Environment and nature

In this photo taken Monday, Jan. 28, 2019, without tourists and park rangers to discourage them during the government shutdown, elephant seals have expanded their pupping grounds in Point Reyes National Seashore, Calif. About 60 adult seals have birthed 35 pups took over a beach knocking down a fence and moving into the parking lot. (John Burgess/The Press Democrat via AP)
February 01, 2019 - 9:51 am
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — National parks across the United States are scrambling to clean up and repair damage that visitors and storms caused during the recent government shutdown while bracing for the possibility of another closure ahead of the busy Presidents Day weekend later this month. Visitors...
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In this photo taken Monday, Jan. 28, 2019, without tourists and park rangers to discourage them during the government shutdown, elephant seals have expanded their pupping grounds in Point Reyes National Seashore, Calif. About 60 adult seals have birthed 35 pups took over a beach knocking down a fence and moving into the parking lot. (John Burgess/The Press Democrat via AP)
February 01, 2019 - 9:42 am
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — National parks across the U.S. are scrambling to clean up and repair damage that visitors and storms caused during the recent government shutdown. A full accounting of damage across more than 400 National Park Service locations isn't known. The agency says damage is isolated...
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Customs officers display some of the seized elephant tusks to the media, in Kampala, Uganda Friday, Feb. 1, 2019. Ugandan authorities have seized 750 pieces of ivory and thousands of pangolin scales being smuggled from neighboring South Sudan, in one of the largest seizures of wildlife contraband in the East African country, according to the Uganda Revenue Authority. (AP Photo/Ronald Kabuubi)
February 01, 2019 - 8:18 am
KAMPALA, Uganda (AP) — Officials say a staggeringly large bust of smuggled ivory and pangolin scales in Uganda is worth $3.5 million. Uganda Revenue Authority spokesman Vincent Seruma told reporters on Friday that the intercepted shipment contained more than three tons of elephant tusks and nearly...
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February 01, 2019 - 7:29 am
LONDON (AP) — Energy giant BP said Friday it will support a resolution from a group of institutional investors to describe how its strategy is consistent with the Paris climate change accords — a reflection of how investor pressure is putting global warming on the boardroom agenda. The company says...
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February 01, 2019 - 5:38 am
LONDON (AP) — The board of energy giant BP says it will support a resolution from a group of institutional investors to describe how its strategy is consistent with the Paris climate change accords — a reflection of how investor pressure is putting global warming on the boardroom agenda. The...
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In this Jan. 14, 2019, file photo, spectators cool themselves down with a water mist fan during play on day one at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia. Australia has sweltered through its hottest month on record in January and the summer of extremes continues with wildfires razing the drought-parched south while expanses of the tropical north are flooded. Australia’s Bureau of Meteorology confirmed the record heat during January as parts of the northern hemisphere have had record cold. (AP Photo/Andy Brownbill, File)
February 01, 2019 - 2:40 am
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Australia sweltered through its hottest month on record in January and the summer of extremes continued with wildfires razing the drought-parched south and flooding in expanses of the tropical north. Australia's Bureau of Meteorology confirmed the January record on Friday...
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In this Jan. 24, 2019, photo, a beachgoer jumps off a jetty at Glenelg Beach in Adelaide, Australia, as temperatures climb to 45 Celsius (113 ‎Fahrenheit). Australia has sweltered through its hottest month on record in January and the summer of extremes continues with wildfires razing the drought-parched south while expanses of the tropical north are flooded. (Kelly Barnes/AAP Image via AP)
February 01, 2019 - 12:52 am
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Australia sweltered through its hottest month on record in January and the summer of extremes continued with wildfires razing the drought-parched south and flooding in expanses of the tropical north. Australia's Bureau of Meteorology confirmed the January record on Friday...
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In this Jan. 24, 2019, photo, a beachgoer jumps off a jetty at Glenelg Beach in Adelaide, Australia, as temperatures climb to 45 Celsius (113 ‎Fahrenheit). Australia has sweltered through its hottest month on record in January and the summer of extremes continues with wildfires razing the drought-parched south while expanses of the tropical north are flooded. (Kelly Barnes/AAP Image via AP)
February 01, 2019 - 12:24 am
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Australia sweltered through its hottest month on record in January and the summer of extremes continued with wildfires razing the drought-parched south and flooding in expanses of the tropical north. Australia's Bureau of Meteorology confirmed the January record on Friday...
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In this Jan. 24, 2019, photo, a beachgoer jumps off a jetty at Glenelg Beach in Adelaide, Australia, as temperatures climb to 45 Celsius (113 ‎Fahrenheit). Australia has sweltered through its hottest month on record in January and the summer of extremes continues with wildfires razing the drought-parched south while expanses of the tropical north are flooded. (Kelly Barnes/AAP Image via AP)
January 31, 2019 - 9:11 pm
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Australia sweltered through its hottest month on record in January and the summer of extremes continued with wildfires razing the drought-parched south and flooding in expanses of the tropical north. Australia's Bureau of Meteorology confirmed the January record on Friday...
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FILE - In this Oct. 11, 2017 file photo, a Pacific Gas & Electric crew works at restoring power along the Old Redwood Highway in Santa Rosa, Calif. Pacific Gas & Electric Co. was not the first utility to declare bankruptcy, not even when it did so in 2001. But when the nation's largest utility filed again for Chapter 11 protection this week, it took a step no utility has in seeking shelter from potentially insurmountable legal bills because the company's power lines are blamed for sparking deadly wildfires. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
January 31, 2019 - 8:16 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Big corporations forced into bankruptcy by liability lawsuits often take the offending product off the market and try to move on. That's what happened with the Dalkon Shield birth control device, asbestos and silicone breast implants. But when the nation's biggest utility,...
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