 2019 suggests that a healthy lifestyle can cut the risk of developing Alzheimer's even if you've inherited genes that raise your risk for the mind-destroying disease. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco, File)
July 14, 2019 - 12:21 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A healthy lifestyle can cut your risk of developing Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia even if you have genes that raise your risk for these mind-destroying diseases, a large study has found. People with high genetic risk and poor health habits were about three times more...
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