Drug abuse

This undated photo provided by Garrett Hade shows shows Hade at Recovery Fest hosted by Above The Noise Foundation event. Hade, said he has been sober for nearly five years after a long odyssey through addiction that began with OxyContin when he was a teenager in Florida. As an organizer with the Recovery Advocacy Project, Hade said he's telling people that they'll be able to make claims against Purdue Pharma. (Garrett Hade via AP)
January 24, 2020 - 4:37 pm
State and local governments have been leading the legal fight against the opioid industry, seeking payouts to help them deal with the fallout from the nation's addiction crisis. Average Americans are about to get their shot. On Friday, the federal judge overseeing the bankruptcy case of Purdue...
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FILE - In this Aug. 29, 2019, file photo, members of the Coast Guard stand near seized cocaine in Los Angeles. The nation's drug addiction crisis has been morphing in a deadly new direction: more Americans struggling with meth and cocaine. Now the government will allow states to use federal money earmarked of the opioid crisis to help people addicted to those drugs as well. The change to a $1.5 billion opioid grants program was buried in a massive spending bill that Congress passed late in 2019. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson, file)
January 21, 2020 - 1:33 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Alarmed by a deadly new twist in the nation's drug addiction crisis, the government will allow states to use federal money earmarked for the opioid epidemic to help growing numbers of people struggling with meth and cocaine. The little-noticed change is buried in a massive...
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January 10, 2020 - 12:29 pm
CLEVELAND (AP) — Guardians caring for hundreds of thousands of children born addicted to opioids since 2000 should be grouped together as part of the class action lawsuit filed by local governments and others against the manufacturers, distributors and sellers of prescription pain medication,...
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In this photo taken Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019, palliative care nurse Madeleine Mukantagara, 56, left, prays with Vestine Uwizeyimana, 22, right, who has spinal degenerative disease and is taking oral liquid morphine for her pain, as she visits to check on her health at her home in the village of Bushekeli, near Kibogora, in western Rwanda. While people in rich countries are dying from overuse of prescription painkillers, people in Rwanda and other poor countries are suffering from a lack of them, but Rwanda has come up with a solution to its pain crisis - it's morphine, which costs just pennies to produce and is delivered to households across the country by public health workers. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
December 28, 2019 - 9:27 am
BUSHEKELI, Rwanda (AP) — It was something, the silence. Nothing but the puff of her breath and the scuff of her slip-on shoes as Madeleine Mukantagara walked through the fields to her first patient of the day. Piercing cries once echoed down the hill to the road below. What she carried in her bag...
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In this photo taken Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019, palliative care nurse Madeleine Mukantagara, 56, left, prays with Vestine Uwizeyimana, 22, right, who has spinal degenerative disease and is taking oral liquid morphine for her pain, as she visits to check on her health at her home in the village of Bushekeli, near Kibogora, in western Rwanda. While people in rich countries are dying from overuse of prescription painkillers, people in Rwanda and other poor countries are suffering from a lack of them, but Rwanda has come up with a solution to its pain crisis - it's morphine, which costs just pennies to produce and is delivered to households across the country by public health workers. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
December 25, 2019 - 9:06 am
BUSHEKELI, Rwanda (AP) — It was something, the silence. Nothing but the puff of her breath and the scuff of her slip-on shoes as Madeleine Mukantagara walked through the fields to her first patient of the day. Piercing cries once echoed down the hill to the road below. What she carried in her bag...
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In this photo taken Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019, palliative care nurse Madeleine Mukantagara, 56, left, prays with Vestine Uwizeyimana, 22, right, who has spinal degenerative disease and is taking oral liquid morphine for her pain, as she visits to check on her health at her home in the village of Bushekeli, near Kibogora, in western Rwanda. While people in rich countries are dying from overuse of prescription painkillers, people in Rwanda and other poor countries are suffering from a lack of them, but Rwanda has come up with a solution to its pain crisis - it's morphine, which costs just pennies to produce and is delivered to households across the country by public health workers. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
December 25, 2019 - 5:02 am
BUSHEKELI, Rwanda (AP) — It was something, the silence. Nothing but the puff of her breath and the scuff of her slip-on shoes as Madeleine Mukantagara walked through the fields to her first patient of the day. Piercing cries once echoed down the hill to the road below. What she carried in her bag...
