Environment

FILE - In this Oct. 8, 2019 file photo, the logo for Schlumberger appears above a trading post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Schlumberger is cutting more than 21,000 jobs and paying $1.02 billion in severance as declining oil prices amid the coronavirus pandemic push it to slash costs Schlumberger Ltd. said in a regulatory filing on Friday, July 24, 2020, that vast majority of the severance charge is expected to be paid out during the second half of the year. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
July 24, 2020 - 12:38 pm
Schlumberger is cutting more than 21,000 jobs as the global coronavirus pandemic quashes demand for energy and oil prices are routed. The company will pay more than $1 billion in severance benefits. The job cuts announced Friday, about a quarter of its entire workforce, puts the number of people...
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In this handout released by Governor of Yamalo-Nenets region Press Office, people dig in silt searching for mammoth bone fragments in the Pechevalavato Lake in the Yamalo-Nenets region, Russia, Wednesday, July 22, 2020. Fragments of a mammoth skeleton have been found by local reindeer herders in the lake a few days ago, and scientists hope to retrieve the entire skeleton - a rare find that could help deepen the knowledge about mammoths that have died out around 10,000 years ago. (Artem Cheremisov/Governor of Yamalo-Nenets region of Russia Press Office via AP)
July 24, 2020 - 12:17 pm
MOSCOW (AP) — Russian scientists are working to retrieve the well-preserved skeleton of a woolly mammoth, which has some ligaments still attached to it, from a lake in northern Siberia. Fragments of the skeleton were found by local reindeer herders in the shallows of Pechevalavato Lake on the...
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FILE - In this Friday, July 10, 2020 file grab taken from video provided by Russian Emergency Ministry, shows a Russian Emergency Ministry's Beriev plane BE-200 Be-200 multipurpose amphibious aircraft releasing water in the Trans-Baikal National Park in Buryatia, southern Siberia, Russia. The U.N. weather agency is warning that average temperatures in Siberia came in 10 degrees Celsius (18 Fahrenheit) above average last month, a spate of exceptional heat that has fanned devastating fires in the Arctic Circle. The high heat has also contributed to the rapid depletion of ice sea coverage off the Russian Arctic coast. World Meteorological Organization Secretary-General Petteri Taalas said the Arctic is heating more than twice as fast as the global average. WMO says the extended heat is linked to a large “blocking pressure system” and northward swing of the jet stream. (Russian Emergency Ministry Press Service via AP, File)
July 24, 2020 - 9:21 am
GENEVA (AP) — The U.N. weather agency warned Friday that average temperatures in Siberia were 10 degrees Celsius (18 Fahrenheit) above average last month, a spate of exceptional heat that has fanned devastating fires in the Arctic Circle and contributed to a rapid depletion in ice sea off Russia's...
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FILE - In this June 25, 2020, file photo, Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden, center, speaks to Stacie Ritter, right, and her son, Jan, during a meeting with families who have benefited from the Affordable Care Act in Lancaster, Pa.(AP Photo/Matt Slocum, File)
July 24, 2020 - 5:57 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Joe Biden wants to address health care disparities, toughen gun control, overhaul policing, provide free community college, erase student loan debt, invest in green energy and improve the nation's infrastructure. But that's just the start. The presumptive Democratic presidential...
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FILE - In this Feb. 10, 2020, file photo, a series of greenhouses are pictured at the University of Nevada, Reno, where a rare desert wildflower is growing. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says there's enough scientific evidence that two rare plants in Nevada's desert could go extinct to warrant a year-long review of whether to list them as U.S. endangered species, including one at the center of a fight over a proposed lithium mine. (AP Photo/Scott Sonner, File)
July 24, 2020 - 1:21 am
RENO, Nev. (AP) — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says there’s enough scientific evidence that two rare plants in Nevada’s desert could go extinct to warrant a year-long review of whether to list them as endangered species, including one at the center of a fight over a proposed lithium mine...
