Flu

Tarrah Gibbons
June 30, 2020 - 1:48 pm
Is it possible to contract both coronavirus and the flu at once? Experts weigh in on whether or not people can have the two illnesses at the same time.
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FILE - This Jan. 23, 2020 file photo shows a patient receiving a flu vaccination in Mesquite, Texas. According to a study released on Wednesday, June 24, 2020, flu vaccines for years were close to 60% effective against the flu strain that caused the most lab-confirmed illnesses last winter, but it proved only 31% effective last season. (AP Photo/LM Otero, File)
June 24, 2020 - 5:03 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The flu vaccine did a disappointing job last winter in the U.S., and officials worry that might be a bad sign for the fall. Flu vaccines had been about 60% effective against the type of flu that caused the most lab-confirmed illnesses last winter, but last season's vaccine was only...
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FILE - In this Thursday, May 28, 2020 file photo, a fence outside Brooklyn's Green-Wood Cemetery is adorned with tributes to victims of COVID-19 in New York. The memorial is part of the Naming the Lost project which attempts to humanize the victims who are often just listed as statistics. The wall features banners that say "Naming the Lost" in six languages — English, Spanish, Mandarin, Arabic, Hebrew, and Bengali. Some worry a large new wave of coronavirus might occur in the fall or winter of 2020 — after schools reopen, the weather turns colder and less humid, and people huddle inside more. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
June 21, 2020 - 10:55 am
What's all this talk about a “second wave” of U.S. coronavirus cases? In The Wall Street Journal last week, Vice President Mike Pence wrote in a piece headlined “There Isn’t a Coronavirus ‘Second Wave'" that the nation is winning the fight against the virus. Many public health experts, however,...
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FILE - In this Aug. 19, 2019, file photo, Denver Broncos outside linebacker Bradley Chubb looks on during an NFL preseason football game between the Denver Broncos and the San Francisco 49ers in Denver. Many players polled by The Associated Press over the last couple of weeks say they are scared to return to work without a cure or a vaccine for the coronavirus. By and large, however, those same players say they trust the protocols the NFL will have in place by the time practices resume and games return. (AP Photo/Jack Dempsey, File)
June 06, 2020 - 10:48 am
DENVER (AP) — Seasonal colds and the flu spread through NFL locker rooms just about every year, sending some players home sick while others slog through practices hoping they’ll feel better by game day. Last December, the Patriots flew two airplanes to Houston to keep the healthy players apart from...
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President Donald Trump speaks about the coronavirus in the Rose Garden of the White House, Friday, May 15, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
May 16, 2020 - 12:14 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — For the first three years of his presidency, Donald Trump did not publicly utter the words “pandemic” or “preparedness.” Not in speeches, rallies or his many news conferences, planned and impromptu. But on Friday, the White House pointed to extensive planning exercises the...
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May 11, 2020 - 12:28 am
GALLUP, N.M. (AP) — A 105-year-old New Mexico woman who beat back the 1918 flu that killed millions, including her mother and infant sister, is battling COVID-19. The Gallup Independent reports Lubica “Luby” Grenko, who will turn 106 years old in August, has been fighting the coronavirus since...
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FILE - In this 1918 file photo made available by the Library of Congress, volunteer nurses from the American Red Cross tend to influenza patients in the Oakland Municipal Auditorium, used as a temporary hospital. Science has ticked off some major accomplishments over the last century. The world learned about viruses, cured various diseases, made effective vaccines, developed instant communications and created elaborate public-health networks. Yet in many ways, 2020 is looking like 1918, the year the great influenza pandemic raged. (Edward A. "Doc" Rogers/Library of Congress via AP, File)
May 05, 2020 - 9:33 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Despite a century's progress in science, 2020 is looking a lot like 1918. In the years between two lethal pandemics, one the misnamed Spanish flu, the other COVID-19, the world learned about viruses, cured various diseases, made effective vaccines, developed instant communications...
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FILE - In this April 10, 2020, file photo, wearing protective masks ground crew at the Los Angeles International airport unload supplies of medical personal protective equipment from a China Southern Cargo plane. Before the coronavirus outbreak, many states had only a modest supply of medical equipment. An Associated Press review of more than 20 states found that many were still storing items that were left over from an influenza pandemic a decade ago and long since expired. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel, File)
April 23, 2020 - 5:36 pm
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo (AP) — Last autumn, when schools were in session, sports stadiums full and no one had even heard of the COVID-19 disease, the Missouri health department made an eerily foreshadowing request. It asked the state for $300,000 to buy supplies in case of a large-scale disease outbreak...
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A man walks a dog as oil tankers sit offshore Wednesday, April 22, 2020, in Huntington Beach, Calif. About three dozen tankers are parked between Long Beach and the San Francisco Bay Area with nowhere to go due to lack of demand and nowhere to store the oil. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)
April 22, 2020 - 10:54 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Two people with the coronavirus died in California as much as three weeks before the U.S. reported its first death from the disease in late February — a gap that a top health official said Wednesday may have led to delays in issuing stay-at-home orders in the nation's most...
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FDNY ambulances are seen entering and leaving the emergency room at Queens Hospital Center, Monday, April 20, 2020, in the Jamaica neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York. The new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms for most people, but for some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness or death. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
April 20, 2020 - 1:52 pm
The Latest on the coronavirus pandemic. The new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms for most people. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness or death. TOP OF THE HOUR: — Number of daily deaths in New York state continues...
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