Fossils

FILE - This June 3, 2014, file photo shows a panoramic view of the Paradise Fossil Plant in Drakesboro Ky. President Donald Trump's vow to save the coal industry will be tested this week when a utility board he appoints weighs whether to close a coal-fired power plant in Kentucky whose suppliers include a mine owned by one of his campaign donors. An environmental assessment by the Tennessee Valley Authority recommends shuttering the remaining coal-fired unit at the Paradise Fossil Plant in Muhlenberg County. The board could vote on Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Dylan Lovan, File)
February 14, 2019 - 4:08 pm
FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — A federal utility board voted Thursday to close a coal-fired power plant in Kentucky, rejecting pleas from President Donald Trump and U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and handing the coal industry a defeat in its backyard. The Tennessee Valley Authority voted to...
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FILE - This June 3, 2014, file photo shows a panoramic view of the Paradise Fossil Plant in Drakesboro Ky. President Donald Trump's vow to save the coal industry will be tested this week when a utility board he appoints weighs whether to close a coal-fired power plant in Kentucky whose suppliers include a mine owned by one of his campaign donors. An environmental assessment by the Tennessee Valley Authority recommends shuttering the remaining coal-fired unit at the Paradise Fossil Plant in Muhlenberg County. The board could vote on Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Dylan Lovan, File)
February 14, 2019 - 12:26 pm
FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — A federal utility board voted Thursday to close a coal-fired power plant in Kentucky, despite objections from President Donald Trump and U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, in a move the board says will save its more than 10 million customers $320 million. The...
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FILE - This June 3, 2014, file photo shows a panoramic view of the Paradise Fossil Plant in Drakesboro Ky. President Donald Trump's vow to save the coal industry will be tested this week when a utility board he appoints weighs whether to close a coal-fired power plant in Kentucky whose suppliers include a mine owned by one of his campaign donors. An environmental assessment by the Tennessee Valley Authority recommends shuttering the remaining coal-fired unit at the Paradise Fossil Plant in Muhlenberg County. The board could vote on Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Dylan Lovan, File)
February 13, 2019 - 4:21 pm
FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — President Donald Trump's support for the coal industry — and for a particular power plant — will face a test this week when a utility board he appoints considers whether to close a coal-fired Kentucky plant whose suppliers include a mine owned by one of his campaign donors. An...
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FILE - This June 3, 2014, file photo shows a panoramic view of the Paradise Fossil Plant in Drakesboro Ky. President Donald Trump's vow to save the coal industry will be tested this week when a utility board he appoints weighs whether to close a coal-fired power plant in Kentucky whose suppliers include a mine owned by one of his campaign donors. An environmental assessment by the Tennessee Valley Authority recommends shuttering the remaining coal-fired unit at the Paradise Fossil Plant in Muhlenberg County. The board could vote on Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Dylan Lovan, File)
February 13, 2019 - 3:52 pm
FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — President Donald Trump's support for the coal industry — and for a particular power plant — will face a test this week when a utility board he appoints considers whether to close a coal-fired Kentucky plant whose suppliers include a mine owned by one of his campaign donors...
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February 13, 2019 - 2:53 pm
FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — President Donald Trump's vow to save the coal industry will be tested this week — and so will the impact of his recent comments favoring a particular power plant — when a utility board he appoints weighs whether to close the coal-fired Kentucky plant whose suppliers include a...
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This image provided by the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs shows paleontology curator Spencer Lucas talking about Gordodon, a specialized plant-eating reptile, during an interview outside the New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science in Albuquerque, N.M. Fossil bones were discovered near Alamogordo by Ethan Schuth while on a University of Oklahoma geology class field trip in 2013. The bones, part of an exquisitely preserved but incomplete skeleton, are on display at the museum. (New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs via AP)
November 23, 2018 - 6:40 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The earliest known example of a plant-eating reptile has been found in the fossil record in southern New Mexico, the New Mexico Museum of Natural History said. The museum made the announcement this week , saying the unique structure of the skull, jaws and teeth of the sail-...
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November 21, 2018 - 10:14 am
FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — A doctor in Texas with a passion for paleontology is challenging the federal government after authorities seized a 70 million-year-old dinosaur skull from his fossil collection. Dr. James Godwin argues that the government waited too long to file a forfeiture claim after it...
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November 21, 2018 - 8:37 am
FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — A doctor in Texas with a passion for paleontology is challenging the federal government after authorities seized a 70 million-year-old dinosaur skull from his fossil collection. Dr. James Godwin argues that the government waited too long to file a forfeiture claim after it...
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In this Sept. 13, 2018, photo, paleontologist Xu Xing brushes away sediment to examine fossils recovered from a dig site in Yanji, China. The excavation, led by Xu, begun after construction crews erecting new apartment buildings accidentally uncovered dinosaur bones and other fossils, dating back 100 million years. (AP Photo/Christina Larson)
October 25, 2018 - 1:58 am
YANJI, China (AP) — At the end of a street of newly built high-rises in the northern Chinese city of Yanji stands an exposed cliff face, where paleontologists scrape away 100 million-year-old rock in search of prehistoric bones. Like many fossil excavation sites in China, this one was discovered by...
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FILE - In this July 2012 photo provided by Laure Gauthiez, scientists Vickie Bennett, Allen Nutman and Clark Friend examine rocks in Greenland. A new study says what were billed as the oldest fossils on Earth may just be some rocks. Two years ago, a team of Australian scientists, including Nutman, found odd structures in Greenland that they said were partly a leftover from microbes that lived on an ancient seafloor. The tiny structures were said to be 3.7 billion years old. But different researchers concluded in a study published Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2018, that the structures were likely not fossils. The Australian scientists defended their work. (Laure Gauthiez/The Australian National University via AP, File)
October 17, 2018 - 1:48 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — What were billed as the oldest fossils on Earth may just be some rocks, according to a new study. Two years ago, a team of Australian scientists found odd structures in Greenland that they said were partly leftovers from microbes that lived on an ancient seafloor. They were said...
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