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FILE - In this July 20, 2020 file photo Federal agents use crowd control munitions to disperse Black Lives Matter protesters at the Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse in Portland, Ore. When armed protesters took over a remote wildlife refuge in eastern Oregon four years ago to oppose federal control of public lands, U.S. agents negotiated with the conservative occupiers for weeks while some state leaders begged for stronger action. This month, federal officers sent to Portland to quell chaotic protests against racial injustice took swift and, some say, harsh action: launching tear gas, firing less-lethal ammunition and helping arrest more than 40 people in the first two weeks. (AP Photo/Noah Berger,File)
July 23, 2020 - 2:51 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — When armed protesters took over a remote wildlife refuge in eastern Oregon four years ago to oppose federal control of public lands, U.S. agents negotiated with the conservative occupiers for weeks while some state leaders begged for stronger action. This month, federal officers...
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In this undated handout photo provided by the Wroclaw zoo, a little tiger is pictured at the zoo in Wroclaw, Poland. The 2-month-old Sumatran tiger cub is getting to know the world and learning to hunt from her mother at a zoo in southwestern Poland, the first such cub born there in 20 years. The as-yet-unnamed cub was born May 23 as her mother Nuri’s first offspring and the authorities at the Wroclaw Zoo are overjoyed that the mother is taking very good care of her. (Wroclaw Zoo via AP)
July 23, 2020 - 10:52 am
WARSAW, Poland (AP) — A 2-month-old Sumatran tiger cub is getting to know the world and learning to hunt from her mother at a zoo in southwestern Poland, the first such cub born there in 20 years. The as-yet-unnamed female cub was born May 23 as her mother Nuri’s first offspring and the authorities...
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FILE - This 1907 photo provided by the U.S. National Park Service shows naturalist John Muir in Yosemite National Park, Calif. The Sierra Club is reckoning with the racist views of founder John Muir, the naturalist who helped spawn environmentalism. The San Francisco-based environmental group said Wednesday, July 22, 2020, that Muir was part of the group's history perpetuating white supremacy. Executive Director Michael Brune says Muir made racist remarks about Black people and Native Americans, though his views later evolved. (Courtesy of U.S. National Park Service via AP)
July 22, 2020 - 8:31 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — The Sierra Club apologized Wednesday for racist remarks its founder, naturalist John Muir, made more then a century ago as the influential environmental group grapples with a harmful history that perpetuated white supremacy. Executive Director Michael Brune said it was “time to...
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FILE - In this June 29, 2020 file photo, Committee Chairman Rep. Raul Grijalva, D-Ariz., listens on Capitol Hill in Washington, during the House Natural Resources Committee hearing. A bipartisan bill that would spend nearly $3 billion on conservation projects, outdoor recreation and maintenance of national parks and other public lands is on its way to the president’s desk after winning final legislative approval. Supporters say the measure, known as the Great American Outdoors Act, would be the most significant conservation legislation enacted in nearly 50 years. (Bonnie Cash/Pool via AP)
July 22, 2020 - 7:33 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan bill that would spend nearly $3 billion on conservation projects, outdoor recreation and maintenance of national parks and other public lands is on its way to the president's desk after winning final legislative approval. Supporters say the measure, known as the Great...
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This photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows an Arctic grayling captured in a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service fish trap at Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge near Lima, Montana. U.S. wildlife officials have rejected federal protections for the rare, freshwater fish species at the center of a long-running legal dispute. The decision, on Wednesday, July 22, 2020, comes almost two years after a federal appeals court faulted the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for dismissing the threat that climate change and other pressures pose to Arctic grayling. (Jim Mogen/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP)
July 22, 2020 - 7:14 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. wildlife officials on Wednesday rejected special protections for a rare, freshwater fish related to salmon that's been at the center of a long-running legal dispute, citing conservation efforts that officials say have increased Arctic grayling numbers in a Montana river...
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