Environment

FILE - This 2013 file photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife shows nectar-feeding lesser long-nosed bats attracted to a hummingbird feeder during a citizen science bat migration monitoring project in southern Arizona. Wildlife managers in the American Southwest say a once-rare bat important to the pollination of plants used to produce tequila has made a comeback and is being removed from the federal endangered species list. (Richard Spitzer/U.S. Fish and Wildlife via AP, file)
April 17, 2018 - 2:32 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Wildlife managers in the American Southwest say a once-rare bat important to the pollination of plants used to produce tequila has made a comeback and is being removed from the U.S. endangered species list. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's announcement Tuesday made the...
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April 17, 2018 - 11:31 am
PORTAGE, Ind. (AP) — Chicago and some Great Lakes surfers say a federal settlement inadequately punishes U.S. Steel for chemical spills into Lake Michigan. The University of Chicago discovered last year that the steelmaker's Midwest Plant has violated chromium limits at least four times since 2013...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, March 7, 2018 file photo, police officers guard a cordon around a police tent covering the the spot where former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter were found critically ill Sunday following exposure to an "unknown substance" in Salisbury, England. British officials said Tuesday April 17, 2018, the nerve agent used to poison former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter was delivered in liquid form, and it will take months to remove all traces of the toxin. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)
April 17, 2018 - 8:40 am
LONDON (AP) — The nerve agent used on former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia was delivered in liquid form, British officials said Tuesday, as they revealed it will take months to clean up the toxic trail the poison left around the city of Salisbury. The U.K. Environment Department...
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FILE - In this Aug. 13, 2017 file photo a man takes part in a protest against large-scale government logging in the Bialowieza Forest, Poland The European Union's top court has ruled that Poland violated environmental laws with its massive logging of trees in one of Europe's last pristine forests. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski, file
April 17, 2018 - 6:19 am
WARSAW, Poland (AP) — The European Union's top court ruled on Tuesday that Poland violated environmental laws with its massive felling of trees in one of Europe's last pristine forests. The ruling by the European Court of Justice said that, in increasing logging in the Bialowieza Forest in 2016-17...
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FILE - In this Aug. 13, 2017 file photo a man takes part in a protest against large-scale government logging in the Bialowieza Forest, Poland The European Union's top court has ruled that Poland violated environmental laws with its massive logging of trees in one of Europe's last pristine forests. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski, file
April 17, 2018 - 4:40 am
WARSAW, Poland (AP) — The European Union's top court ruled on Tuesday that Poland violated environmental laws with its massive logging of trees in one of Europe's last pristine forests. The ruling by the European Court of Justice said that, in increasing logging in the Bialowieza Forest in 2016,...
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FILE- In this April 23, 2015, file photo a sparrow hawk looks up after catching a pigeon on a falcon farm, near the northern Serbian town of Coka. A study published Monday, April 16, 2018, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences gives the first global look at a worsening timing problem. For example in the Netherlands, the Eurasian sparrow hawk has been late for dinner because its prey, the blue tit, over 16 years has arrived almost six days earlier than the hawk. (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic, File)
April 16, 2018 - 3:17 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Global warming is screwing up nature's intricately timed dinner hour, often making hungry critters and those on the menu show up at much different times, a new study shows. Timing is everything in nature. Bees have to be around and flowers have to bloom at the same time for...
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FILE - In this April 3, 2018, file photo, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt speaks at a news conference in Washington. An internal government watchdog says the EPA violated federal spending laws when purchasing a $43,000 soundproof privacy booth for Pruitt to make private phone calls in his office. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
April 16, 2018 - 1:46 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — An internal government watchdog says the Environmental Protection Agency violated federal spending laws when purchasing a $43,000 soundproof privacy booth for Administrator Scott Pruitt to make private phone calls in his office. The Government Accountability Office issued its...
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April 16, 2018 - 12:04 pm
WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Seven young female bison from Poland are being shipped off to help boost a herd in Spain and expand the population of Europe's largest animal, which is on the endangered species list. Michal Krzysiak, head of the Bialowieza National Park in eastern Poland, said the bison —...
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FILE - This Dec. 17, 2017 file photo shows Carolina Panthers' Daryl Worley (26) celebrating his interception against the Green Bay Packers during the first half of an NFL football game in Charlotte, N.C. The Philadelphia Eagles have released Worley hours after he was arrested. NFL Network reported that Worley was arrested Sunday, April 15, 2018 near the team’s practice facility and that police used a Taser on him after he became combative. The Eagles traded wide receiver Torrey Smith to the Carolina Panthers for Worley in March. (AP Photo/Mike McCarn)
April 15, 2018 - 6:34 pm
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — The Philadelphia Eagles have released cornerback Daryl Worley, hours after he was arrested. NFL Network reported that Worley was arrested Sunday morning near the team's practice facility and that police used a Taser on him after he became combative. The report also said a gun...
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April 14, 2018 - 9:10 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A well-known gay rights lawyer and environmental advocate burned himself to death in New York City on Saturday in a grisly protest against ecological destruction. The charred remains of 60-year-old David Buckel were found by passers-by in Brooklyn's Prospect Park. Police said he was...
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