Earth science

In this Nov. 14, 2019, photo provided by John Guillote and taken from an aerial drone shows the U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq as it makes its way through sea ice in the Beaufort Sea off Alaska's north coast. University of Washington scientists onboard the research vessel are studying the changes and how less sea ice will affect coastlines, which already are vulnerable to erosion because increased waves delivered by storms. More erosion would increase the chance of winter flooding in villages and danger to hunters in small boats. (John Guillote via AP)
November 19, 2019 - 9:50 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq can break through ice as thick as 2.5 feet (0.76 meters). In the Chukchi Sea northwest of Alaska this month, which should be brimming with floes, its limits likely won’t be tested. University of Washington researchers left Nome on Nov. 7 on...
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In this Nov. 14, 2019, photo provided by John Guillote and taken from an aerial drone shows the U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq as it makes its way through sea ice in the Beaufort Sea off Alaska's north coast. University of Washington scientists onboard the research vessel are studying the changes and how less sea ice will affect coastlines, which already are vulnerable to erosion because increased waves delivered by storms. More erosion would increase the chance of winter flooding in villages and danger to hunters in small boats. (John Guillote via AP)
November 19, 2019 - 1:11 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq can break through ice as thick as 2.5 feet (0.76 meters). In the Chukchi Sea northwest of Alaska this month, which should be brimming with floes, its limits likely won’t be tested. University of Washington researchers left Nome on Nov. 7 on...
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FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2017 photo, boats are shown moored in the Anclote River near the old Stauffer chemical plant site in Tarpon Springs, Fla. Hundreds of the nation's most polluted places are at an increasing risk of spreading contamination beyond their borders by more frequent storms and rising seas. Sixty percent of U.S. Superfund sites are in danger from weather extremes like hurricanes or wildfires, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to acknowledge and plan for climate change is hurting chances of safeguarding them, according to a government watchdog. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)
November 18, 2019 - 10:10 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — At least 60% of U.S. Superfund sites are in areas vulnerable to flooding or other worsening disasters of climate change, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to directly acknowledge global warming is deterring efforts to safeguard them, a congressional watchdog agency says...
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FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2017 photo, boats are shown moored in the Anclote River near the old Stauffer chemical plant site in Tarpon Springs, Fla. Hundreds of the nation's most polluted places are at an increasing risk of spreading contamination beyond their borders by more frequent storms and rising seas. Sixty percent of U.S. Superfund sites are in danger from weather extremes like hurricanes or wildfires, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to acknowledge and plan for climate change is hurting chances of safeguarding them, according to a government watchdog. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)
November 18, 2019 - 9:36 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — At least 60% of U.S. Superfund sites are in areas vulnerable to flooding or other worsening disasters of climate change, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to directly acknowledge global warming is deterring efforts to safeguard them, a congressional watchdog agency says...
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FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2017 photo, boats are shown moored in the Anclote River near the old Stauffer chemical plant site in Tarpon Springs, Fla. Hundreds of the nation's most polluted places are at an increasing risk of spreading contamination beyond their borders by more frequent storms and rising seas. Sixty percent of U.S. Superfund sites are in danger from weather extremes like hurricanes or wildfires, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to acknowledge and plan for climate change is hurting chances of safeguarding them, according to a government watchdog. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)
November 18, 2019 - 7:35 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — At least 60% of U.S. Superfund sites are in areas vulnerable to flooding or other worsening disasters of climate change, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to directly acknowledge global warming is deterring efforts to safeguard them, a congressional watchdog agency says...
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FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2017 photo, boats are shown moored in the Anclote River near the old Stauffer chemical plant site in Tarpon Springs, Fla. Hundreds of the nation's most polluted places are at an increasing risk of spreading contamination beyond their borders by more frequent storms and rising seas. Sixty percent of U.S. Superfund sites are in danger from weather extremes like hurricanes or wildfires, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to acknowledge and plan for climate change is hurting chances of safeguarding them, according to a government watchdog. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)
November 18, 2019 - 6:06 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — At least 60 percent of U.S. Superfund sites are in areas vulnerable to flooding or other worsening disasters of climate change, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to directly acknowledge global warming is deterring efforts to safeguard them, a congressional watchdog agency...
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FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2017 photo, boats are shown moored in the Anclote River near the old Stauffer chemical plant site in Tarpon Springs, Fla. Hundreds of the nation's most polluted places are at an increasing risk of spreading contamination beyond their borders by more frequent storms and rising seas. Sixty percent of U.S. Superfund sites are in danger from weather extremes like hurricanes or wildfires, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to acknowledge and plan for climate change is hurting chances of safeguarding them, according to a government watchdog. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)
November 18, 2019 - 5:38 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — At least 60 percent of U.S. Superfund sites are in areas vulnerable to flooding or other worsening disasters of climate change, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to directly acknowledge global warming is deterring efforts to safeguard them, a congressional watchdog agency...
Read More
FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2017 photo, boats are shown moored in the Anclote River near the old Stauffer chemical plant site in Tarpon Springs, Fla. Hundreds of the nation's most polluted places are at an increasing risk of spreading contamination beyond their borders by more frequent storms and rising seas. Sixty percent of U.S. Superfund sites are in danger from weather extremes like hurricanes or wildfires, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to acknowledge and plan for climate change is hurting chances of safeguarding them, according to a government watchdog. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)
November 18, 2019 - 4:14 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — At least 60 percent of U.S. Superfund sites are in areas vulnerable to flooding or other worsening disasters of climate change, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to directly acknowledge global warming is deterring efforts to safeguard them, a congressional watchdog agency...
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A man holds up a phone during a video call to show a a flooded alley outside a shop, in Venice, Italy, Friday, Nov. 15, 2019. Exceptionally high tidal waters returned to Venice on Friday, prompting the mayor to close the iconic St. Mark's Square and call for donations to repair the Italian lagoon city just three days after it experienced its worst flooding in 50 years. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)
November 15, 2019 - 4:46 pm
VENICE, Italy (AP) — The historic lagoon city of Venice exists on the edge of a double threat: As it sinks, the seas rise. That reality became more stark this week when Venice was hit with its worst flood in over 50 years, caused by a nearly 1.9 meter (6-foot) tide that sent waist-high water...
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A man holds up a phone during a video call to show a a flooded alley outside a shop, in Venice, Italy, Friday, Nov. 15, 2019. Exceptionally high tidal waters returned to Venice on Friday, prompting the mayor to close the iconic St. Mark's Square and call for donations to repair the Italian lagoon city just three days after it experienced its worst flooding in 50 years. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)
November 15, 2019 - 3:04 pm
VENICE, Italy (AP) — The historic lagoon city of Venice exists on the edge of a double threat: As it sinks, the seas rise. That reality became more stark this week when Venice was hit with its worst flood in over 50 years, caused by a nearly 1.9 meter (6-foot) tide that sent waist-high water...
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