Fish

Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers, left, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer and Ontario's Minister of the Environment, Conservation and Parks, Rod Phillips, leave a press conference after sharing highlights of their 2019 Leadership Summit at the Discovery World, Friday, June 14, 2019 in Milwaukee, Wis. (Angela Peterson/Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel via AP)
June 14, 2019 - 7:06 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — Great Lakes regional leaders will meet next month to consider a federal strategy for preventing Asian carp from reaching Lake Michigan and discuss helping foot the bill for the pricey project, officials said Friday. Representatives of the eight states and two Canadian...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, July 8, 2015 file photo, herring are unloaded from a fishing boat in Rockland, Maine. A study published Tuesday, June 11, 2019 finds a warmer world may lose a billion tons of fish and other marine life by the end of the century. The international study used computer models to project that for every degree Celsius the world warms, the total weight of life in the oceans drop by 5%. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
June 11, 2019 - 1:58 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The world's oceans will likely lose about one-sixth of their fish and other marine life by the end of the century if climate change continues on its current path, a new study says. Every degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) that the world's oceans warm, the total mass of sea...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, July 8, 2015 file photo, herring are unloaded from a fishing boat in Rockland, Maine. A study published Tuesday, June 11, 2019 finds a warmer world may lose a billion tons of fish and other marine life by the end of the century. The international study used computer models to project that for every degree Celsius the world warms, the total weight of life in the oceans drop by 5%. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
June 11, 2019 - 1:38 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The world's oceans will likely lose about one sixth of its fish and other marine life by the end of the century if climate change continues on its current path, a new study says. Every degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) that the world's oceans warm, the total mass of sea...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, July 8, 2015 file photo, herring are unloaded from a fishing boat in Rockland, Maine. A study published Tuesday, June 11, 2019 finds a warmer world may lose a billion tons of fish and other marine life by the end of the century. The international study used computer models to project that for every degree Celsius the world warms, the total weight of life in the oceans drop by 5%. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
June 11, 2019 - 12:48 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The world's oceans will likely lose about one sixth of its fish and other marine life by the end of the century if climate change continues on its current path, a new study says. Every degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) that the world's oceans warm, the total mass of sea...
Read More
FILE - In this Wednesday, July 8, 2015 file photo, herring are unloaded from a fishing boat in Rockland, Maine. A study published Tuesday, June 11, 2019 finds a warmer world may lose a billion tons of fish and other marine life by the end of the century. The international study used computer models to project that for every degree Celsius the world warms, the total weight of life in the oceans drop by 5%. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
June 11, 2019 - 12:45 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study says the world's oceans will likely lose about one-sixth of its fish and other marine life by the end of the century if climate change continues on its current path. A comprehensive computer-based study by an international team of marine biologists found that for every...
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This April 2019 photo provided by Audrey Velasco-Hogan shows a dragonfish during a specimen collection session along the coast of San Diego, Calif. The deep-sea creature's teeth are transparent underwater - virtually invisible to prey. According to research released on Wednesday, June 5, 2019, they are made of the same materials as human teeth, but the microscopic structure is different. And as a result, light doesn’t reflect off the surface. (Audrey Velasco-Hogan via AP)
June 05, 2019 - 1:30 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A deep-sea fish can hide its enormous, jutting teeth from prey because its chompers are virtually invisible — until it's too late. What's the dragonfish's secret? The teeth are transparent, and now scientists have discovered how the fish accomplished that trick. Findings were...
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In this May 21, 2019, photo, staff monitor fishing vessels in real time at a state-of-the-art surveillance center in Bangkok, one of seven in the Asia-Pacific region. The centers help to enforce the Port State Measures Agreement, which aims to help curb illegal, unreported and unregulated, or IUU, fishing. UN officials are urging more governments to join the agreement to help combat IUU fishing, which costs world fisheries more than $20 billion a year. (AP Photo/Elaine Kurtenbach)
June 05, 2019 - 2:01 am
BANGKOK (AP) — Major United Nations agencies are urging key fishing nations to join efforts to fight illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing. The U.N. Food and Agricultural Organization and other groups made the call at a conference in Bangkok on Wednesday focused on helping protect fisheries...
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Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Andrew Wheeler speaks at the National Press Club in Washington, Monday, June 3, 2019. The Food and Drug Administration's first broad testing of food for a worrisome class of nonstick, stain-resistant industrial compounds found high levels in some grocery store meats and seafood and in off-the-shelf chocolate cake. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
June 03, 2019 - 4:12 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration found substantial levels of a worrisome class of nonstick, stain-resistant industrial compounds in some grocery store meats and seafood and in off-the-shelf chocolate cake, according to FDA researchers. The FDA's food-test results are likely to...
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FILE - This Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018, file photo shows the U.S. Food and Drug Administration building behind FDA logos at a bus stop on the agency's campus in Silver Spring, Md. The Food and Drug Administration’s first broad testing of food for a worrisome class of nonstick, stain-resistant industrial compounds found high levels in some grocery store meats and seafood and in off-the-shelf chocolate cake, according to unreleased findings FDA researchers presented at a scientific conference in Europe. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
June 03, 2019 - 11:55 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration's first broad testing of food for a worrisome class of nonstick, stain-resistant industrial compounds found substantial levels in some grocery store meats and seafood and in off-the-shelf chocolate cake, according to unreleased findings FDA...
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FILE - This Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018, file photo shows the U.S. Food and Drug Administration building behind FDA logos at a bus stop on the agency's campus in Silver Spring, Md. The Food and Drug Administration’s first broad testing of food for a worrisome class of nonstick, stain-resistant industrial compounds found high levels in some grocery store meats and seafood and in off-the-shelf chocolate cake, according to unreleased findings FDA researchers presented at a scientific conference in Europe. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
June 03, 2019 - 9:49 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration's first broad testing of food for a worrisome class of nonstick, stain-resistant industrial compounds found substantial levels in some grocery store meats and seafood and in off-the-shelf chocolate cake, according to unreleased findings FDA...
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