Freedom of the press

FILE - This March 28, 2018, file photo shows a Facebook logo at the company's headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. Facebook’s plan to create a digital currency used across the world is already raising concern with financial regulators and privacy experts. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
June 24, 2019 - 5:05 am
LONDON (AP) — A senior Facebook executive says the social media site is in favor of regulation to address some of the dark problems of the internet. Nick Clegg, the former leader of the U.K. Liberal Democrat party who now heads global affairs for Facebook, says it is not "for private companies" to...
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FILE - This March 28, 2018, file photo shows a Facebook logo at the company's headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. Facebook’s plan to create a digital currency used across the world is already raising concern with financial regulators and privacy experts. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
June 24, 2019 - 4:38 am
LONDON (AP) — A senior Facebook executive says the social media site is in favor of regulation to address some of the dark problems of the internet. Nick Clegg, the former leader of the U.K. Liberal Democrat party who now heads global affairs for Facebook, says it is not "for private companies" to...
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FILE - In this file photo dated Wednesday May 1, 2019, buildings are reflected in the window as WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is taken from court, where he appeared on charges of jumping British bail seven years ago, in London. 47-year old Assange is expected to appear via a video link at court Friday June 14, 2019, as he continues his fight against extradition to the United States, where he faces prosecution under the Espionage Act. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, FILE)
June 14, 2019 - 7:50 am
LONDON (AP) — A British court has set a date early next year for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange to face a U.S. extradition attempt over his role in revealing classified government and military information. The judge at Westminster Magistrates' Court on Friday set a full extradition hearing for...
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FILE - In this April 10, 2018, file photo, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington. Weeks after Facebook refused to remove a doctored video of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi slurring her words, Zuckerberg is getting a taste of his own medicine: fake footage showing him gloating over his one-man domination of the world. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
June 12, 2019 - 4:58 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Three weeks after Facebook refused to remove a doctored video of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi slurring her words, Mark Zuckerberg is getting a taste of his own medicine: fake footage showing him gloating over his one-man domination of the world. It's the latest flap over deviously...
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Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, second from right, meets with representatives of Rafael, a military and defense technologies development firm, during a trade visit to Israel Monday May 27, 2019. DeSantis is leading a delegation on a four-day trade mission to help boost the state's economy and solidify its bonds with Israel. (Jeff Schweers/Tallahassee Democrat via AP)
May 29, 2019 - 11:21 am
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Gov. Ron DeSantis and the Florida Cabinet met in Israel on Wednesday, waving away complaints that the setting was illegal. They presented a proclamation of support for Israel and heard from Israelis on several issues important to Florida. The Republican governor then signed...
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FILE - In this May 1, 2019, file photo, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange puts his fist up as he is taken from court in London. The Justice Department has charged Assange with receiving and publishing classified information. The charges are contained in a new, 18-count indictment announced May 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)
May 24, 2019 - 3:38 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — In a case with significant First Amendment implications, the U.S. filed new charges Thursday against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, accusing him of violating the Espionage Act by publishing secret documents containing the names of confidential military and diplomatic sources...
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FILE - In this May 1, 2019, file photo, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange puts his fist up as he is taken from court in London. The Justice Department has charged Assange with receiving and publishing classified information. The charges are contained in a new, 18-count indictment announced May 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)
May 24, 2019 - 12:38 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — In a case with significant First Amendment implications, the U.S. filed new charges Thursday against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, accusing him of violating the Espionage Act by publishing secret documents containing the names of confidential military and diplomatic sources...
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FILE - In this May 1, 2019, file photo, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange puts his fist up as he is taken from court in London. The Justice Department has charged Assange with receiving and publishing classified information. The charges are contained in a new, 18-count indictment announced May 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)
May 23, 2019 - 10:18 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — In a case with significant First Amendment implications, the U.S. filed new charges Thursday against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, accusing him of violating the Espionage Act by publishing secret documents containing the names of confidential military and diplomatic sources...
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FILE - In this May 1, 2019, file photo, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange puts his fist up as he is taken from court in London. The Justice Department has charged Assange with receiving and publishing classified information. The charges are contained in a new, 18-count indictment announced May 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)
May 23, 2019 - 7:17 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — In a case with significant First Amendment implications, the U.S. filed new charges Thursday against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, accusing him of violating the Espionage Act by publishing secret documents containing the names of confidential military and diplomatic sources...
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In this photo taken Tuesday, May 21, 2019, from left, David Snyder, an attorney with the First Amendment Coalition, attorney Duffy Carolan, and Thomas Burke, attorney for freelance journalist Bryan Carmody, talk outside a courtroom before a hearing in San Francisco. Advocates of the press pushed back against a San Francisco police chief who said a freelance journalist had "crossed the line" in conspiring to steal a police report, saying that it is not a crime to disclose a public record. Carolan, who is representing several media organizations siding with the independent reporter, says that the public has constitutional rights to access public records. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
May 23, 2019 - 9:49 am
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Media law experts have criticized a claim by San Francisco's police chief that a freelance journalist allegedly conspired to steal a police report, saying that it is not a crime to disclose a public record. San Francisco attorney Duffy Carolan, who represents several media...
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