Diagnosis and treatment

President Donald Trump gestures to people cheering him across the tarmac as he, arrives on Air Force One with first lady Melania Trump and their son Barron Trump at Palm Beach International Airport, in West Palm Beach, Fla., Friday, March 23, 2018. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
March 23, 2018 - 10:47 pm
PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) — President Donald Trump released an order Friday night banning most transgender troops from serving in the military except under "limited circumstances," following up on his calls last year to ban transgender individuals from serving. The White House said retaining troops...
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FILE - This Oct. 14, 2015, file photo shows the Food and Drug Administration campus in Silver Spring, Md. The FDA receives about 1,000 requests to use experimental drugs for “compassionate use” each year and approves more than 99 percent of them, according to agency figures. The process usually takes about four days, although in emergency cases regulators can grant permission immediately over the phone. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
March 22, 2018 - 1:14 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The idea is a political crowd-pleaser with a catchy slogan: giving desperately ill patients the "right to try" experimental medicines. Lawmakers in the U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday became the latest group of politicians to back the effort, sending a bill to the...
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In this Feb. 8, 2018, photo, Blayne Wittig, executive director of Options for Women of California, left, a center in Concord, Calif., Debbie Whittaker, nurse manager, center, and Christine Vatuone, president and CEO of Informed Choices, talk at Informed Choices, a crisis pregnancy center in Grilroy, Calif. A California law regulating anti-abortion pregnancy centers has led to a Supreme Court clash at the intersection of abortion and free speech. The centers say a law requiring them to tell pregnant clients the state has family planning and abortion care available at little or no cost violates the centers’ free speech rights. Informed Choices is what Vatuone describes as a “life-affirming” pregnancy center. Even as it advertises “free pregnancy services” and promises in signs on its door and inside to discuss all options with pregnant women, Informed Choices exists to steer women away from abortion. (AP Photo/Mark Sherman)
March 16, 2018 - 8:26 am
GILROY, Calif. (AP) — Informed Choices is what its president describes as a "life-affirming" pregnancy center on the edge of downtown Gilroy in northern California. Even as it advertises "free pregnancy services" and promises in signs on its door and inside to discuss all options with pregnant...
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In this Feb. 8, 2018, photo, Blayne Wittig, executive director of Options for Women of California, left, a center in Concord, Calif., Debbie Whittaker, nurse manager, center, and Christine Vatuone, president and CEO of Informed Choices, talk at Informed Choices, a crisis pregnancy center in Grilroy, Calif. A California law regulating anti-abortion pregnancy centers has led to a Supreme Court clash at the intersection of abortion and free speech. The centers say a law requiring them to tell pregnant clients the state has family planning and abortion care available at little or no cost violates the centers’ free speech rights. Informed Choices is what Vatuone describes as a “life-affirming” pregnancy center. Even as it advertises “free pregnancy services” and promises in signs on its door and inside to discuss all options with pregnant women, Informed Choices exists to steer women away from abortion. (AP Photo/Mark Sherman)
March 16, 2018 - 6:17 am
GILROY, Calif. (AP) — Informed Choices is what its president describes as a "life-affirming" pregnancy center on the edge of downtown Gilroy in northern California. Even as it advertises "free pregnancy services" and promises in signs on its door and inside to discuss all options with pregnant...
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In this Feb. 8, 2018, photo, Blayne Wittig, executive director of Options for Women of California, left, a center in Concord, Calif., Debbie Whittaker, nurse manager, center, and Christine Vatuone, president and CEO of Informed Choices, talk at Informed Choices, a crisis pregnancy center in Grilroy, Calif. A California law regulating anti-abortion pregnancy centers has led to a Supreme Court clash at the intersection of abortion and free speech. The centers say a law requiring them to tell pregnant clients the state has family planning and abortion care available at little or no cost violates the centers’ free speech rights. Informed Choices is what Vatuone describes as a “life-affirming” pregnancy center. Even as it advertises “free pregnancy services” and promises in signs on its door and inside to discuss all options with pregnant women, Informed Choices exists to steer women away from abortion. (AP Photo/Mark Sherman)
March 16, 2018 - 1:32 am
GILROY, Calif. (AP) — Informed Choices is what its president describes as a "life-affirming" pregnancy center on the edge of downtown Gilroy in northern California. Even as it advertises "free pregnancy services" and promises in signs on its door and inside to discuss all options with pregnant...
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March 14, 2018 - 9:57 pm
ROME (AP) — Chinese health authorities told a Vatican trafficking conference that Beijing's efforts to crack down on illegal "underground" organ transplants have resulted in 220 arrests and 100 victims being rescued over the past 10 years. Dr. Haibo Wang, deputy chief of China's organ donation and...
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March 14, 2018 - 5:17 pm
ROME (AP) — Chinese health authorities have told a Vatican trafficking conference that Beijing's efforts to crack down on illegal "underground" organ transplants have resulted in 220 arrests and 100 victims being rescued over the past 10 years. Dr. Haibo Wang, deputy chief of China's organ donation...
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FILE- In this Nov. 2, 2015, file photo, Elizabeth Holmes, founder and CEO of Theranos, speaks at the Fortune Global Forum in San Francisco. On Wednesday, March 14, 2018, the Securities and Exchange Commission filed charges against Holmes and her company for defrauding investors. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
March 14, 2018 - 4:13 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Elizabeth Holmes, a Stanford University dropout once billed as the "next Steve Jobs," has forfeited control of Theranos, the blood-testing startup she founded, and will pay $500,000 to settle charges that she oversaw a "massive fraud." Under an agreement with the Securities and...
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FILE- In this Nov. 2, 2015, file photo, Elizabeth Holmes, founder and CEO of Theranos, speaks at the Fortune Global Forum in San Francisco. On Wednesday, March 14, 2018, the Securities and Exchange Commission filed charges against Holmes and her company for defrauding investors. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
March 14, 2018 - 2:11 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Elizabeth Holmes, a Stanford University dropout once billed as the "next Steve Jobs" has forfeited control Theranos, the blood testing startup she founded, and will pay $500,000 to settle charges that she oversaw a "massive fraud." Under an agreement with the Securities and Exchange...
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FILE- In this Nov. 2, 2015, file photo, Elizabeth Holmes, founder and CEO of Theranos, speaks at the Fortune Global Forum in San Francisco. On Wednesday, March 14, 2018, the Securities and Exchange Commission filed charges against Holmes and her company for defrauding investors. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
March 14, 2018 - 1:57 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Elizabeth Holmes, a Stanford University dropout once billed as the "next Steve Jobs" has forfeited control Theranos, the blood testing startup she founded, and will pay $500,000 to settle charges that she oversaw a "massive fraud." Under an agreement with the Securities and Exchange...
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