Environment and nature

File- Picture taken on March 5, 2019 shows a black rhinoceros in the savannah landscape of the Etosha National Park. ( Matthias Toedt/AP via AP)
August 17, 2019 - 10:26 am
GENEVA (AP) — From guitars to traditional medicines and from tusk to tail, mankind's exploitation of the planet's fauna and flora is putting some of them at risk of extinction. Representatives of some 180 nations are meeting in Geneva to agree on protections for vulnerable species, taking up issues...
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Swiss Interior Minister Alain Berset, center, sitting next to Ivonne Higuero, right, CITES Secretary-General ( Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora), delivers his statement, during the opening remarks of the World Wildlife Conference - CITES CoP18, in Geneva, Switzerland, Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019. (Salvatore Di Nolfi/Keystone via AP)
August 17, 2019 - 8:42 am
GENEVA (AP) — From guitars to traditional medicines and from tusk to tail, mankind's exploitation of the planet's fauna and flora is putting some of them at risk of extinction. Representatives of some 180 nations are meeting in Geneva to agree on protections for vulnerable species, taking up issues...
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FILE - In this Thursday, May 23, 2019, file photo, an official of the Department of Marine and Coastal Resources feeds sea-grass spread to Marium, baby dugong lost from her mom in Libong island, Trang province, southern Thailand. The 8-month-old dugong nurtured by marine experts after it was found near a beach in southern Thailand has died of what biologists believe was a combination of shock and ingesting plastic waste. The female dugong - a large ocean mammal - became a hit in Thailand after images of biologists embracing and feeding her with milk and sea grass spread across social media. Last week, she was found bruised after being chased and supposedly attacked by a male dugong during the mating season. (Sirachai Arunrugstichai via AP, File)
August 17, 2019 - 6:59 am
BANGKOK (AP) — An 8-month-old dugong nurtured by marine experts after it was found lost near a beach in southern Thailand has died of what biologists believe was a combination of shock and ingesting plastic waste, officials said Saturday. The female dugong — a large ocean mammal — was named "Marium...
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Swiss Interior Minister Alain Berset, center, sitting next to Ivonne Higuero, right, CITES Secretary-General ( Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora), delivers his statement, during the opening remarks of the World Wildlife Conference - CITES CoP18, in Geneva, Switzerland, Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019. (Salvatore Di Nolfi/Keystone via AP)
August 17, 2019 - 6:55 am
GENEVA (AP) — From guitars to traditional medicines and from tusk to tail, mankind's exploitation of the planet's fauna and flora is putting some of them at risk of extinction. Representatives of some 180 nations are meeting in Geneva to agree on protections for vulnerable species, taking up issues...
Read More
FILE - In this Thursday, May 23, 2019, file photo, an official of the Department of Marine and Coastal Resources feeds sea-grass spread to Marium, baby dugong lost from her mom in Libong island, Trang province, southern Thailand. The 8-month-old dugong nurtured by marine experts after it was found near a beach in southern Thailand has died of what biologists believe was a combination of shock and ingesting plastic waste. The female dugong - a large ocean mammal - became a hit in Thailand after images of biologists embracing and feeding her with milk and sea grass spread across social media. Last week, she was found bruised after being chased and supposedly attacked by a male dugong during the mating season. (Sirachai Arunrugstichai via AP, File)
August 17, 2019 - 5:45 am
BANGKOK (AP) — An 8-month-old dugong nurtured by marine experts after it was found lost near a beach in southern Thailand has died of what biologists believe was a combination of shock and ingesting plastic waste, officials said Saturday. The female dugong — a large ocean mammal — was named "Marium...
Read More
Swiss Interior Minister Alain Berset, center, sitting next to Ivonne Higuero, right, CITES Secretary-General ( Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora), delivers his statement, during the opening remarks of the World Wildlife Conference - CITES CoP18, in Geneva, Switzerland, Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019. (Salvatore Di Nolfi/Keystone via AP)
August 17, 2019 - 4:53 am
GENEVA (AP) — From guitars to traditional medicines and from tusk to tail, mankind's exploitation of the planet's fauna and flora is putting some of them at risk of extinction. Representatives of some 180 nations are meeting in Geneva to agree on protections for vulnerable species, taking up issues...
Read More
FILE - In this Thursday, May 23, 2019, file photo, an official of the Department of Marine and Coastal Resources feeds sea-grass spread to Marium, baby dugong lost from her mom in Libong island, Trang province, southern Thailand. The 8-month-old dugong nurtured by marine experts after it was found near a beach in southern Thailand has died of what biologists believe was a combination of shock and ingesting plastic waste. The female dugong - a large ocean mammal - became a hit in Thailand after images of biologists embracing and feeding her with milk and sea grass spread across social media. Last week, she was found bruised after being chased and supposedly attacked by a male dugong during the mating season. (Sirachai Arunrugstichai via AP, File)
August 17, 2019 - 3:39 am
BANGKOK (AP) — An 8-month-old dugong nurtured by marine experts after it was found lost near a beach in southern Thailand has died of what biologists believe was a combination of shock and ingesting plastic waste. The female dugong — a large ocean mammal — was named "Marium" and became a hit in...
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FILE - In this May 23, 2019, photo, an official of the Department of Marine and Coastal Resources, hugs Marium, baby dugong lost from her mom Libong island, Trang province southern Thailand. The 8-month-old dugong nurtured by marine experts after it was found near a beach in southern Thailand has died of what biologists believe was a combination of shock and ingesting plastic waste. The female dugong - a large ocean mammal - became a hit in Thailand after images of biologists embracing and feeding her with milk and sea grass spread across social media. Last week, she was found bruised after being chased and supposedly attacked by a male dugong during the mating season. (Sirachai Arunrugstichai via AP, File)
August 17, 2019 - 1:17 am
BANGKOK (AP) — An 8-month-old dugong nurtured by marine experts after it was found lost near a beach in southern Thailand has died of what biologists believe was a combination of shock and ingesting plastic waste. The female dugong — a large ocean mammal — was named "Marium" and became a hit in...
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FILE - In this May 21, 1956, file photo, the fireball of a hydrogen bomb lights the Pacific sky a few seconds after the bomb was released over Bikini Atoll. A Texas-based company is facing criticism for naming a beer after the location of nuclear tests that resulted in the contamination of a Pacific island chain, a report said. Manhattan Project Beer Company is under scrutiny by Marshall Islanders who were exposed to high levels of radiation by U.S. government research from 1946 to 1958, The Pacific Daily News reported Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019. (AP Photo, File)
August 17, 2019 - 12:27 am
HAGATNA, Guam (AP) — A Texas-based company is facing criticism for naming a beer after the location of nuclear tests that resulted in the contamination of a Pacific island chain, a report said. Manhattan Project Beer Company is under scrutiny by Marshall Islanders who were exposed to high levels of...
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FILE – In this June 26, 2018 file photo, a Nissan Leaf charges at a recharge station while parked by the Denver City County Building in downtown Denver. The Colorado Air Quality Control Commission approved a new regulation on Friday, Aug. 16, 2019, requiring that at least 5% of the vehicles sold in the state by 2023 emit zero pollution. The rule approved Friday by the state Air Quality Control Commission applies to auto manufactures, not buyers. It's intended to boost the number of electric vehicles in a state struggling to control air pollution in heavily populated areas. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
August 16, 2019 - 4:56 pm
DENVER (AP) — Colorado tightened its air quality regulations on Friday, requiring that at least 5% of the vehicles sold in the state by 2023 emit zero pollution. The state Air Quality Control Commission, which passed the rule on an 8-1 vote, said the requirement applies to auto manufacturers, not...
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