Environmental concerns

Salt Lake City Council Chairwoman Erin Mendenhall, Fraser Bullock, chief operating officer of the 2002 Winter Games, Jeff Robbins, president and CEO of the Utah Sports Commission, Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski, Gov. Gary Herbert, USA Olympic speed skater Catherine Rainey-Norman and Salt Lake County Councilman Jim Bradley raise their arms in celebration after the USOC choose Salt Lake over Denver to bid on behalf of the U.S. for future Winter Games, Friday, Dec. 14, 2018 in Salt Lake City. Salt Lake City got the green light to bid for the Winter Olympics — most likely for 2030 — in an attempt to bring the Games back to the city that hosted in 2002 and provided the backdrop for the U.S. winter team's ascendance into an international powerhouse. (Steve Griffin/The Deseret News via AP)
December 18, 2018 - 3:59 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — When Salt Lake City pursued the Winter Olympics more than two decades ago, competition was so fierce that lavishing International Olympic Committee members with gifts and favors seemed commonplace. Salt Lake City got caught in a bribery scandal that nearly derailed the plans...
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FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2014, file photo, an endangered female orca leaps from the water while breaching in Puget Sound west of Seattle as seen from a federal research vessel that has been tracking the whales. Two conservation groups say the federal government is violating the Endangered Species Act by failing to consider how salmon fishing off the West Coast is affecting endangered killer whales. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
December 18, 2018 - 3:38 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — The federal government is violating the Endangered Species Act by failing to consider how salmon fishing off the West Coast is affecting endangered killer whales, two conservation groups said Tuesday as they threatened a lawsuit. The Arizona-based Center for Biological Diversity and...
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Salt Lake City Council Chairwoman Erin Mendenhall, Fraser Bullock, chief operating officer of the 2002 Winter Games, Jeff Robbins, president and CEO of the Utah Sports Commission, Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski, Gov. Gary Herbert, USA Olympic speed skater Catherine Rainey-Norman and Salt Lake County Councilman Jim Bradley raise their arms in celebration after the USOC choose Salt Lake over Denver to bid on behalf of the U.S. for future Winter Games, Friday, Dec. 14, 2018 in Salt Lake City. Salt Lake City got the green light to bid for the Winter Olympics — most likely for 2030 — in an attempt to bring the Games back to the city that hosted in 2002 and provided the backdrop for the U.S. winter team's ascendance into an international powerhouse. (Steve Griffin/The Deseret News via AP)
December 18, 2018 - 3:27 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — When Salt Lake City pursued the Winter Olympics more than two decades ago, competition was so fierce that lavishing International Olympic Committee members with gifts and favors seemed commonplace. Salt Lake City got caught in a bribery scandal that nearly derailed the plans...
Read More
Salt Lake City Council Chairwoman Erin Mendenhall, Fraser Bullock, chief operating officer of the 2002 Winter Games, Jeff Robbins, president and CEO of the Utah Sports Commission, Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski, Gov. Gary Herbert, USA Olympic speed skater Catherine Rainey-Norman and Salt Lake County Councilman Jim Bradley raise their arms in celebration after the USOC choose Salt Lake over Denver to bid on behalf of the U.S. for future Winter Games, Friday, Dec. 14, 2018 in Salt Lake City. Salt Lake City got the green light to bid for the Winter Olympics — most likely for 2030 — in an attempt to bring the Games back to the city that hosted in 2002 and provided the backdrop for the U.S. winter team's ascendance into an international powerhouse. (Steve Griffin/The Deseret News via AP)
December 18, 2018 - 12:27 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — When Salt Lake City pursued the Winter Olympics more than two decades ago, competition was so fierce that hardly anyone thought twice about lavishing International Olympic Committee members with gifts and favors. Salt Lake City got caught in a bribery scandal that nearly...
