Earth science

Rescuers search at a damaged building after a magnitude 6.4 earthquake in Thumane, western Albania, Tuesday, Nov. 26, 2019. Rescue crews used excavators to search for survivors trapped in toppled apartment buildings after a powerful pre-dawn earthquake in Albania killed at least six people and injured more than 300. (AP Photo/Visar Kryeziu)
November 26, 2019 - 6:30 am
TIRANA, Albania (AP) — The Latest on a strong earthquake in Albania (all times local): 12:25 p.m. Albania’s Defense Ministry says five more bodies have been recovered following a powerful earthquake, bringing the death toll to 14. The Health Ministry is reporting that around 600 people have been...
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Rescuers search at a damaged building after a magnitude 6.4 earthquake in Thumane, western Albania, Tuesday, Nov. 26, 2019. Rescue crews used excavators to search for survivors trapped in toppled apartment buildings after a powerful pre-dawn earthquake in Albania killed at least six people and injured more than 300. (AP Photo/Visar Kryeziu)
November 26, 2019 - 5:52 am
TIRANA, Albania (AP) — The Latest on a strong earthquake in Albania (all times local): 11:50 a.m. Albania’s Defense Ministry says another body has been recovered in a northern town from the rubble of an earthquake, bringing the death toll to nine. The ministry said the body was found in Thumane, 35...
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People stand next to a damaged building after a magnitude 6.4 earthquake in Durres, western Albania, Tuesday, Nov. 26, 2019. A strong earthquake has shaken Albania, killing at least four people, injuring 150 and collapsing buildings. (AP Photo/Hektor Pustina)
November 26, 2019 - 4:56 am
TIRANA, Albania (AP) — The Latest on a strong earthquake in Albania (all times local): 10:50 a.m. The European Union is sending condolences to the people of Albania after an earthquake killed at least seven and says it stands ready with emergency aid should it be required. The EU’s top diplomat and...
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People stand next to a damaged building after a magnitude 6.4 earthquake in Durres, western Albania, Tuesday, Nov. 26, 2019. A strong earthquake has shaken Albania, killing at least four people, injuring 150 and collapsing buildings. (AP Photo/Hektor Pustina)
November 26, 2019 - 4:42 am
TIRANA, Albania (AP) — The Latest on a strong earthquake in Albania (all times local): 10:40 a.m. Seismologists say a strong earthquake has rattled southern Bosnia, several hours after a deadly quake struck in nearby Albania. The GFZ German Research Center for Geosciences, which monitors global...
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In this undated photo, two men look down a shaft in Kaktovik, Alaska, leading to a new community ice cellar, a type of underground food cache dug into the permafrost to provide natural refrigeration used for generations in far-north communities. Naturally cooled underground ice cellars, used in Alaska Native communities for generations, are becoming increasingly unreliable as a warming climate and other factors touch multiple facets of life in the far north. (Marnie Isaacs/Kaktovik Community Foundation via AP)
November 25, 2019 - 1:17 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — For generations, people in Alaska’s far-north villages have relied on hand-built ice cellars dug deep into the permafrost to age their whale and walrus meat to perfection and keep it cold throughout the year. Scores of the naturally refrigerated food caches lie beneath...
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This May 3, 2009, photo taken in Point Hope, Alaska, provided by the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, shows the entrance to an ice cellar, a type of underground food dug into the permafrost to provide natural refrigeration used for generations in far-north communities. Naturally cooled underground ice cellars, used in Alaska Native communities for generations, are becoming increasingly unreliable as a warming climate and other factors touch multiple facets of life in the far north. (Mike Brubaker/Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium via AP)
November 25, 2019 - 9:22 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — For generations, people in Alaska’s far-north whaling villages have relied on hand-built ice cellars dug deep into the permafrost to age their subsistence food to perfection and keep it cold throughout the year. Scores of the naturally refrigerated food caches lie beneath...
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This May 3, 2009, photo taken in Point Hope, Alaska, provided by the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, shows the entrance to an ice cellar, a type of underground food dug into the permafrost to provide natural refrigeration used for generations in far-north communities. Naturally cooled underground ice cellars, used in Alaska Native communities for generations, are becoming increasingly unreliable as a warming climate and other factors touch multiple facets of life in the far north. (Mike Brubaker/Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium via AP)
November 25, 2019 - 1:03 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — For generations, people in Alaska’s far-north whaling villages have relied on hand-built ice cellars dug deep into the permafrost to age their subsistence food to perfection and keep it cold throughout the year. Scores of the naturally refrigerated food caches lie beneath...
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In this Nov. 14, 2019, photo provided by John Guillote and taken from an aerial drone shows the U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq as it makes its way through sea ice in the Beaufort Sea off Alaska's north coast. University of Washington scientists onboard the research vessel are studying the changes and how less sea ice will affect coastlines, which already are vulnerable to erosion because increased waves delivered by storms. More erosion would increase the chance of winter flooding in villages and danger to hunters in small boats. (John Guillote via AP)
November 19, 2019 - 5:58 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq can break through ice as thick as 2.5 feet (0.76 meters). In the Chukchi Sea northwest of Alaska this month, which should be brimming with floes, its limits likely won’t be tested. University of Washington researchers left Nome on Nov. 7 on...
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In this Nov. 14, 2019, photo provided by John Guillote and taken from an aerial drone shows the U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq as it makes its way through sea ice in the Beaufort Sea off Alaska's north coast. University of Washington scientists onboard the research vessel are studying the changes and how less sea ice will affect coastlines, which already are vulnerable to erosion because increased waves delivered by storms. More erosion would increase the chance of winter flooding in villages and danger to hunters in small boats. (John Guillote via AP)
November 19, 2019 - 1:03 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq can break through ice as thick as 2.5 feet (0.76 meters). In the Chukchi Sea northwest of Alaska this month, which should be brimming with floes, its limits likely won’t be tested. University of Washington researchers left Nome on Nov. 7 on...
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In this Nov. 14, 2019, photo provided by John Guillote and taken from an aerial drone shows the U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq as it makes its way through sea ice in the Beaufort Sea off Alaska's north coast. University of Washington scientists onboard the research vessel are studying the changes and how less sea ice will affect coastlines, which already are vulnerable to erosion because increased waves delivered by storms. More erosion would increase the chance of winter flooding in villages and danger to hunters in small boats. (John Guillote via AP)
November 19, 2019 - 9:50 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq can break through ice as thick as 2.5 feet (0.76 meters). In the Chukchi Sea northwest of Alaska this month, which should be brimming with floes, its limits likely won’t be tested. University of Washington researchers left Nome on Nov. 7 on...
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