Environmental science

FILE - In this June 13, 2012, file photo, Asian carp, jolted by an electric current from a research boat, jump from the Illinois River near Havana, Ill. Sport fish have declined significantly in portions of the Upper Mississippi River infested with Asian carp, apparently confirming fears about the invaders' threat to native species, according to a newly released study. Analysis of more than 20 years of population data suggests the carp are out-competing fish prized by anglers, such as yellow perch, bluegill, and black and white crappie, the report said. (AP Photo/John Flesher, File)
November 16, 2019 - 11:18 am
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — Sport fish have declined significantly in portions of the Upper Mississippi River infested with Asian carp, adding evidence to fears about the invader’s threat to native species, according to a new study. Analysis of nearly 20 years of population data suggests the carp...
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FILE - In this June 13, 2012, file photo, Asian carp, jolted by an electric current from a research boat, jump from the Illinois River near Havana, Ill. Sport fish have declined significantly in portions of the Upper Mississippi River infested with Asian carp, apparently confirming fears about the invaders' threat to native species, according to a newly released study. Analysis of more than 20 years of population data suggests the carp are out-competing fish prized by anglers, such as yellow perch, bluegill, and black and white crappie, the report said. (AP Photo/John Flesher, File)
November 16, 2019 - 11:16 am
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — A new study says sport fish have declined significantly in portions of the Upper Mississippi River infested with Asian carp. The study’s lead author says it’s among the first to establish a solid link between the presence of invasive carp and a drop-off of native species...
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FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2013, file photo, workers build a water barrier with sandbags as floodwater threaten their factory at Amata Nakorn industrial estate in Chonburi province, eastern Thailand. The number of people threatened by climate change-triggered flooding is about three times higher than previously thought, a new study says. But it's not because of more water. It's because the land, especially in Asia and the developing world, is several feet lower than what space-based radar has calculated, according to a study in the journal Nature Communications Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong, File)
October 29, 2019 - 12:06 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of people threatened by climate change-triggered flooding is about three times higher than previously thought, a new study says. But it's not because of more water. It's because the land, especially in Asia and the developing world, is several feet lower than what space...
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FILE - In this Jan. 5, 2016, file photo, Chris Lene sweeps water out of one of the businesses in the building he owns that was flooded by rainwater in Sacramento, Calif. Climate change is making stronger El Ninos, which change weather worldwide and heat up an already warming planet, according a study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Monday, Oct. 21, 2019. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
October 21, 2019 - 3:53 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Climate change is making stronger El Ninos, which change weather worldwide and heat up an already warming planet, a new study finds. Scientists examined 33 El Ninos — natural warming of equatorial Pacific that triggers weather extremes across the globe — since 1901. They found...
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FILE - In this Jan. 5, 2016, file photo, Chris Lene sweeps water out of one of the businesses in the building he owns that was flooded by rainwater in Sacramento, Calif. Climate change is making stronger El Ninos, which change weather worldwide and heat up an already warming planet, according a study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Monday, Oct. 21, 2019. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
October 21, 2019 - 3:19 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study finds climate change is making stronger El Ninos, which change weather worldwide and heat up an already warming planet. Scientists looked at 33 El Ninos since 1901. This natural weather phenomenon is the warming of equatorial Pacific that triggers weather extremes...
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Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg pulls her speech out of a pocket as she steps up to speak to several thousand people at a climate strike rally Friday, Oct. 11, 2019, in Denver. The rally was staged in Denver's Civic Center Park. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
October 11, 2019 - 9:07 pm
DENVER (AP) — Young people must be prepared to continue striking to call for action on climate change for a long time and not back down, Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg told a climate strike rally in Denver on Friday. Thunberg said she and fellow youth activists won't beg those in power to...
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Super scoopers make drops on the Saddleridge fire in Placerita Canyon near Newhall, Calif., Friday, Oct. 11, 2019. (David Crane/The Orange County Register via AP)
October 11, 2019 - 7:32 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Expect more preventative power blackouts in California as the climate gets hotter and drier and the wildfire season gets nastier and longer, scientists say. The Golden State already is fire-prone with lots of dry plants and woodlands — but add high winds that can knock down power...
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Super scoopers make drops on the Saddleridge fire in Placerita Canyon near Newhall, Calif., Friday, Oct. 11, 2019. (David Crane/The Orange County Register via AP)
October 11, 2019 - 5:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Expect more preventative power blackouts in California as the climate gets hotter and drier and the wildfire season gets nastier and longer, scientists say. The Golden State already is fire-prone with lots of dry plants and woodlands — but add high winds that can knock down power...
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Super scoopers make drops on the Saddleridge fire in Placerita Canyon near Newhall, Calif., Friday, Oct. 11, 2019. (David Crane/The Orange County Register via AP)
October 11, 2019 - 3:52 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Expect more preventative power blackouts in California as the climate gets hotter and drier and the wildfire season gets nastier and longer, scientists say. The Golden State already is fire-prone with lots of dry plants and woodlands — but add high winds that can knock down...
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Super scoopers make drops on the Saddleridge fire in Placerita Canyon near Newhall, Calif., Friday, Oct. 11, 2019. (David Crane/The Orange County Register via AP)
October 11, 2019 - 2:50 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists say with worsening fires and a longer burn season from climate change, California should expect more intentional power blackouts to prevent high winds from knocking down power lines. The area of California burned by fire has increased fivefold since 1972 as temperatures...
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