Gene therapy

FILE - In this Feb. 14, 2019, file photo, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Administrator Seema Verma speaks during a news conference in Washington. Expanding access to a promising but costly treatment, Medicare said Aug. 7, it will cover for some blood cancers a breakthrough gene therapy that revs up a patient’s own immune cells to destroy malignancies. Verma said the decision will provide consistent and predictable access nationwide, opening up treatment options for some patients "who had nowhere else to turn." (AP Photo/Kevin Wolf, File)
August 07, 2019 - 6:44 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Expanding access to a promising but costly treatment, Medicare said Wednesday it will cover for some blood cancers a breakthrough gene therapy that revs up a patient's own immune cells to destroy malignancies. Officials said Medicare will cover CAR-T cell therapies for certain...
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This photo provided by Novartis shows their gene therapy medicine Zolgensma. U.S. regulators want to know why Novartis didn't disclose a problem with testing data until after they approved the Swiss drugmaker’s $2.125 million gene therapy. On Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2019, the Food and Drug Administration said the questionable data involves testing of the therapy, Zologensma, on animals, not on patients. (Novartis via AP)
August 06, 2019 - 6:51 pm
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — U.S. regulators want to know why Novartis didn't disclose a problem with testing data until after the Swiss drugmaker's $2.1 million gene therapy was approved. The Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday the manipulated data involved testing in animals, not patients, and it's...
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This photo provided by Novartis shows their gene therapy medicine Zolgensma. U.S. regulators want to know why Novartis didn't disclose a problem with testing data until after they approved the Swiss drugmaker’s $2.125 million gene therapy. On Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2019, the Food and Drug Administration said the questionable data involves testing of the therapy, Zologensma, on animals, not on patients. (Novartis via AP)
August 06, 2019 - 6:24 pm
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — U.S. regulators want to know why Novartis didn't disclose a problem with testing data until after the Swiss drugmaker's $2.1 million gene therapy was approved. The Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday the manipulated data involved testing in animals, not patients, and it's...
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In this June 20, 2019 photo, the Capitol is seen from the roof of the Canadian Embassy in Washington. Health care is on the agenda for Congress when lawmakers return, and it’s not another battle over the Obama-era Affordable Care Act. Instead of dealing with the uninsured, lawmakers are trying to bring down costs for people who already have coverage. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
July 07, 2019 - 9:00 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawmakers are trying to set aside their irreconcilable differences over the Obama-era Affordable Care Act and work to reach bipartisan agreement on a more immediate health care issue, lowering costs for people who already have coverage. Returning from their Fourth of July recess,...
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This photo provided by Novartis shows Zolgensma. The one-time gene therapy developed by Novartis, Zolgensma, will cost $2.125 million. It treats a rare condition called spinal muscular atrophy, or SMA, which strikes about 400 babies born in the U.S. each year. The therapy, given in a one-hour infusion, was approved for children under age 2 and will be available within two weeks. (Novartis via AP)
May 24, 2019 - 5:51 pm
U.S. regulators have approved the most expensive medicine ever, for a rare disorder that destroys a baby's muscle control and kills nearly all of those with the most common type of the disease within a couple of years. The treatment is priced at $2.125 million. Out-of-pocket costs for patients will...
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This photo provided by Novartis shows Zolgensma. The one-time gene therapy developed by Novartis, Zolgensma, will cost $2.125 million. It treats a rare condition called spinal muscular atrophy, or SMA, which strikes about 400 babies born in the U.S. each year. The therapy, given in a one-hour infusion, was approved for children under age 2 and will be available within two weeks. (Novartis via AP)
May 24, 2019 - 2:35 pm
U.S. regulators have approved the most expensive medicine ever, for a disorder that destroys a baby's muscle control and kills nearly all of those with the most common variant of the disease within a couple years. The treatment is priced at $2.125 million. Out-of-pocket costs for patients will vary...
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May 24, 2019 - 1:41 pm
U.S. regulators have approved the most expensive medicine ever, a therapy meant to cure a disorder that rapidly destroys a baby's muscle control and kills most within a couple years. The one-time gene therapy developed by Novartis, Zolgensma (zohl-JEN-smah), will cost $2.125 million. It treats a...
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FILE- In this Nov. 20, 2018, file photo an American flag flies outside New York Stock Exchange. Stocks are opening broadly higher on Wall Street following reports that the U.S. and China are getting closer to a deal on trade. Technology stocks, industrial and internet companies were among the biggest gainers in early trading Monday, March 4, 2019. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)
March 04, 2019 - 5:03 pm
Health care companies led stocks lower on Wall Street Monday as investors waited for more details on reports that the U.S. and China are moving closer to a deal to resolve their costly trade dispute. The sell-off was most pronounced in sectors that have shown strong gains over the last two months,...
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FILE- In this Nov. 20, 2018, file photo an American flag flies outside New York Stock Exchange. Stocks are opening broadly higher on Wall Street following reports that the U.S. and China are getting closer to a deal on trade. Technology stocks, industrial and internet companies were among the biggest gainers in early trading Monday, March 4, 2019. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)
March 04, 2019 - 1:43 pm
Stocks declined broadly on Wall Street Monday afternoon, knocking more than 300 points off the Dow Jones Industrial Average. Health care, technology and financial stocks took the heaviest losses. The broad sell-off came as investors waited for more details on reports that the U.S. and China are...
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FILE- In this Nov. 20, 2018, file photo an American flag flies outside New York Stock Exchange. Stocks are opening broadly higher on Wall Street following reports that the U.S. and China are getting closer to a deal on trade. Technology stocks, industrial and internet companies were among the biggest gainers in early trading Monday, March 4, 2019. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)
March 04, 2019 - 12:16 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are edging lower on Wall Street in afternoon trading as investors wait for more details on reports that the U.S. and China are moving closer to a deal to resolve their costly trade dispute. Stocks fell back in afternoon trading, erasing an early rally. The market is still...
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