Diagnostic imaging

In this March 23, 2017 photo provided by the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, patient Rick Karr is prepared for treatment at the facility in Toronto, Canada. Karr was the first Alzheimer's patient treated with focused ultrasound to open the blood-brain barrier. Scientists are using ultrasound waves to temporarily jiggle an opening in the brain’s protective shield, in hopes the technique one day might help drugs for Alzheimer’s, brain tumors and other diseases better reach their target. (Kevin Van Paassen/Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre via AP)
July 25, 2018 - 1:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A handful of Alzheimer's patients signed up for a bold experiment: They let scientists beam sound waves into the brain to temporarily jiggle an opening in its protective shield. The so-called blood-brain barrier prevents germs and other damaging substances from leaching in through...
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In this March 23, 2017 photo provided by the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, patient Rick Karr is prepared for treatment at the facility in Toronto, Canada. Karr was the first Alzheimer's patient treated with focused ultrasound to open the blood-brain barrier. Scientists are using ultrasound waves to temporarily jiggle an opening in the brain’s protective shield, in hopes the technique one day might help drugs for Alzheimer’s, brain tumors and other diseases better reach their target. (Kevin Van Paassen/Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre via AP)
July 25, 2018 - 1:03 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A handful of Alzheimer's patients signed up for a bold experiment: They let scientists beam sound waves into the brain to temporarily jiggle an opening in its protective shield. That shield, called the blood-brain barrier, prevents germs and other damaging substances from leaching...
Read More
In this Feb. 8, 2018, photo, Blayne Wittig, executive director of Options for Women of California, left, a center in Concord, Calif., Debbie Whittaker, nurse manager, center, and Christine Vatuone, president and CEO of Informed Choices, talk at Informed Choices, a crisis pregnancy center in Grilroy, Calif. A California law regulating anti-abortion pregnancy centers has led to a Supreme Court clash at the intersection of abortion and free speech. The centers say a law requiring them to tell pregnant clients the state has family planning and abortion care available at little or no cost violates the centers’ free speech rights. Informed Choices is what Vatuone describes as a “life-affirming” pregnancy center. Even as it advertises “free pregnancy services” and promises in signs on its door and inside to discuss all options with pregnant women, Informed Choices exists to steer women away from abortion. (AP Photo/Mark Sherman)
March 16, 2018 - 8:26 am
GILROY, Calif. (AP) — Informed Choices is what its president describes as a "life-affirming" pregnancy center on the edge of downtown Gilroy in northern California. Even as it advertises "free pregnancy services" and promises in signs on its door and inside to discuss all options with pregnant...
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In this Feb. 8, 2018, photo, Blayne Wittig, executive director of Options for Women of California, left, a center in Concord, Calif., Debbie Whittaker, nurse manager, center, and Christine Vatuone, president and CEO of Informed Choices, talk at Informed Choices, a crisis pregnancy center in Grilroy, Calif. A California law regulating anti-abortion pregnancy centers has led to a Supreme Court clash at the intersection of abortion and free speech. The centers say a law requiring them to tell pregnant clients the state has family planning and abortion care available at little or no cost violates the centers’ free speech rights. Informed Choices is what Vatuone describes as a “life-affirming” pregnancy center. Even as it advertises “free pregnancy services” and promises in signs on its door and inside to discuss all options with pregnant women, Informed Choices exists to steer women away from abortion. (AP Photo/Mark Sherman)
March 16, 2018 - 6:17 am
GILROY, Calif. (AP) — Informed Choices is what its president describes as a "life-affirming" pregnancy center on the edge of downtown Gilroy in northern California. Even as it advertises "free pregnancy services" and promises in signs on its door and inside to discuss all options with pregnant...
Read More
In this Feb. 8, 2018, photo, Blayne Wittig, executive director of Options for Women of California, left, a center in Concord, Calif., Debbie Whittaker, nurse manager, center, and Christine Vatuone, president and CEO of Informed Choices, talk at Informed Choices, a crisis pregnancy center in Grilroy, Calif. A California law regulating anti-abortion pregnancy centers has led to a Supreme Court clash at the intersection of abortion and free speech. The centers say a law requiring them to tell pregnant clients the state has family planning and abortion care available at little or no cost violates the centers’ free speech rights. Informed Choices is what Vatuone describes as a “life-affirming” pregnancy center. Even as it advertises “free pregnancy services” and promises in signs on its door and inside to discuss all options with pregnant women, Informed Choices exists to steer women away from abortion. (AP Photo/Mark Sherman)
March 16, 2018 - 1:32 am
GILROY, Calif. (AP) — Informed Choices is what its president describes as a "life-affirming" pregnancy center on the edge of downtown Gilroy in northern California. Even as it advertises "free pregnancy services" and promises in signs on its door and inside to discuss all options with pregnant...
Read More

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