Fish

In this Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2019, photo, sightseers plays on a sandbar in the Mekong River in Nakhon Phanom province, northeastern Thailand. Experts say the aquamarine color the Mekong River has recently acquired may beguile tourists but it also indicates a problem caused by upstream dams. The water usually is a yellowish-brown shade due to the sediment it normally carries downstream. But lately it has been running clear, taking on a blue-green hue that is a reflection of the sky. The water levels have also become unusually low, exposing sandbanks in the middle of the river. (AP Photo/Chessadaporn Buasai)
December 05, 2019 - 8:00 pm
BANGKOK (AP) — The Mekong River has recently acquired an aquamarine color that may beguile tourists but also indicates a problem caused by upstream dams, experts in Thailand say. The river usually has a yellowish-brown shade due to the sediment it normally carries downstream. But lately it has been...
Read More
In this Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2019, photo, sightseers plays on a sandbar in the Mekong River in Nakhon Phanom province, northeastern Thailand. Experts say the aquamarine color the Mekong River has recently acquired may beguile tourists but it also indicates a problem caused by upstream dams. The water usually is a yellowish-brown shade due to the sediment it normally carries downstream. But lately it has been running clear, taking on a blue-green hue that is a reflection of the sky. The water levels have also become unusually low, exposing sandbanks in the middle of the river. (AP Photo/Chessadaporn Buasai)
December 05, 2019 - 7:04 am
BANGKOK (AP) — The Mekong River has recently acquired an aquamarine color that may beguile tourists but also indicates a problem caused by upstream dams, experts in Thailand say. The river usually has a yellowish-brown shade due to the sediment it normally carries downstream. But lately it has been...
Read More
In this undated photo provided by the Tennessee Aquarium, an electric ell named Miguel Wattson lights up a Christmas tree at the Tennessee Aquarium in Chattanooga, Tenn. The aquarium says a system connected to Miguel's tank enables his shocks to power strands of lights on the nearby tree. (Thom Benson/Tennessee Aquarium via AP)
December 04, 2019 - 9:58 am
CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) — Visitors to the Tennessee Aquarium may be shocked to learn that an electric eel named Miguel Wattson is lighting up a Christmas tree. A special system connected to Miguel's tank enables his shocks to power strands of lights on a nearby tree, according to a news release...
Read More
December 04, 2019 - 9:52 am
CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) — Visitors to the Tennessee Aquarium may be shocked to learn that an electric eel named Miguel Wattson is lighting up a Christmas tree. A special system connected to Miguel's tank enables his shocks to power strands of lights on a nearby tree, according to a news release...
Read More
December 04, 2019 - 7:07 am
CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) — Visitors to the Tennessee Aquarium may be shocked to learn that an electric eel named Miguel Wattson is lighting up a Christmas tree. A special system connected to Miguel's tank enables his shocks to power strands of lights on a nearby tree, according to a news release...
Read More
An anti-government demonstrator, her face painted with the colors of the Colombian national flag, takes part in a protest, in Bogota, Colombia, Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2019. Thousands of people have protested in Colombia over the past week, voicing discontent with the government of President Ivan Duque. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)
November 27, 2019 - 3:08 pm
BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — Colombians unhappy with President Iván Duque’s response to nearly a week of boisterous protests over everything from job losses to shark hunting took to the streets again Wednesday in a continuing tide of unrest. The daily protests jolting the South American country proclaim...
Read More
Students carry a youth injured curing clashes with police at the National University in Bogota, Colombia, Tuesday, Nov. 26, 2019. Protesters are calling for another mass demonstration in Colombia Wednesday after talks with President Ivan Duque hit a snag. (AP Photo/Ivan Valencia)
November 27, 2019 - 12:19 pm
BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — Colombians unhappy with President Iván Duque’s response to nearly a week of boisterous protests over everything from job losses to shark hunting took to the streets again Wednesday in a continuing tide of unrest. The daily protests jolting the South American country proclaim...
Read More
In this Nov. 14, 2019, photo provided by John Guillote and taken from an aerial drone shows the U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq as it makes its way through sea ice in the Beaufort Sea off Alaska's north coast. University of Washington scientists onboard the research vessel are studying the changes and how less sea ice will affect coastlines, which already are vulnerable to erosion because increased waves delivered by storms. More erosion would increase the chance of winter flooding in villages and danger to hunters in small boats. (John Guillote via AP)
November 19, 2019 - 5:58 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq can break through ice as thick as 2.5 feet (0.76 meters). In the Chukchi Sea northwest of Alaska this month, which should be brimming with floes, its limits likely won’t be tested. University of Washington researchers left Nome on Nov. 7 on...
Read More
November 19, 2019 - 2:10 pm
OUTER BANKS, N.C. (AP) — It’s not officially Shark Week but for trackers along the East Coast, several great white sharks are putting on a show. The Charlotte Observer reports nine sharks tagged by the ocean data-gathering organization OCEARCH have appeared near the coast in a five-day span,...
Read More
In this Nov. 14, 2019, photo provided by John Guillote and taken from an aerial drone shows the U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq as it makes its way through sea ice in the Beaufort Sea off Alaska's north coast. University of Washington scientists onboard the research vessel are studying the changes and how less sea ice will affect coastlines, which already are vulnerable to erosion because increased waves delivered by storms. More erosion would increase the chance of winter flooding in villages and danger to hunters in small boats. (John Guillote via AP)
November 19, 2019 - 1:03 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq can break through ice as thick as 2.5 feet (0.76 meters). In the Chukchi Sea northwest of Alaska this month, which should be brimming with floes, its limits likely won’t be tested. University of Washington researchers left Nome on Nov. 7 on...
Read More

Pages