Drug abuse

FILE - In this Oct. 14, 2008, a small child walks toward the front door of the Public Health Service Indian Hospital on the Standing Rock Reservation in Fort Yates. N.D. A federal audit released Monday, July 22, 2019, finds that government hospitals placed Native Americans at increased risk for opioid abuse and overdoses. The audit says a handful of Indian Health Service hospitals, including the Fort Yates Hospital, failed to follow the agency’s protocols for dispensing and prescribing the drug. The Indian Health Service agreed with the more than a dozen recommendations and says changes are in the works. (AP Photo/Will Kincaid, File)
July 22, 2019 - 4:14 pm
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — U.S. government hospitals put Native American patients at increased risk for opioid abuse and overdoses, failing to follow their own protocols for prescribing and dispensing the drugs, according to a federal audit made public Monday. The report by the U.S. Department of...
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FILE - In this Oct. 14, 2008, a small child walks toward the front door of the Public Health Service Indian Hospital on the Standing Rock Reservation in Fort Yates. N.D. A federal audit released Monday, July 22, 2019, finds that government hospitals placed Native Americans at increased risk for opioid abuse and overdoses. The audit says a handful of Indian Health Service hospitals, including the Fort Yates Hospital, failed to follow the agency’s protocols for dispensing and prescribing the drug. The Indian Health Service agreed with the more than a dozen recommendations and says changes are in the works. (AP Photo/Will Kincaid, File)
July 22, 2019 - 2:29 pm
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — U.S. government hospitals placed Native American patients at increased risk for opioid abuse and overdoses, failing to follow their own protocols for prescribing and dispensing the drugs, according to a federal audit made public Monday. The report by the U.S. Department of...
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FILE - In this Aug. 17, 2018 file photo, Christine Gagnon, of Southington, Conn., holds a sign during a protest with others who have lost loved ones to OxyContin and opioid overdoses, outside the Purdue Pharma headquarters in Stamford, Conn. Gagnon lost her son Michael 13 months earlier. Nearly ten years ago, the blockbuster painkiller OxyContin was reformulated to discourage abuse by snorting and injecting, but it's unclear whether the harder-to-abuse format has decreased cases of addiction, overdose and death. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)
July 22, 2019 - 12:32 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Dr. Raeford Brown was uniquely positioned to help the U.S. government answer a critical question: Is a new version of the painkiller OxyContin helping fight the national opioid epidemic? An expert in pain treatment at the University of Kentucky, Brown led a panel of outside...
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FILE - In this Aug. 17, 2018 file photo, Christine Gagnon, of Southington, Conn., holds a sign during a protest with others who have lost loved ones to OxyContin and opioid overdoses, outside the Purdue Pharma headquarters in Stamford, Conn. Gagnon lost her son Michael 13 months earlier. Nearly ten years ago, the blockbuster painkiller OxyContin was reformulated to discourage abuse by snorting and injecting, but it's unclear whether the harder-to-abuse format has decreased cases of addiction, overdose and death. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)
July 22, 2019 - 10:42 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Dr. Raeford Brown was uniquely positioned to help the U.S. government answer a critical question: Is a new version of the painkiller OxyContin helping fight the national opioid epidemic? An expert in pain treatment at the University of Kentucky, Brown led a panel of outside...
Read More
FILE - In this Aug. 17, 2018 file photo, Christine Gagnon, of Southington, Conn., holds a sign during a protest with others who have lost loved ones to OxyContin and opioid overdoses, outside the Purdue Pharma headquarters in Stamford, Conn. Gagnon lost her son Michael 13 months earlier. Nearly ten years ago, the blockbuster painkiller OxyContin was reformulated to discourage abuse by snorting and injecting, but it's unclear whether the harder-to-abuse format has decreased cases of addiction, overdose and death. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)
July 22, 2019 - 10:37 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly a decade ago, the maker of OxyContin responded to a growing wave of opioid abuse by making the painkiller harder to snort and inject. But has that reformulation translated into fewer drug overdoses and deaths? It's a question that experts like Dr. Raeford Brown of the...
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FILE - In this Oct. 14, 2008, a small child walks toward the front door of the Public Health Service Indian Hospital on the Standing Rock Reservation in Fort Yates. N.D. A federal audit released Monday, July 22, 2019, finds that government hospitals placed Native Americans at increased risk for opioid abuse and overdoses. The audit says a handful of Indian Health Service hospitals, including the Fort Yates Hospital, failed to follow the agency’s protocols for dispensing and prescribing the drug. The Indian Health Service agreed with the more than a dozen recommendations and says changes are in the works. (AP Photo/Will Kincaid, File)
July 22, 2019 - 12:08 am
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Government hospitals placed Native American patients at increased risk for opioid abuse and overdoses, failing to follow their own protocols for prescribing and dispensing the drugs, according to a federal audit released Monday. The report by the U.S. Department of Health...
Read More
In this Monday, July 8, 2019 photo, Troy Young, a hemp grower in North Salt Lake, stops for breakfast at a nearby coffee shop before returning to his indoor grow facility. Young, who recently applied for a medical marijuana growers license in Utah, lost his mother to an opioid addiction. If she had access to less destructive pain-relieving drug, like marijuana, Young said maybe she'd still be alive. (AP Photo/Morgan Smith)
July 12, 2019 - 4:25 pm
NEPHI, Utah (AP) — The wide metal barn on the Utah alfalfa farm owned by Russell and Diane Jones will host their youngest son's wedding next month. By September, they hope the structure will be full of marijuana plants. The Joneses are fourth-generation farmers, members of The Church of Jesus...
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In this Monday, July 8, 2019 photo, Troy Young, a hemp grower in North Salt Lake, stops for breakfast at a nearby coffee shop before returning to his indoor grow facility. Young, who recently applied for a medical marijuana growers license in Utah, lost his mother to an opioid addiction. If she had access to less destructive pain-relieving drug, like marijuana, Young said maybe she'd still be alive. (AP Photo/Morgan Smith)
July 12, 2019 - 12:38 pm
NEPHI, Utah (AP) — The wide metal barn on the Utah alfalfa farm owned by Russell and Diane Jones will host their youngest son's wedding next month. By September, they hope the structure will be full of marijuana plants. The Joneses are fourth-generation farmers, members of The Church of Jesus...
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Dr. Nora Volkow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, works in the MRI lab at the National Institutes of Health’s research hospital in Bethesda, Md., on Thursday May 16, 2019. Volkow is studying how anti-addiction medicines work inside the brains of people undergoing treatment for opioid abuse. In the background are NIH neuroimaging specialists Dana Feldman and Danielle Kroll. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
July 09, 2019 - 11:49 am
BETHESDA, Md. (AP) — Lying inside a scanner, the patient watched as pictures appeared one by one: A bicycle. A cupcake. Heroin. Outside, researchers tracked her brain's reactions to the surprise sight of the drug she'd fought to kick. Government scientists are starting to peek into the brains of...
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This June 26, 2019, photo shows customs officials display seized drugs at the customs office in Sepang. Malaysia's government has announced plans to remove criminal penalties for the possession and use of drugs in small quantity to battle addiction, but stressed the move is not akin to legalizing drugs. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian)
June 28, 2019 - 1:03 am
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — Malaysia's government plans to drop criminal penalties for the possession and use of drugs in small quantities to battle addiction, but stressed the move is not akin to legalizing narcotics. Malaysia has one of the world's harshest penalties for drug possession. Anyone...
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