Fish

JoDe Goudy, chairman of the Yakama Nation, speaks with the Columbia River in the background near The Dalles, Oregon, on Monday, Oct. 14, 2019, where Celilo Falls, an ancient salmon fishing site was destroyed by the construction of the Dalles Dam in the 1950s. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
October 14, 2019 - 9:22 pm
THE DALLES, Ore. (AP) — Two Pacific Northwest tribes on Monday demanded the removal of three major hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River to save migrating salmon and starving orcas and restore fishing sites that were guaranteed to the tribes in a treaty more than 150 years ago. The Yakama and...
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JoDe Goudy, chairman of the Yakama Nation, speaks with the Columbia River in the background near The Dalles, Oregon, on Monday, Oct. 14, 2019, where Celilo Falls, an ancient salmon fishing site was destroyed by the construction of the Dalles Dam in the 1950s. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
October 14, 2019 - 6:38 pm
THE DALLES, Ore. (AP) — Two Pacific Northwest tribes on Monday demanded the removal of three major hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River to save migrating salmon and starving orcas and restore fishing sites that were guaranteed to the tribes in a treaty more than 150 years ago. The Yakama and...
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This September 2019 photo provided by the New York Department of Environmental Conservation shows a brook trout caught by biologists from a tributary to Lake Colden near Keene, N.Y. In 2019, biologists confirmed a healthy population of brook trout were reproducing in the high altitude lake for the first time since acid rain rendered it unable to support fish 32 years earlier.(NY Department of Environmental Conservation via AP)
October 08, 2019 - 1:12 pm
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — A reproducing population of brook trout has been discovered in a tiny lake in the Adirondack High Peaks Wilderness for the first time since the lake was declared fishless because of acid rain 32 years ago, New York state officials said. Department of Environmental Conservation...
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This September 2019 photo provided by the New York Department of Environmental Conservation shows a brook trout caught by biologists at Lake Colden near Keene, N.Y. In 2019, biologists confirmed a healthy population of brook trout were reproducing in the high altitude lake for the first time since acid rain rendered it unable to support fish 32 years earlier. (NY Department of Environmental Conservation via AP)
October 08, 2019 - 12:38 pm
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — A reproducing population of brook trout has been discovered in a tiny lake in the Adirondack High Peaks Wilderness for the first time since the lake was declared fishless because of acid rain 32 years ago, New York state officials said. Department of Environmental Conservation...
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October 08, 2019 - 3:05 am
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Brook trout have been discovered in a high-elevation Adirondack Mountain lake for the first time since the lake was declared fishless due to acid rain 32 years ago. The Department of Environmental Conservation says the breeding population of trout in Lake Colden in the High...
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This August 2019 photo released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA) shows a mature northern fur seal standing on a beach on Bogoslof Island, Alaska. Alaska's northern fur seals are thriving on an island that's the tip of an active undersea volcano. Numbers of fur seals continue to grow on tiny Bogoslof Island despite hot mud, steam and sulfurous gases spitting from vents on the volcano. (Maggie Mooney-Seus/NOAA Fisheries via AP)
October 03, 2019 - 8:31 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska’s northern fur seal population for three decades has been classified as depleted, but the marine mammals are showing up in growing numbers at an unlikely location: a tiny island that forms the tip of an active undersea volcano. Vents on Bogoslof Island continue to...
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This August 2019 photo released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA) shows northern fur seal pups standing on a beach on Bogoslof Island, Alaska. Alaska's northern fur seals are thriving on an island that's the tip of an active undersea volcano. Numbers of fur seals continue to grow on tiny Bogoslof Island despite hot mud, steam and sulfurous gases spitting from vents on the volcano. (Maggie Mooney-Seus/NOAA Fisheries via AP)
October 03, 2019 - 7:08 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska’s northern fur seal population for three decades has been classified as depleted, but the marine mammals are showing up in growing numbers at an unlikely location: a tiny island that forms the tip of an active undersea volcano. Vents on Bogoslof Island continue to...
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This August 2019 photo released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA) shows northern fur seal pups standing on a beach on Bogoslof Island, Alaska. Alaska's northern fur seals are thriving on an island that's the tip of an active undersea volcano. Numbers of fur seals continue to grow on tiny Bogoslof Island despite hot mud, steam and sulfurous gases spitting from vents on the volcano. (Maggie Mooney-Seus/NOAA Fisheries via AP)
October 03, 2019 - 1:17 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska’s northern fur seal population for three decades has been classified as depleted, but the marine mammals are showing up in growing numbers at an unlikely location _ a tiny island that forms the tip of an active undersea volcano. Vents on Bogoslof Island continue to...
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Dead fish lie on the shores of Koroneia Lake in northern Greece, on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019. Tens of thousands of dead fish are washing up as the water level has plummeted to less than a meter deep (three feet) and the lack of oxygen in the water is leading to mass mortality of everything in it. (AP Photo/Giannis Papanikos)
September 19, 2019 - 12:54 pm
KORONEIA, Greece (AP) — Tens of thousands of dead fish have been found on the banks of a lake in a protected nature reserve in northern Greece after high temperatures and drought conditions caused a severe drop in water levels. State environmental officials said Thursday that the water level at...
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This undated photo provided by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife shows a Paiute cutthroat trout. For the first time in nearly a century, the California trout species will swim in a mountain creek that is its native habitat, marking a major milestone that conservationists hope will lead to a thriving population and removal of its threatened status. About 30 Paiute cutthroat trout will be plucked Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2019 from Coyote Valley Creek and hauled in cans strapped to pack mules about two miles (3.2 kilometers) to be dumped back into a stretch Silver King Creek in Alpine County's Long Valley, where the shimmering species glided through the cold water for thousands of years. (California Department of Fish and Wildlife via AP)
September 18, 2019 - 11:02 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — For the first time in nearly a century, a rare California trout species is swimming in a mountain creek that is its native habitat, marking a major milestone that conservationists hope will lead to a thriving population and removal of its threatened status. About 30 Paiute...
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