Drug abuse

CORRECTS TO CAPITAL, NOT CAPITOL- In this Nov. 14, 2019 photo, Jamie Cline poses for a photo behind a glass window in a door at the Olympia Bupe Clinic at the Capital Recovery Center in Olympia, Wash., which helps people addicted to heroin and other opiates get prescriptions for buprenorphine, a medicine that prevents withdrawal sickness in people trying to stop using opiates. At the clinic, a doctor is working to spread a philosophy called "medication first," which scraps requirements for counseling, abstinence or even a commitment to recovery in the battle against opioid addiction. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
December 18, 2019 - 2:36 pm
OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — Every time she got out of jail, Jamie Cline started hustling again for heroin, driven by an addiction she didn’t understand. “You want to get clean so bad. You know something’s killing you and you can’t stop,” said the 33-year-old who used heroin for 10 years. This spring was...
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CORRECTS TO CAPITAL, NOT CAPITOL- In this Nov. 14, 2019 photo, Jamie Cline poses for a photo behind a glass window in a door at the Olympia Bupe Clinic at the Capital Recovery Center in Olympia, Wash., which helps people addicted to heroin and other opiates get prescriptions for buprenorphine, a medicine that prevents withdrawal sickness in people trying to stop using opiates. At the clinic, a doctor is working to spread a philosophy called "medication first," which scraps requirements for counseling, abstinence or even a commitment to recovery in the battle against opioid addiction. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
December 18, 2019 - 1:57 pm
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This Dec. 12, 2019, photo shows a sign at the Mundipharma International headquarters at Cambridge Science Park in England. Mundipharma is the international affiliate of Purdue Pharma, the maker of the blockbuster painkiller OxyContin. Mundipharma is now marketing Nyxoid, a new brand of naloxone, an opioid overdose reversal medication. (AP Photo/Leila Coker)
December 15, 2019 - 10:06 pm
The gleaming white booth towered over the medical conference in Italy in October, advertising a new brand of antidote for opioid overdoses. “Be prepared. Get naloxone. Save a life,” the slogan on its walls said. Some conference attendees were stunned when they saw the company logo: Mundipharma, the...
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This Dec. 12, 2019, photo shows a sign at the Mundipharma International headquarters at Cambridge Science Park in England. Mundipharma is the international affiliate of Purdue Pharma, the maker of the blockbuster painkiller OxyContin. Mundipharma is now marketing Nyxoid, a new brand of naloxone, an opioid overdose reversal medication. (AP Photo/Leila Coker)
December 15, 2019 - 3:22 pm
The gleaming white booth towered over the medical conference in Italy in October, advertising a new brand of antidote for opioid overdoses. “Be prepared. Get naloxone. Save a life,” the slogan on its walls said. Some conference attendees were stunned when they saw the company logo: Mundipharma, the...
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This Dec. 12, 2019, photo shows a sign at the Mundipharma International headquarters at Cambridge Science Park in England. Mundipharma is the international affiliate of Purdue Pharma, the maker of the blockbuster painkiller OxyContin. Mundipharma is now marketing Nyxoid, a new brand of naloxone, an opioid overdose reversal medication. (AP Photo/Leila Coker)
December 15, 2019 - 11:54 am
The gleaming white booth towered over the medical conference in Italy in October, advertising a new brand of antidote for opioid overdoses. “Be prepared. Get naloxone. Save a life,” the slogan on its walls said. Some conference attendees were stunned when they saw the company logo: Mundipharma, the...
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This undated image provided by Dr. Andrew Kolodny shows Purdue Pharma’s international affiliate, Mundipharma, promoting Nyxoid, a new brand of opioid overdose reversal medication, at a medical conference in Italy. The photo was taken by Kolodny, a frequent critic of Purdue Pharma who has testified against the company. (Andrew Kolodny via AP)
December 15, 2019 - 12:56 am
The gleaming white booth towered over the medical conference in Italy in October, advertising a new brand of antidote for opioid overdoses. “Be prepared. Get naloxone. Save a life,” the slogan on its walls said. Some conference attendees were stunned when they saw the company logo: Mundipharma, the...
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In this Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019, photo, a recovering tramadol user waits for her medication at a de-addiction center in Kapurthala, in the northern Indian state of Punjab. The pills were everywhere, as legitimate medication sold in pharmacies, but also illicit counterfeits hawked by itinerant peddlers and street vendors. India has twice the global average of illicit opiate consumption. Researchers estimate about 4 million Indians use heroin or other opioids, and a quarter of them live in the Punjab, India's agricultural heartland bordering Pakistan. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)
December 13, 2019 - 3:23 pm
KAPURTHALA, India (AP) — Reports rolled in with escalating urgency — pills seized by the truckload, pills swallowed by schoolchildren, pills in the pockets of dead terrorists. These pills, the world has been told, are safer than the OxyContins, the Vicodins, the fentanyls that have wreaked so much...
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In this Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019, photo, a recovering tramadol user waits for her medication at a de-addiction center in Kapurthala, in the northern Indian state of Punjab. The pills were everywhere, as legitimate medication sold in pharmacies, but also illicit counterfeits hawked by itinerant peddlers and street vendors. India has twice the global average of illicit opiate consumption. Researchers estimate about 4 million Indians use heroin or other opioids, and a quarter of them live in the Punjab, India's agricultural heartland bordering Pakistan. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)
December 13, 2019 - 10:53 am
KAPURTHALA, India (AP) — Reports rolled in with escalating urgency — pills seized by the truckload, pills swallowed by schoolchildren, pills in the pockets of dead terrorists. These pills, the world has been told, are safer than the OxyContins, the Vicodins, the fentanyls that have wreaked so much...
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In this Oct. 31, 2019, photo, an Indian drug addict lies unconscious by the side of a road in Kapurthala, in the northern Indian state of Punjab. Mass abuse of the opioid tramadol spans continents, from India to Africa to the Middle East, creating international havoc some experts blame on a loophole in narcotics regulation and a miscalculation of the drug’s danger. Punjab, the center of India's opioid epidemic, was among the latest to crack down on the tramadol trade. Researchers estimate about 4 million Indians use heroin or other opioids, and a quarter of them live in the Punjab, India's agricultural heartland bordering Pakistan. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)
December 13, 2019 - 9:15 am
KAPURTHALA, India (AP) — Reports rolled in with escalating urgency — pills seized by the truckload, pills swallowed by schoolchildren, pills in the pockets of dead terrorists. These pills, the world has been told, are safer than the OxyContins, the Vicodins, the fentanyls that have wreaked so much...
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In this Oct. 31, 2019, photo, an Indian drug addict lies unconscious by the side of a road in Kapurthala, in the northern Indian state of Punjab. Mass abuse of the opioid tramadol spans continents, from India to Africa to the Middle East, creating international havoc some experts blame on a loophole in narcotics regulation and a miscalculation of the drug’s danger. Punjab, the center of India's opioid epidemic, was among the latest to crack down on the tramadol trade. Researchers estimate about 4 million Indians use heroin or other opioids, and a quarter of them live in the Punjab, India's agricultural heartland bordering Pakistan. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)
December 13, 2019 - 2:57 am
KAPURTHALA, India (AP) — Reports rolled in with escalating urgency — pills seized by the truckload, pills swallowed by schoolchildren, pills in the pockets of dead terrorists. These pills, the world has been told, are safer than the OxyContins, the Vicodins, the fentanyls that have wreaked so much...
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