Diagnosis and treatment

This image provided by Sarepta Therapeutics in December 2019 shows a box and vial of their drug Vyondys 53. On Thursday, Dec. 12, 2019, U.S. health regulators said they approved this second drug for a debilitating form of muscular dystrophy, a surprise decision after the medication was rejected for safety concerns just four months earlier. (Sarepta Therapeutics via AP)
December 13, 2019 - 4:19 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health regulators approved a second drug for a debilitating form of muscular dystrophy, a surprise decision after the medication was rejected for safety concerns just four months ago. The ruling marks the second time the Food and Drug Administration has granted preliminary...
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In this Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019, photo, a recovering tramadol user waits for her medication at a de-addiction center in Kapurthala, in the northern Indian state of Punjab. The pills were everywhere, as legitimate medication sold in pharmacies, but also illicit counterfeits hawked by itinerant peddlers and street vendors. India has twice the global average of illicit opiate consumption. Researchers estimate about 4 million Indians use heroin or other opioids, and a quarter of them live in the Punjab, India's agricultural heartland bordering Pakistan. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)
December 13, 2019 - 3:23 pm
KAPURTHALA, India (AP) — Reports rolled in with escalating urgency — pills seized by the truckload, pills swallowed by schoolchildren, pills in the pockets of dead terrorists. These pills, the world has been told, are safer than the OxyContins, the Vicodins, the fentanyls that have wreaked so much...
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This image provided by Sarepta Therapeutics in December 2019 shows a box and vial of their drug Vyondys 53. On Thursday, Dec. 12, 2019, U.S. health regulators said they approved this second drug for a debilitating form of muscular dystrophy, a surprise decision after the medication was rejected for safety concerns just four months earlier. (Sarepta Therapeutics via AP)
December 13, 2019 - 2:28 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health regulators approved a second drug for a debilitating form of muscular dystrophy, a surprise decision after the medication was rejected for safety concerns just four months ago. The ruling marks the second time the Food and Drug Administration has granted preliminary...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, May 15, 2013 file photo, NBA Commissioner David Stern takes a question from a reporter during a news conference following an NBA Board of Governors meeting in Dallas. The NBA says former Commissioner David Stern suffered a sudden brain hemorrhage Thursday, Dec. 12, 2019 and underwent emergency surgery. The league says in a statement its thoughts and prayers are with the 77-year-old Stern's family. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez, File)
December 13, 2019 - 11:55 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Former NBA Commissioner David Stern had emergency surgery after suffering a brain hemorrhage while having lunch not far from league headquarters. The league had no update on his condition Friday. The 77-year-old Stern underwent the operation at Mount Sinai St. Luke's Hospital after...
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In this Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019, photo, a recovering tramadol user waits for her medication at a de-addiction center in Kapurthala, in the northern Indian state of Punjab. The pills were everywhere, as legitimate medication sold in pharmacies, but also illicit counterfeits hawked by itinerant peddlers and street vendors. India has twice the global average of illicit opiate consumption. Researchers estimate about 4 million Indians use heroin or other opioids, and a quarter of them live in the Punjab, India's agricultural heartland bordering Pakistan. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)
December 13, 2019 - 10:53 am
KAPURTHALA, India (AP) — Reports rolled in with escalating urgency — pills seized by the truckload, pills swallowed by schoolchildren, pills in the pockets of dead terrorists. These pills, the world has been told, are safer than the OxyContins, the Vicodins, the fentanyls that have wreaked so much...
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In this Oct. 31, 2019, photo, an Indian drug addict lies unconscious by the side of a road in Kapurthala, in the northern Indian state of Punjab. Mass abuse of the opioid tramadol spans continents, from India to Africa to the Middle East, creating international havoc some experts blame on a loophole in narcotics regulation and a miscalculation of the drug’s danger. Punjab, the center of India's opioid epidemic, was among the latest to crack down on the tramadol trade. Researchers estimate about 4 million Indians use heroin or other opioids, and a quarter of them live in the Punjab, India's agricultural heartland bordering Pakistan. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)
December 13, 2019 - 9:15 am
KAPURTHALA, India (AP) — Reports rolled in with escalating urgency — pills seized by the truckload, pills swallowed by schoolchildren, pills in the pockets of dead terrorists. These pills, the world has been told, are safer than the OxyContins, the Vicodins, the fentanyls that have wreaked so much...
Read More
In this Oct. 31, 2019, photo, an Indian drug addict lies unconscious by the side of a road in Kapurthala, in the northern Indian state of Punjab. Mass abuse of the opioid tramadol spans continents, from India to Africa to the Middle East, creating international havoc some experts blame on a loophole in narcotics regulation and a miscalculation of the drug’s danger. Punjab, the center of India's opioid epidemic, was among the latest to crack down on the tramadol trade. Researchers estimate about 4 million Indians use heroin or other opioids, and a quarter of them live in the Punjab, India's agricultural heartland bordering Pakistan. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)
December 13, 2019 - 2:57 am
KAPURTHALA, India (AP) — Reports rolled in with escalating urgency — pills seized by the truckload, pills swallowed by schoolchildren, pills in the pockets of dead terrorists. These pills, the world has been told, are safer than the OxyContins, the Vicodins, the fentanyls that have wreaked so much...
Read More
FILE - In this Wednesday, May 15, 2013 file photo, NBA Commissioner David Stern takes a question from a reporter during a news conference following an NBA Board of Governors meeting in Dallas. The NBA says former Commissioner David Stern suffered a sudden brain hemorrhage Thursday, Dec. 12, 2019 and underwent emergency surgery. The league says in a statement its thoughts and prayers are with the 77-year-old Stern's family. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez, File)
December 12, 2019 - 11:08 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The NBA said former Commissioner David Stern suffered a sudden brain hemorrhage Thursday and had emergency surgery. The league said in a statement its thoughts and prayers are with the 77-year-old Stern's family. Stern served exactly 30 years as the NBA's longest-tenured...
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Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., speaks during her weekly news conference on Capitol Hill, Thursday, Dec. 12, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
December 12, 2019 - 3:22 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Sharpening their 2020 election message, House Democrats on Thursday pushed through legislation that would empower Medicare to negotiate prescription drug prices and offer new benefits for seniors. The vote along party lines was 230-192. Speaker Nancy Pelosi's bill would cap...
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This undated photo provided by Texas Right to Life shows Tinslee Lewis. A new judge will consider whether a Texas hospital can take the 10-month-old girl off life support despite her family's opposition after the impartiality of the previous judge was questioned. A temporary restraining order stopping Cook Children's Medical Center from removing life-sustaining treatment for Tinslee Lewis was set to expire Tuesday, Dec. 10, 2019. But after the removal last week of Tarrant County Juvenile Court Judge Alex Kim, a new hearing on the family's request for a temporary injunction is now set for Thursday in Fort Worth. (Courtesy of Texas Right to Life via AP)
December 12, 2019 - 2:53 pm
FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — The mother of a 10-month-old girl on life support testified Thursday that her daughter is “sassy” and enjoys cartoons, as a Texas judge considered whether a Fort Worth hospital can remove life-sustaining treatment because doctors say the infant's condition will never...
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