Drug abuse

FILE - In a Thursday, Dec. 13, 2018 file photo, Ohio Gov. John Kasich sits for an interview with The Associated Press in Columbus. West Virginia University President Gordon Gee and former Ohio Gov. John Kasich are creating a nonprofit that will fight to steer money from any national opioid settlement to hospitals and health-based research. Gee and Kasich will announce Citizens for Effective Opioid Treatment on Thursday, August 22, 2019. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
August 22, 2019 - 4:11 pm
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — West Virginia University President Gordon Gee and former Ohio Gov. John Kasich are creating a nonprofit that will fight to steer cash from any national opioid settlement to hospitals, rather than to local and state governments already sparring for control of the dollars. Gee...
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FILE - In a Thursday, Dec. 13, 2018 file photo, Ohio Gov. John Kasich sits for an interview with The Associated Press in Columbus. West Virginia University President Gordon Gee and former Ohio Gov. John Kasich are creating a nonprofit that will fight to steer money from any national opioid settlement to hospitals and health-based research. Gee and Kasich will announce Citizens for Effective Opioid Treatment on Thursday, August 22, 2019. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
August 22, 2019 - 5:21 am
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — West Virginia University President Gordon Gee and former Ohio Gov. John Kasich are creating a nonprofit that will fight to steer cash from any national opioid settlement to hospitals, rather than to local and state governments already sparring for control of the dollars. Gee...
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U.S. Attorney David Anderson announces a new federal crime-fighting initiative in San Francisco on Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2019. Seventeen federal law enforcement agencies will team up for a yearlong crackdown on a notorious area of San Francisco where open drug use has been tolerated for years. (AP Photo/Samantha Maldonado)
August 07, 2019 - 8:31 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The first step in a sweeping crackdown on crime ranging from drugs to sex trafficking in a notorious San Francisco neighborhood yielded 32 arrests of mostly Honduran nationals tied to two international operations that poured heroin and cocaine into the community, U.S...
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U.S. Attorney David Anderson announces a new federal crime-fighting initiative in San Francisco on Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2019. Seventeen federal law enforcement agencies will team up for a yearlong crackdown on a notorious area of San Francisco where open drug use has been tolerated for years. (AP Photo/Samantha Maldonado)
August 07, 2019 - 7:35 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The first step in a sweeping crackdown on crime ranging from drugs to sex trafficking in a notorious San Francisco neighborhood yielded 32 arrests of mostly Honduran nationals tied to two international operations that poured heroin and cocaine into the community, U.S...
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Protesters, including Carol Lorento, center, gather outside a courthouse on Friday, Aug. 2, 2019, in Boston, where a judge was to hear arguments in Massachusetts' lawsuit against Purdue Pharma over its role in the national drug epidemic. Organizers said they wanted to continue to put pressure on the Connecticut pharmaceutical company and the Sackler family that owns it. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
August 02, 2019 - 1:45 pm
BOSTON (AP) — They came bearing oversized images of the sons and daughters they lost to drug overdoses and signs demanding justice from the pharmaceutical company they hold most responsible. The parents and their supporters rallied outside a Boston courthouse Friday as a judge heard arguments in...
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Protesters, including Carol Lorento, center, gather outside a courthouse on Friday, Aug. 2, 2019, in Boston, where a judge was to hear arguments in Massachusetts' lawsuit against Purdue Pharma over its role in the national drug epidemic. Organizers said they wanted to continue to put pressure on the Connecticut pharmaceutical company and the Sackler family that owns it. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
August 02, 2019 - 10:47 am
BOSTON (AP) — Parents who lost children to fatal overdoses and other addiction recovery activists are rallying outside a Boston courthouse Friday as a judge hears arguments in Massachusetts' lawsuit against Purdue Pharma over its role in the national drug epidemic. About 100 protesters gathered in...
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This photo taken Monday, May 13, 2019, shows Karen Guttensen and Ingvar Ingolfsson, right, both 14-years old, outside the Tjornin youth center in Reykjavik, Iceland, on a bright summer night. The island nation in the North Atlantic has dried up a teenage culture of drinking and smoking by focusing on local participation in music and sports options for students, with such success that Icelandic teens now have one of the lowest rates of substance abuse in Europe. (AP Photo/Egill Bjarnason)
July 31, 2019 - 9:45 am
REYKJAVIK, Iceland (AP) — The clock strikes 10 p.m. on a Friday night when the "Parent Patrol" enters a popular playground in suburban Reykjavik. The teens turn down the music and reach for their phones to check the time: It's ticking into curfew. Every weekend, parents all over the Icelandic...
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FILE - In this Oct. 14, 2008, a small child walks toward the front door of the Public Health Service Indian Hospital on the Standing Rock Reservation in Fort Yates. N.D. A federal audit released Monday, July 22, 2019, finds that government hospitals placed Native Americans at increased risk for opioid abuse and overdoses. The audit says a handful of Indian Health Service hospitals, including the Fort Yates Hospital, failed to follow the agency’s protocols for dispensing and prescribing the drug. The Indian Health Service agreed with the more than a dozen recommendations and says changes are in the works. (AP Photo/Will Kincaid, File)
July 22, 2019 - 7:59 pm
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — U.S. government hospitals put Native American patients at increased risk for opioid abuse and overdoses, failing to follow their own protocols for prescribing and dispensing the drugs, according to a federal audit made public Monday. The report by the U.S. Department of...
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FILE - In this Oct. 14, 2008, a small child walks toward the front door of the Public Health Service Indian Hospital on the Standing Rock Reservation in Fort Yates. N.D. A federal audit released Monday, July 22, 2019, finds that government hospitals placed Native Americans at increased risk for opioid abuse and overdoses. The audit says a handful of Indian Health Service hospitals, including the Fort Yates Hospital, failed to follow the agency’s protocols for dispensing and prescribing the drug. The Indian Health Service agreed with the more than a dozen recommendations and says changes are in the works. (AP Photo/Will Kincaid, File)
July 22, 2019 - 4:22 pm
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — U.S. government hospitals put Native American patients at increased risk for opioid abuse and overdoses, failing to follow their own protocols for prescribing and dispensing the drugs, according to a federal audit made public Monday. The report by the U.S. Department of...
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FILE - In this Oct. 14, 2008, a small child walks toward the front door of the Public Health Service Indian Hospital on the Standing Rock Reservation in Fort Yates. N.D. A federal audit released Monday, July 22, 2019, finds that government hospitals placed Native Americans at increased risk for opioid abuse and overdoses. The audit says a handful of Indian Health Service hospitals, including the Fort Yates Hospital, failed to follow the agency’s protocols for dispensing and prescribing the drug. The Indian Health Service agreed with the more than a dozen recommendations and says changes are in the works. (AP Photo/Will Kincaid, File)
July 22, 2019 - 4:14 pm
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — U.S. government hospitals put Native American patients at increased risk for opioid abuse and overdoses, failing to follow their own protocols for prescribing and dispensing the drugs, according to a federal audit made public Monday. The report by the U.S. Department of...
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