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In this photo taken Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019, palliative care nurse Madeleine Mukantagara, 56, left, prays with Vestine Uwizeyimana, 22, right, who has spinal degenerative disease and is taking oral liquid morphine for her pain, as she visits to check on her health at her home in the village of Bushekeli, near Kibogora, in western Rwanda. While people in rich countries are dying from overuse of prescription painkillers, people in Rwanda and other poor countries are suffering from a lack of them, but Rwanda has come up with a solution to its pain crisis - it's morphine, which costs just pennies to produce and is delivered to households across the country by public health workers. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
December 25, 2019 - 2:19 am
BUSHEKELI, Rwanda (AP) — It was something, the silence. Nothing but the puff of her breath and the scuff of her slip-on shoes as Madeleine Mukantagara walked through the fields to her first patient of the day. Piercing cries once echoed down the hill to the road below. What she carried in her bag...
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In this photo taken Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019, palliative care nurse Madeleine Mukantagara, 56, left, prays with Vestine Uwizeyimana, 22, right, who has spinal degenerative disease and is taking oral liquid morphine for her pain, as she visits to check on her health at her home in the village of Bushekeli, near Kibogora, in western Rwanda. While people in rich countries are dying from overuse of prescription painkillers, people in Rwanda and other poor countries are suffering from a lack of them, but Rwanda has come up with a solution to its pain crisis - it's morphine, which costs just pennies to produce and is delivered to households across the country by public health workers. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
December 25, 2019 - 2:08 am
BUSHEKELI, Rwanda (AP) — It was something, the silence. Nothing but the puff of her breath and the scuff of her slip-on shoes as Madeleine Mukantagara walked through the fields to her first patient of the day. Piercing cries once echoed down the hill to the road below. What she carried in her bag...
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CORRECTS TO CAPITAL, NOT CAPITOL- In this Nov. 14, 2019 photo, Jamie Cline poses for a photo behind a glass window in a door at the Olympia Bupe Clinic at the Capital Recovery Center in Olympia, Wash., which helps people addicted to heroin and other opiates get prescriptions for buprenorphine, a medicine that prevents withdrawal sickness in people trying to stop using opiates. At the clinic, a doctor is working to spread a philosophy called "medication first," which scraps requirements for counseling, abstinence or even a commitment to recovery in the battle against opioid addiction. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
December 18, 2019 - 2:50 pm
OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — Every time she got out of jail, Jamie Cline started hustling again for heroin, driven by an addiction she didn’t understand. “You want to get clean so bad. You know something’s killing you and you can’t stop,” said the 33-year-old who used heroin for 10 years. This spring was...
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CORRECTS TO CAPITAL, NOT CAPITOL- In this Nov. 14, 2019 photo, Jamie Cline poses for a photo behind a glass window in a door at the Olympia Bupe Clinic at the Capital Recovery Center in Olympia, Wash., which helps people addicted to heroin and other opiates get prescriptions for buprenorphine, a medicine that prevents withdrawal sickness in people trying to stop using opiates. At the clinic, a doctor is working to spread a philosophy called "medication first," which scraps requirements for counseling, abstinence or even a commitment to recovery in the battle against opioid addiction. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
December 18, 2019 - 2:36 pm
OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — Every time she got out of jail, Jamie Cline started hustling again for heroin, driven by an addiction she didn’t understand. “You want to get clean so bad. You know something’s killing you and you can’t stop,” said the 33-year-old who used heroin for 10 years. This spring was...
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