Environment and nature

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., talks to reporters on the morning after the first public hearing in the impeachment probe of President Donald Trump on his effort to tie U.S. aid for Ukraine to investigations of his political opponents, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 14, 2019. Pelosi says the president's actions in the impeachment inquiry amount to "bribery." (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
November 14, 2019 - 8:52 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says she wants to see Congress pass President Donald Trump’s revamped North American free trade deal this year. In a news conference Thursday, the California Democrat said an agreement on the pact is “imminent.” The United States, Mexico and Canada last...
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FILE - In this May 17, 1999, file photo, two Makah Indian whalers stand atop the carcass of a dead gray whale moments after helping tow it close to shore in the harbor at Neah Bay, Wash. Earlier in the day, Makah Indians hunted and killed the whale in their first successful hunt since voluntarily quitting whaling over 70 years earlier. Two decades after the Makah Indian tribe in the northwestern corner of Washington state conducted its last legal whale hunt from a hand-carved canoe, lawyers, government officials and animal rights activists will gather in a small hearing room in Seattle to determine whether the tribe will be allowed once again to harpoon gray whales as its people had done from time immemorial. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
November 14, 2019 - 7:50 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Patrick DePoe was in high school the last time his Native American tribe in Washington state was allowed to hunt whales. He was on a canoe that greeted the crew towing in the body of a gray whale. His shop class worked to clean the bones and reassemble the skeleton, which hangs in a...
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File - In this Oct. 18, 2017, file photo, Asbestos Removal Technologies Inc., job superintendent Ryan Laitila, right, sprays amended water as job forman Megan Eberhart holds a light during asbestos abatement in Howell, Mich. A federal appeals court says the Trump administration unlawfully excluded millions of tons of some of the most dangerous materials in public use from a safety review. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)
November 14, 2019 - 7:19 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The Trump administration unlawfully excluded millions of tons of some of the most dangerous materials in public use from a safety review, a federal appeals court ruled Thursday. A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said the U.S. Environmental...
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File - In this Oct. 18, 2017, file photo, Asbestos Removal Technologies Inc., job superintendent Ryan Laitila, right, sprays amended water as job forman Megan Eberhart holds a light during asbestos abatement in Howell, Mich. A federal appeals court says the Trump administration unlawfully excluded millions of tons of some of the most dangerous materials in public use from a safety review. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)
November 14, 2019 - 7:08 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The Trump administration unlawfully excluded millions of tons of some of the most dangerous materials in public use from a safety review, a federal appeals court ruled Thursday. A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said the U.S. Environmental...
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November 14, 2019 - 6:49 pm
MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — Most of the local companies that receive power generated by the Tennessee Valley Authority have signed long-term partnership agreements, but some larger customers still have not agreed to the 20-year deals, officials said Thursday. TVA President and CEO Jeff Lyash said during...
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November 14, 2019 - 5:56 pm
MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — Most of the local companies that receive power generated by the Tennessee Valley Authority have signed long-term partnership agreements, but some larger customers still have not agreed to the 20-year deals, officials said Thursday. TVA President and CEO Jeff Lyash said during...
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FILE - In this May 17, 1999, file photo, two Makah Indian whalers stand atop the carcass of a dead gray whale moments after helping tow it close to shore in the harbor at Neah Bay, Wash. Earlier in the day, Makah Indians hunted and killed the whale in their first successful hunt since voluntarily quitting whaling over 70 years earlier. Two decades after the Makah Indian tribe in the northwestern corner of Washington state conducted its last legal whale hunt from a hand-carved canoe, lawyers, government officials and animal rights activists will gather in a small hearing room in Seattle to determine whether the tribe will be allowed once again to harpoon gray whales as its people had done from time immemorial. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
November 14, 2019 - 5:04 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Patrick DePoe was in high school the last time his Native American tribe in Washington state was allowed to hunt whales. He was on a canoe that greeted the crew towing in the body of a gray whale. His shop class worked to clean the bones and reassemble the skeleton, which hangs in a...
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Smoke billows from a plant just outside the French capital, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019 in Paris. The world's thirst for oil will continue to grow until the 2030s, with climate-damaging emissions climbing until at least 2040 — and consumers' insatiable appetite for SUVs is a big reason why. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)
November 14, 2019 - 3:37 pm
BERLIN (AP) — The European Investment Bank said Thursday that it will stop financing fossil fuel energy projects from the end of 2021 as part of an effort to fight climate change. The decision, which ends fossil fuel funding a year later than initially proposed, follows lengthy negotiations among...
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November 14, 2019 - 12:57 pm
DETROIT (AP) — When it comes to buying a new car, the latest and greatest may not be the most dependable. In its annual auto reliability survey this year, Consumer Reports found that while newly redesigned models have the latest infotainment, safety and fuel-economy technology, they also come with...
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In this Sept. 4, 2009 photo provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, corals are seen at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico during an expedition called Reefs, Rigs and Wrecks. Federal regulators are close to approving a protection plan for vulnerable corals in the Gulf of Mexico that would create new protected zones designed to allow the corals to grow. The plan would create 21 protected areas off the coasts of Texas, Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi and Florida (Dr. Ian MacDonald/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration via AP)
November 14, 2019 - 12:37 pm
A plan to protect corals in the Gulf of Mexico is close to becoming a law, drawing cheers from environmental groups who believe leaving the corals alone would help vulnerable ocean ecosystems to grow. The plan would create 21 protected areas off the coasts of Texas, Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi...
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