Fossils

This image provided by HHMI Tangled Bank Studios in October 2019 shows a rendering of the ancient Carsioptychus mammal taken from the PBS NOVA special, Rise of the Mammals. In this recreation, Carsioptychus coarctatus eats plants in a newly diversified forest, 300,000 years after the mass extinction that wiped out the dinosaurs. (Jellyfish Pictures/HHMI Tangled Bank Studios via AP)
October 24, 2019 - 2:03 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A remarkable trove of fossils from Colorado has revealed details of how mammals grew larger and plants evolved after the cataclysm that killed off the dinosaurs. The thousands of specimens let scientists trace that history over a span of 1 million years, a mere eyeblink in Earth's...
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This image provided by HHMI Tangled Bank Studios in October 2019 shows a rendering of the ancient Carsioptychus mammal taken from the PBS NOVA special, Rise of the Mammals. In this recreation, Carsioptychus coarctatus eats plants in a newly diversified forest, 300,000 years after the mass extinction that wiped out the dinosaurs. (Jellyfish Pictures/HHMI Tangled Bank Studios via AP)
October 24, 2019 - 2:01 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A trove of fossils from Colorado has revealed details of how mammals grew larger and plants evolved after the cataclysm that killed off the dinosaurs. The fossils, recovered from an area near Colorado Springs, trace that history over a span of 1 million years. That's a mere eyeblink...
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File-Picture taken in August 2017 show linear clusters of trilobites (arthropods) on the surface of the rock slab. These fossils come the Fezouata Shale in Morocco (near Zagora). Their age is 480 million years. The trilobites are all oriented towards the same direction. The head part has a long spine in the front. There are also two lateral spines along the animal's body. (AP Photo/Jean Vannier)
October 17, 2019 - 11:55 am
BERLIN (AP) — Ever felt like you've been queuing forever? Scientists say fossils found in Morocco suggest the practice of forming orderly lines may date back 480 million years and could have had evolutionary advantages. Their study, published Thursday in the journal Scientific Reports, describes...
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This image provided by Hebrew University in Jerusalem shows a statue reconstruction of a juvenile female Denisovan based on a skeletal profile reconstructed from ancient DNA methylation maps. Scientists say they’ve recreated a skull and some other features of a mysterious, extinct cousin of Neanderthals by analyzing its DNA. The genetic material came from the finger bone of a female member of the Denisovans, a population known mostly from small bone fragments and teeth recovered in Siberia’s Denisova Cave. The the renderings that include skin and hair from the profile skeletal profile are not part of the study itself, but rather are based on the study results. ( Maayan Harel/Hebrew University in Jerusalem via AP)
September 19, 2019 - 11:05 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists say they've deciphered features of the skull and some other details of a mysterious, extinct cousin of Neanderthals by analyzing its DNA. The genetic material came from the finger bone of a female member of the Denisovans, a population known mostly from small bone...
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FILE - This July 9, 2017 file photo, shows a view of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in Utah. The U.S. government's final management plan for lands in and around the Utah national monument that President Donald Trump downsized is light on new protections for the cliffs, canyons, waterfalls and arches found there, but it does include a few more safeguards than were in a proposal last year. A summary the Bureau of Land Management provided to The Associated Press shows that the plan for the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in southwestern Utah codifies that the lands cut out of the monument will be open to mineral extraction such as oil, gas and coal as expected. (Spenser Heaps/The Deseret News via AP, File)
August 23, 2019 - 4:18 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A new U.S. government management plan unveiled Friday clears the way for coal mining and oil and gas drilling on land that used to be off limits as part of a sprawling national monument in Utah before President Donald Trump downsized the protected area two years ago. The plan...
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FILE - This July 9, 2017 file photo, shows a view of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in Utah. The U.S. government's final management plan for lands in and around the Utah national monument that President Donald Trump downsized is light on new protections for the cliffs, canyons, waterfalls and arches found there, but it does include a few more safeguards than were in a proposal last year. A summary the Bureau of Land Management provided to The Associated Press shows that the plan for the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in southwestern Utah codifies that the lands cut out of the monument will be open to mineral extraction such as oil, gas and coal as expected. (Spenser Heaps/The Deseret News via AP, File)
August 23, 2019 - 7:12 am
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — The U.S. government's final management plan for lands in and around a Utah national monument that President Donald Trump downsized doesn't include many new protections for the cliffs, canyons, waterfalls and arches found there, but it does include a few more safeguards than...
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FILE - This July 9, 2017 file photo, shows a view of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in Utah. The U.S. government's final management plan for lands in and around the Utah national monument that President Donald Trump downsized is light on new protections for the cliffs, canyons, waterfalls and arches found there, but it does include a few more safeguards than were in a proposal last year. A summary the Bureau of Land Management provided to The Associated Press shows that the plan for the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in southwestern Utah codifies that the lands cut out of the monument will be open to mineral extraction such as oil, gas and coal as expected. (Spenser Heaps/The Deseret News via AP, File)
August 23, 2019 - 2:06 am
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — The U.S. government's final management plan for lands in and around a Utah national monument that President Donald Trump downsized doesn't include many new protections for the cliffs, canyons, waterfalls and arches found there, but it does include a few more safeguards than...
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Dr. Paul Scofield, senior curator natural history at Canterbury Museum, holds the fossil, a tibiotarsus, top, next to a similar bone of an Emperor Penguin in Christchurch, New Zealand, Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2019. Scientists in New Zealand say they've found fossilized bones from an extinct monster penguin that was about the size of a human and swam the oceans some 60 million years ago. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)
August 14, 2019 - 8:15 am
WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — Scientists in New Zealand said Wednesday they've found fossilized bones from an extinct monster penguin that was about the size of an adult human and swam the oceans some 60 million years ago. They said the previously undiscovered species is believed to have stood...
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Dr. Paul Scofield, senior curator natural history at Canterbury Museum, holds the fossil, a tibiotarsus, top, next to a similar bone of an Emperor Penguin in Christchurch, New Zealand, Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2019. Scientists in New Zealand say they've found fossilized bones from an extinct monster penguin that was about the size of a human and swam the oceans some 60 million years ago. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)
August 14, 2019 - 7:52 am
WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — Scientists in New Zealand said Wednesday they've found fossilized bones from an extinct monster penguin that was about the size of an adult human and swam the oceans some 60 million years ago. They said the previously undiscovered species is believed to have stood...
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FILE - In this Jan. 25, 2017 file photo, heavy equipment is used at an ash storage site at Gallatin Fossil Plant in Gallatin, Tenn. The nation’s largest public utility has agreed to dig up and remove about 12 million cubic yards of coal ash from unlined pits at Gallatin Fossil Plant. In a Thursday, June 13, 2019 settlement, the Tennessee Valley Authority says it will excavate a majority of coal ash at its Gallatin Fossil Plant. .(AP Photo/Mark Humphrey, File)
June 13, 2019 - 7:06 pm
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The nation's largest public utility on Thursday agreed to dig up and remove about 12 million cubic yards (9.2 million cubic meters) of coal ash from unlined pits at a Tennessee coal-burning power plant. Prompted by two environmental groups, the state sued the Tennessee...
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