Environment

Children receive treatment at a hospital following a chemical gas leak in Vishakhapatnam, India, Friday, May 8, 2020. Indian authorities evacuated more people from villages near a South Korean-owned chemical factory where a gas leak killed 12 people and left about 1,000 struggling to breathe. Authorities said the evacuation was precautionary, but it triggered panic among people overnight that another gas leak was occurring. (AP Photo)
May 08, 2020 - 11:41 am
HYDERABAD, India (AP) — Indian police on Friday filed charges of culpable homicide, including negligence in handling toxic substances, against a South Korean-owned chemical factory where a gas leak killed 12 people and sickened more than a thousand. The chemical styrene, used to make plastic and...
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FILE - In this Oct. 30, 2019, file photo, an electric racing series Extreme E is displayed during the Future Investment Initiative forum in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Andretti Autosport and Chip Ganassi Racing are the first two American teams to commit to a new electric SUV off-road racing series scheduled to begin in 2021. The Extreme E series has five events planned in what the league is calling “some of the most remarkable, remote and severely damaged locations on the planet.” (AP Photo/Amr Nabil, File)
May 06, 2020 - 1:36 pm
Andretti Autosport and Chip Ganassi Racing are the first two American teams to commit to a new electric SUV off-road racing series scheduled to begin in 2021. The Extreme E series has five events planned in what the league is calling “some of the most remarkable, remote and severely damaged...
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FILE - In this April 17, 2020, file photo, an oil rig stands against the setting sun in Midland, Texas. Texas regulators are relaxing rules about where companies can store oil underground, raising concern among environmentalists about potential groundwater contamination and other dangers. (Odessa American/Eli Hartman, File)
May 05, 2020 - 6:44 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Texas regulators are relaxing rules about where companies can store oil underground, raising concern among environmentalists about potential groundwater contamination and other dangers. The members of the Railroad Commission of Texas voted Tuesday to allow companies to store oil...
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FILE - In this March 26, 2020, file photo, Jason Hackedorn looks into Progressive Field, home of the Cleveland Indians baseball team, in Cleveland. With the distinct possibility of pro sports resuming in empty venues, a recent poll suggests a majority of U.S. fans wouldn't feel safe attending games anyway without a coronavirus vaccine.(AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)
May 05, 2020 - 3:53 pm
The Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world: ___ The Miami Dolphins say their stadium has committed to becoming the first to receive accreditation from a cleaning industry association for infectious disease prevention efforts. The Global Biorisk Advisory Council...
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French President Emmanuel Macron, wearing a protective face mask, speaks with schoolchildren during a class at the Pierre Ronsard elementary school Tuesday, May 5 2020 in Poissy, outside Paris. Starting from May 11, all French businesses will be allowed to resume activity and schools will start gradually reopening. (Ian Langsdon, Pool via AP)
May 05, 2020 - 10:09 am
The Latest on the coronavirus pandemic. The new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms for most people. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness or death. TOP OF THE HOUR: — 4 new cases in South Korea, China show work on...
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In this Dec. 30, 2019, photo provided by the Washington State Department of Agriculture, a dead Asian giant hornet is photographed in a lab in Olympia, Wash. The world's largest hornet, a 2-inch long killer with an appetite for honey bees, has been found in Washington state and entomologists are making plans to wipe it out. Dubbed the "Murder Hornet" by some, the Asian giant hornet has a sting that could be fatal to some humans. It is just now starting to emerge from hibernation. (Quinlyn Baine/Washington State Department of Agriculture via AP)
May 04, 2020 - 10:21 pm
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — The world's largest hornet, a 2-inch killer dubbed the "Murder Hornet" with an appetite for honey bees, has been found in Washington state, where entomologists were making plans to wipe it out. The giant Asian insect, with a sting that could be fatal to some people, is just...
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May 04, 2020 - 7:17 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — An Amazon executive said he quit his job at the online-retail giant to protest the firing of employees who spoke up about the conditions inside the company's warehouses and its record on climate change. Tim Bray, a vice president at the company, wrote in a blog post that he left his...
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FILE - In this Sept. 18, 2015 file photo, Muslim pilgrims shelter themselves from the heat as they attend Friday afternoon prayers outside the Grand Mosque in the holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia. A new study released Monday, May 4, 2020, says 2 to 3.5 billion people in 50 years will be living in a climate that historically has proven just too hot to handle. Currently about 20 million people live in places with an annual average temperature greater than 84 degrees (29 degrees Celsius) — far beyond the temperature sweet spot. That area is less than 1% of the Earth’s land, and it is mostly near the Sahara Desert and includes Mecca, Saudi Arabia. (AP Photo/Mosa'ab Elshamy, File)
May 04, 2020 - 3:18 pm
KENSINGTON, Maryland (AP) — In just 50 years, 2 billion to 3.5 billion people, mostly the poor who can’t afford air conditioning, will be living in a climate that historically has been too hot to handle, a new study said. With every 1.8 degree (1 degree Celsius) increase in global average annual...
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May 04, 2020 - 1:09 pm
ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Environmental groups in Greece are urging the public to join a campaign against plans by the center-right government to overhaul offshore oil and gas exploration rules, which authorities argue will help the country end its dependence on coal. The proposed changes are due to be...
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Gen Nashimoto, of Luminalt, installs solar panels in Hayward, Calif., on Wednesday, April 29, 2020. From New York to California, the U.S renewable energy industry is reeling from the new coronavirus pandemic, which has delayed construction and sowed doubts about major projects on the drawing board. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
May 02, 2020 - 10:57 am
The U.S. renewable energy industry is reeling from the new coronavirus pandemic, which has delayed construction and sowed doubts about major projects on the drawing board. As many as 120,000 jobs in solar and 35,000 in wind could be lost, trade groups say. Leaders are confident the future is bright...
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