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Salt Lake City Council Chairwoman Erin Mendenhall, Fraser Bullock, chief operating officer of the 2002 Winter Games, Jeff Robbins, president and CEO of the Utah Sports Commission, Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski, Gov. Gary Herbert, USA Olympic speed skater Catherine Rainey-Norman and Salt Lake County Councilman Jim Bradley raise their arms in celebration after the USOC choose Salt Lake over Denver to bid on behalf of the U.S. for future Winter Games, Friday, Dec. 14, 2018 in Salt Lake City. Salt Lake City got the green light to bid for the Winter Olympics — most likely for 2030 — in an attempt to bring the Games back to the city that hosted in 2002 and provided the backdrop for the U.S. winter team's ascendance into an international powerhouse. (Steve Griffin/The Deseret News via AP)
December 18, 2018 - 11:57 am
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — When Salt Lake City pursued the Winter Olympics more than two decades ago, competition was so fierce that hardly anyone thought twice about lavishing International Olympic Committee members with gifts and favors. Salt Lake City got caught in a bribery scandal that nearly...
Read More
FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2018 file photo Martin Winterkorn, former CEO of the German car manufacturer 'Volkswagen', arrives for the annual general meeting of FC Bayern Munich soccer club in Munich, Germany. The club said Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2018 that Winterkorn stood down as FC Bayern Muenchen AG supervisory board member at Monday's board meeting. He had informed supervisory board chairman Uli Hoeneß of the decision earlier. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader, file)
December 18, 2018 - 7:07 am
MUNICH (AP) — German soccer champion Bayern Munich says former Volkswagen CEO Martin Winterkorn has left its supervisory board, three years after he resigned from the automaker amid its diesel emissions scandal. The club said the 71-year-old Winterkorn stood down on Monday after nearly 16 years as...
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FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2018 file photo Martin Winterkorn, former CEO of the German car manufacturer 'Volkswagen', arrives for the annual general meeting of FC Bayern Munich soccer club in Munich, Germany. The club said Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2018 that Winterkorn stood down as FC Bayern Muenchen AG supervisory board member at Monday's board meeting. He had informed supervisory board chairman Uli Hoeneß of the decision earlier. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader, file)
December 18, 2018 - 7:03 am
MUNICH (AP) — German soccer champion Bayern Munich says former Volkswagen CEO Martin Winterkorn has left its supervisory board, three years are he resigned from the automaker amid its diesel emissions scandal. The club said the 71-year-old Winterkorn stood down on Monday after nearly 16 years as a...
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This undated photo provided by in Lawerence County Sheriff in Mt. Vernon, Mo., shows David Berry Jr. Berry was ordered to watch the Walt Disney movie at least once each month during his one-year jail sentence in what conservation agents are calling one of the largest deer poaching cases in state history. Lawrence County Prosecuting Attorney Don Trotter says the deer were killed for their heads and their bodies were left to rot. (Lawerence County Sheriff via AP)
December 18, 2018 - 3:30 am
OZARKS, Mo. (AP) — A Missouri poacher has been ordered to repeatedly watch the movie "Bambi" as part of his sentence in a scheme to illegally kill hundreds of deer. David Berry Jr. was ordered to watch the Disney classic at least once a month during his year-long jail sentence in what conservation...
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December 17, 2018 - 7:31 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Five conservation groups filed a lawsuit Monday seeking to block oil production from a proposed artificial gravel island in federal Arctic waters. The groups asked the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to review an offshore production plan approved for the Liberty project...
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FILE - In this April 21, 2017 file photo, Chelsea Clinton attends Variety's Power of Women: New York Presented by Lifetime in New York. Clinton is collaborating with illustrator Gianna Marino on “Don’t Let Them Disappear,” Penguin Young Readers announced Monday. Scheduled for April 2, the book will celebrate whales, tigers and other animals and provide advice on how to help preserve them. (Photo by Andy Kropa/Invision/AP, File)
December 17, 2018 - 3:35 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Chelsea Clinton's career as a children's author continues with a picture book about endangered animals. Penguin Young Readers announced Monday that the daughter of Bill and Hillary Clinton is collaborating with illustrator Gianna Marino on "Don't Let Them Disappear." Scheduled for...
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