Education issues

FILE - These 2019 file booking photos provided by the University of Connecticut Police Department show UConn students Jarred Mitchell Karal, left, and Ryan Mucaj, who were arrested in 2019 for shouting a racial slur outside a campus apartment complex. They were charged under a 1917 law that makes it a misdemeanor for anyone who ridicules or holds up to contempt certain classes of people. Professors and groups including the American Civil Liberties Union raised free speech concerns after the arrests. A public hearing is scheduled for Friday, Feb. 21, 2020, on a bill before the state legislature's Judiciary Committee that would repeal the law. (UConn Police Department via AP, File)
February 21, 2020 - 2:23 pm
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Free speech concerns that were raised following the arrests of two University of Connecticut students accused of saying a racial slur have led state legislators to consider repealing a century-old law that bans ridicule based on race, religion or nationality. The episode on...
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FILE - These 2019 file booking photos provided by the University of Connecticut Police Department show UConn students Jarred Mitchell Karal, left, and Ryan Mucaj, who were arrested in 2019 for shouting a racial slur outside a campus apartment complex. They were charged under a 1917 law that makes it a misdemeanor for anyone who ridicules or holds up to contempt certain classes of people. Professors and groups including the American Civil Liberties Union raised free speech concerns after the arrests. A public hearing is scheduled for Friday, Feb. 21, 2020, on a bill before the state legislature's Judiciary Committee that would repeal the law. (UConn Police Department via AP, File)
February 21, 2020 - 1:27 pm
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Free speech concerns that were raised following the arrests of two University of Connecticut students accused of saying a racial slur have led state legislators to consider repealing a century-old law that bans ridicule based on race, religion or nationality. The episode on...
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FILE - This Nov. 21, 2019 file photo shows signs posted on windows and doors at Syracuse University displaying anti-racism expressions in Syracuse, N.Y. Syracuse University Chancellor Kent Syverud has lifted the suspensions of 30 student protesters to allow the university to "step back from the edge" and address reports of racist graffiti and other bias-related incidents on campus, he told the university's governing body.(AP Photo/Carolyn Thompson, File)
February 20, 2020 - 2:07 pm
SYRACUSE, N.Y. (AP) — Syracuse University Chancellor Kent Syverud has lifted the suspensions of 30 student protesters to allow the university to "step back from the edge” and address reports of racist graffiti and other bias-related incidents on campus, he told the university's governing body. As...
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February 20, 2020 - 1:53 pm
SYRACUSE, N.Y. (AP) — Syracuse University Chancellor Kent Syverud has lifted the suspensions of 30 student protesters to allow the university to "step back from the edge” and address reports of racist graffiti and other bias-related incidents on campus, he told the university's governing body. As...
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U.S. Attorney Geoffrey Berman points to a photo showing Lawrence Ray during a news conference, Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2020, in New York. Ray, an ex-convict known for his role in a scandal involving former New York police commissioner Bernard Kerik, was charged Tuesday with federal extortion and sex trafficking charges involving a group of students at Sarah Lawrence College. (AP Photo/Jim Mustian)
February 19, 2020 - 2:36 pm
It was the obvious question after news broke that a 50-year-old charged with forcing college students into prostitution met some of them while living with his daughter in campus housing. How could a father — an ex-convict, no less — live undetected or unchecked in his daughter’s dorm? Even the...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018, file photo, students hold their hands in the air as they are evacuated by police from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., after a shooter opened fire on the campus. A Florida law that allows judges to bar anyone deemed dangerous from possessing firearms has been used 3,500 times since its enactment after the 2018 high school massacre. An Associated Press analysis shows the law is being used unevenly around the state. (Mike Stocker/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP, File)
February 14, 2020 - 11:49 am
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — A 23-year-old man who posted on Facebook, “I don't know why I don't go on a killing spree." A West Palm Beach couple who shot up their home while high on cocaine. A 31-year-old Gulf Coast man who pointed a semiautomatic rifle at a motorcyclist. All four Florida...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018, file photo, students hold their hands in the air as they are evacuated by police from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., after a shooter opened fire on the campus. A Florida law that allows judges to bar anyone deemed dangerous from possessing firearms has been used 3,500 times since its enactment after the 2018 high school massacre. An Associated Press analysis shows the law is being used unevenly around the state. (Mike Stocker/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP, File)
February 14, 2020 - 10:07 am
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — A 23-year-old man who posted on Facebook, “I don't know why I don't go on a killing spree." A West Palm Beach couple who shot up their home while high on cocaine. A 31-year-old Gulf Coast man who pointed a semiautomatic rifle at a motorcyclist. All four Florida...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018, file photo, students hold their hands in the air as they are evacuated by police from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., after a shooter opened fire on the campus. A Florida law that allows judges to bar anyone deemed dangerous from possessing firearms has been used 3,500 times since its enactment after the 2018 high school massacre. An Associated Press analysis shows the law is being used unevenly around the state. (Mike Stocker/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP, File)
February 14, 2020 - 10:02 am
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — A 23-year-old man who posted on Facebook, “I don't know why I don't go on a killing spree." A West Palm Beach couple who shot up their home while high on cocaine. A 31-year-old Gulf Coast man who pointed a semiautomatic rifle at a motorcyclist. All four Florida...
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February 14, 2020 - 9:51 am
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A California man pleaded not guilty on Friday to a charge of threatening a shooting at Ohio State University and vowing to hurt players on the football team. An indictment unsealed late last year in federal court in Columbus accuses Daniel Rippy of making the “electronic...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018, file photo, students hold their hands in the air as they are evacuated by police from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., after a shooter opened fire on the campus. A Florida law that allows judges to bar anyone deemed dangerous from possessing firearms has been used 3,500 times since its enactment after the 2018 high school massacre. An Associated Press analysis shows the law is being used unevenly around the state. (Mike Stocker/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP, File)
February 14, 2020 - 9:24 am
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — A 23-year-old man who posted on Facebook, “I don't know why I don't go on a killing spree." A West Palm Beach couple who shot up their home while high on cocaine. A 31-year-old Gulf Coast man who pointed a semiautomatic rifle at a motorcyclist. All four Florida...
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