Environmental science

Environmental Protection Agency director Andrew Wheeler speaks about the release of the final report of the national Superfund Task Force, Monday, Sept. 9, 2019, at Southside Community Park in Chattanooga, Tenn (Erin O. Smith/Chattanooga Times Free Press via AP)
September 10, 2019 - 6:05 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Environmental Protection Agency is aiming to reduce and eventually eliminate the use of mammals to test the toxicity of chemicals, a move backed by animal rights groups but criticized as irresponsible by a leading environmental organization. A directive signed Tuesday by EPA...
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Environmental Protection Agency director Andrew Wheeler speaks about the release of the final report of the national Superfund Task Force, Monday, Sept. 9, 2019, at Southside Community Park in Chattanooga, Tenn (Erin O. Smith/Chattanooga Times Free Press via AP)
September 10, 2019 - 3:44 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Environmental Protection Agency is aiming to reduce and eventually eliminate the use of mammals to test the toxicity of chemicals, a move backed by animal rights groups but criticized as irresponsible by a leading environmental organization. A directive signed Tuesday by EPA...
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Valentino Ingraham washes clothing to remove salt and dirt amid the rubble of his mother's property destroyed by Hurricane Dorian in Rocky Creek East End, Grand Bahama, Bahamas, Sunday, Sept. 8, 2019. The motors of his family's boats were also destroyed. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
September 10, 2019 - 5:43 am
BERLIN (AP) — A group of leaders from business, politics and science have called for a massive investment in adapting to climate change over the next decade, arguing it would reap significant returns as countries avoid catastrophic losses and boost their economies. The Global Commission on...
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Tony Pagan, left, helps a friend set sandbags in place over a plastic tarp on the back door as they prepare to evacuate before Hurricane Dorian arrives with its storm surge and tropical storm winds, Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019, in Tybee Island, Ga. “This is climate change, though President Trump denies that it is,” Pagan, a 69-year-old retired electrician said as he and his wife finished packing to evacuate Wednesday. “He needs to open his eyes.” (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)
September 05, 2019 - 5:52 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly three-quarters of Americans see weather disasters, like Hurricane Dorian, worsening and most of them blame global warming to some extent, a new poll finds. And scientists say they're right. The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research survey shows 72% of...
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Tony Pagan, left, helps a friend set sandbags in place over a plastic tarp on the back door as they prepare to evacuate before Hurricane Dorian arrives with its storm surge and tropical storm winds, Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019, in Tybee Island, Ga. “This is climate change, though President Trump denies that it is,” Pagan, a 69-year-old retired electrician said as he and his wife finished packing to evacuate Wednesday. “He needs to open his eyes.” (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)
September 05, 2019 - 3:31 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly three-quarters of Americans see weather disasters, like Hurricane Dorian, worsening and most of them blame global warming to some extent, a new poll finds. And scientists say they're right. The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research survey shows 72% of...
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Tony Pagan, left, helps a friend set sandbags in place over a plastic tarp on the back door as they prepare to evacuate before Hurricane Dorian arrives with its storm surge and tropical storm winds, Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019, in Tybee Island, Ga. “This is climate change, though President Trump denies that it is,” Pagan, a 69-year-old retired electrician said as he and his wife finished packing to evacuate Wednesday. “He needs to open his eyes.” (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)
September 05, 2019 - 3:03 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly three-quarters of Americans see weather disasters, like Hurricane Dorian, worsening and most of them blame global warming to some extent, a new poll finds. And scientists say they're right. The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research survey shows 72% of...
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U.S. Sen. Mike Rounds, R-SD, chairman of the Senate subcommittee on Superfund, Waste Management and Regulatory Oversight, listens as Bill Beacom of Sioux City, Iowa, a retired Missouri River ship captain, makes a point after Rounds held a hearing on the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' management of 2019 Missouri River Basin flooding Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2019, in North Sioux City, South Dakota. (Tim Hynds/Sioux City Journal via AP)
August 28, 2019 - 9:27 pm
NORTH SIOUX CITY, S.D. (AP) — An official with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said Wednesday a study is needed to consider changes to flood-control measures along the Missouri River south of Sioux City, Iowa. Speaking after a U.S. Senate field hearing in North Sioux City, South Dakota, Brig. Gen...
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FILE - In this file photo dated Thursday, July 25, 2019, a bird sits on a straw bale on a field in Frankfurt, Germany, as the sun rises during an ongoing heatwave in Europe. The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday Aug. 15, 2019, that July was the hottest month measured on Earth since records began in 1880. (AP Photo/Michael Probst, FILE)
August 15, 2019 - 12:39 pm
BERLIN (AP) — July was the hottest month measured on Earth since records began in 1880, the latest in a long line of peaks that scientists say backs up predictions for man-made climate change. The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday that July was 0.95 degrees Celsius...
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Kai Frazier and Chance Seawright, brothers visiting from Aiken, South Carolina, cool off while playing in the Fountain of Rings in Centennial Olympic Park, Monday, Aug. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Andrea Smith)
August 12, 2019 - 7:45 pm
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — Forecasters are warning about days of scorching, dangerous heat gripping a wide swath of the U.S. South and Midwest, where the heat index on Monday eclipsed 120 degrees (48.9 Celsius) in one town and climbed nearly that high in others. With temperatures around 100 degrees (...
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Kai Frazier and Chance Seawright, brothers visiting from Aiken, South Carolina, cool off while playing in the Fountain of Rings in Centennial Olympic Park, Monday, Aug. 12, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Andrea Smith)
August 12, 2019 - 7:23 pm
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — Forecasters are warning about days of scorching, dangerous heat gripping a wide swath of the U.S. South and Midwest, where the heat index on Monday was approaching 120 degrees (48.9 Celsius) in one town and climbed nearly that high in others. With temperatures around 100...
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