Drug abuse

In this April 26, 2018 photo, David Humes stands outside Legislative Hall, the state capitol building, in Dover, Del. Humes, whose son died from a heroin overdose in 2012, has been pushing for an opioid tax in Delaware, which did not increase funding for addiction treatment in 2017 as it struggles to balance its budget. “When you think about the fact that each year more people are dying, if you leave the money the same, you’re not keeping up with this public health crisis,” he said. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)nydi
April 28, 2018 - 8:48 am
ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Lawmakers across the country are testing a strategy to boost treatment for opioid addicts as their states confront a rising death toll from drug overdoses. They want to force drug manufacturers and their distributors to pay for it. Bills introduced in at least 15 states would...
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In this image made from surveillance video provided Thursday, April 19, 2018, by the Carver County Sheriff's Office, as part of an investigative file into Prince's death, the superstar, center, enters a clinic of Dr. Michael Todd Schulenberg on April 20, 2016, the day before he was found dead of an accidental fentanyl overdose. The doctor is not facing criminal charges and his attorney says he had no role in Prince's death. (Carver County Sheriff's Office via AP)
April 19, 2018 - 8:19 pm
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Prince thought he was taking a common painkiller but instead ingested a counterfeit pill containing the dangerously powerful drug fentanyl, a Minnesota prosecutor said Thursday as he announced that no charges would be filed in the musician's death. Carver County Attorney Mark...
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FILE - In this Feb. 4, 2007 file photo, Prince performs during halftime of the Super Bowl XLI football game in Miami. Minnesota prosecutors are planning an announcement Thursday, April 19, 2018, in their two-year investigation into Prince's death. Prince was found alone and unresponsive in an elevator at his Paisley Park estate on April 21, 2016. An autopsy found he died of an accidental overdose of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid 50 times more powerful than heroin. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)
April 19, 2018 - 6:57 pm
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Prince thought he was taking a common painkiller but instead ingested a counterfeit pill containing the dangerously powerful drug fentanyl, a Minnesota prosecutor said Thursday as he announced that no charges would be filed in the musician's death. Carver County Attorney Mark...
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FILE - In this Feb. 4, 2007 file photo, Prince performs during halftime of the Super Bowl XLI football game in Miami. Minnesota prosecutors are planning an announcement Thursday, April 19, 2018, in their two-year investigation into Prince's death. Prince was found alone and unresponsive in an elevator at his Paisley Park estate on April 21, 2016. An autopsy found he died of an accidental overdose of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid 50 times more powerful than heroin. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)
April 19, 2018 - 5:45 pm
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Prince thought he was taking a common painkiller but instead ingested a counterfeit pill containing the dangerously powerful drug fentanyl, a Minnesota prosecutor said Thursday as he announced that no charges would be filed in the musician's death. Carver County Attorney Mark...
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FILE - In this Feb. 4, 2007 file photo, Prince performs during halftime of the Super Bowl XLI football game in Miami. Minnesota prosecutors are planning an announcement Thursday, April 19, 2018, in their two-year investigation into Prince's death. Prince was found alone and unresponsive in an elevator at his Paisley Park estate on April 21, 2016. An autopsy found he died of an accidental overdose of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid 50 times more powerful than heroin. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)
April 19, 2018 - 3:19 pm
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Prince thought he was taking a common painkiller and probably did not know a counterfeit pill he ingested contained fentanyl, a Minnesota prosecutor said Thursday as he announced that no charges would be filed in the musician's death. Carver County Attorney Mark Metz said Prince...
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FILE - In this Feb. 4, 2007 file photo, Prince performs during halftime of the Super Bowl XLI football game in Miami. Minnesota prosecutors are planning an announcement Thursday, April 19, 2018, in their two-year investigation into Prince's death. Prince was found alone and unresponsive in an elevator at his Paisley Park estate on April 21, 2016. An autopsy found he died of an accidental overdose of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid 50 times more powerful than heroin. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)
April 19, 2018 - 11:34 am
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A Minnesota doctor accused of illegally prescribing an opioid painkiller for Prince a week before the musician died from a fentanyl overdose has agreed to pay $30,000 to settle a federal civil violation, according to documents made public Thursday. The settlement between the U.S...
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FILE - In this Feb. 4, 2007 file photo, Prince performs during halftime of the Super Bowl XLI football game in Miami. Minnesota prosecutors are planning an announcement Thursday, April 19, 2018, in their two-year investigation into Prince's death. Prince was found alone and unresponsive in an elevator at his Paisley Park estate on April 21, 2016. An autopsy found he died of an accidental overdose of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid 50 times more powerful than heroin. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)
April 19, 2018 - 11:01 am
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A Minnesota doctor accused of illegally prescribing an opioid painkiller for Prince a week before the musician died from a fentanyl overdose has agreed to pay $30,000 to settle a federal civil violation, according to documents made public Thursday. The settlement between the U.S...
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April 18, 2018 - 12:47 pm
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Prosecutors in the Minnesota county where Prince died said Wednesday that they're ready to make an announcement in their two-year investigation into the musician's death from an accidental fentanyl overdose. Carver County Attorney Mark Metz was scheduled to announce at 11:30 a.m...
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In this April, 11, 2018, photo, Dr. Deborah Richter, a family medicine and addiction treatment doctor, talks with a reporter at the Vermont Statehouse in Montpelier, Vt. Deep within President Donald Trump’s plan to combat opioid abuse, overshadowed by his call for the death penalty for some drug traffickers, is a push to expand the use of medication to treat addiction. It’s a rare instance in which Trump is building on Obama administration policies, and where fractious Republicans and Democrats in Congress have come together. Richter, says medications have helped her patients, especially when combined with counseling. “People got back to what they were before the addiction seized them,” she said. As a doctor, “it was on a personal level so rewarding to save other mothers’ children.” (AP Photo/Lisa Rathke)
April 16, 2018 - 6:57 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Deep within President Donald Trump's plan to combat opioid abuse, overshadowed by his call for the death penalty for some drug traffickers, is a push to expand the use of medication to treat addiction. It's a rare instance in which Trump isn't trying roll back Obama administration...
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In this April, 11, 2018, photo, Dr. Deborah Richter, a family medicine and addiction treatment doctor, talks with a reporter at the Vermont Statehouse in Montpelier, Vt. Deep within President Donald Trump’s plan to combat opioid abuse, overshadowed by his call for the death penalty for some drug traffickers, is a push to expand the use of medication to treat addiction. It’s a rare instance in which Trump is building on Obama administration policies, and where fractious Republicans and Democrats in Congress have come together. Richter, says medications have helped her patients, especially when combined with counseling. “People got back to what they were before the addiction seized them,” she said. As a doctor, “it was on a personal level so rewarding to save other mothers’ children.” (AP Photo/Lisa Rathke)
April 16, 2018 - 1:45 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Deep within President Donald Trump's plan to combat opioid abuse, overshadowed by his call for the death penalty for some drug traffickers, is a push to expand the use of medication to treat addiction. It's a rare instance in which Trump isn't trying roll back Obama administration...
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