Developmental disorders

April 01, 2019 - 11:08 am
PARIS (AP) — The French government has outlined measures to ensure early diagnostic testing for young children with autism and help for them going to school. In a statement following a Cabinet meeting Monday, the government promised that expenses linked to diagnostic testing will be fully...
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Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell squirts liquid onto Joe Ingles, seated, following the team's NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers on Wednesday, March 27, 2019, in Salt Lake City. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
March 28, 2019 - 2:43 am
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Before the game even started, Joe Ingles was exhausted. Shooting videos with son Jacob, emotional meetings with other families affected by autism and generally doing all he could to promote Autism Awareness Night was almost too much. "I told the guys before the game, I really...
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Education Secretary Betsy DeVos arrives for a House Appropriations subcommittee hearing on budget on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 26, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
March 27, 2019 - 9:22 pm
Education Secretary Betsy DeVos on Wednesday defended a proposal to eliminate funding for the Special Olympics, pushing back against a storm of criticism from athletes, celebrities and politicians who rallied to support the organization. DeVos became a target on social media after Democrats slammed...
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Ethan Lindenberger testifies during a Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 5, 2019, to examine vaccines, focusing on preventable disease outbreaks. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
March 05, 2019 - 9:00 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — An Ohio teen defied his mother's anti-vaccine beliefs and started getting his shots when he turned 18 — and told Congress on Tuesday that it's crucial to counter fraudulent claims on social media that scare parents. Ethan Lindenberger of Norwalk, Ohio, said his mother's "love,...
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FILE - In this Oct. 18, 2018 file photo, the U.S. Supreme Court is seen at near sunset in Washington, Thursday. The Supreme Court is ending a long legal fight by ruling that a Texas death row inmate is intellectually disabled and thus may not be executed. The justices ruled 6-3 Tuesday in the case of inmate Bobby James Moore.(AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
February 19, 2019 - 11:22 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is ending a long legal fight by ruling that a Texas death row inmate is intellectually disabled and thus may not be executed. The justices ruled 6-3 on Tuesday in the case of inmate Bobby James Moore. Moore had been sentenced to death for the 1980 shotgun slaying...
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February 19, 2019 - 9:59 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is ending a long legal fight by ruling that a Texas death row inmate is intellectually disabled and thus may not be executed. The justices ruled 6-3 Tuesday in the case of inmate Bobby James Moore. Moore had been sentenced to death for the 1980 shotgun slaying of...
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FILE - In this Feb. 5, 2019, file pool photo, Nathan Sutherland, accused of raping and impregnating a patient at Hacienda HealthCare, is arraigned in Maricopa County Superior Court in Phoenix, Ariz. The rape of an incapacitated woman at this facility is driving Arizona to catch up to 10 states with laws or regulations governing electronic monitoring and other technology aimed at deterring abuse inside long-term care facilities. Renewed attention on safeguarding vulnerable residents at care centers comes after an incapacitated woman gave birth at the Phoenix facility in Dec. 2018. (Tom Tingle/The Arizona Republic via AP, Pool, File)
February 08, 2019 - 9:17 am
PHOENIX (AP) — Arizona is trying to catch up to 10 states with laws allowing electronic monitoring and other technology aimed at deterring abuse of vulnerable people at long-term care facilities following the rape of an incapacitated Phoenix woman who later gave birth. Cameras are most commonly...
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FILE - In this Feb. 5, 2019, file pool photo, Nathan Sutherland, accused of raping and impregnating a patient at Hacienda HealthCare, is arraigned in Maricopa County Superior Court in Phoenix, Ariz. The rape of an incapacitated woman at this facility is driving Arizona to catch up to 10 states with laws or regulations governing electronic monitoring and other technology aimed at deterring abuse inside long-term care facilities. Renewed attention on safeguarding vulnerable residents at care centers comes after an incapacitated woman gave birth at the Phoenix facility in Dec. 2018. (Tom Tingle/The Arizona Republic via AP, Pool, File)
February 08, 2019 - 1:16 am
PHOENIX (AP) — Arizona is trying to catch up to 10 states with laws allowing electronic monitoring and other technology that aim to deter abuse of vulnerable people at long-term care facilities following the rape of an incapacitated Phoenix woman who later gave birth. Cameras are most commonly used...
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FILE - This Friday, Jan. 4, 2019, file photo shows Hacienda HealthCare in Phoenix. State regulators reportedly wanted to remove developmentally disabled patients from a Phoenix long-term care facility years before a woman in a vegetative state gave birth. The Arizona Republic reported Sunday, Jan. 13, 2019, that Hacienda HealthCare faced a criminal investigation in 2016. The facility allegedly billed the state some $4 million in bogus 2014 charges for wages, transportation, housekeeping, maintenance and supplies. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
January 13, 2019 - 3:16 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — Regulators wanted to remove developmentally disabled patients from a Phoenix long-term care facility years before a woman in a vegetative state gave birth, Arizona's largest newspaper reported Sunday. The Arizona Republic reported Hacienda HealthCare faced a 2016 criminal...
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FILE - This Friday, Jan. 4, 2019, file photo shows Hacienda HealthCare in Phoenix. State regulators reportedly wanted to remove developmentally disabled patients from a Phoenix long-term care facility years before a woman in a vegetative state gave birth. The Arizona Republic reported Sunday, Jan. 13, 2019, that Hacienda HealthCare faced a criminal investigation in 2016. The facility allegedly billed the state some $4 million in bogus 2014 charges for wages, transportation, housekeeping, maintenance and supplies. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
January 13, 2019 - 2:56 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — Regulators wanted to remove developmentally disabled patients from a Phoenix long-term care facility years before a woman in a vegetative state gave birth, Arizona's largest newspaper reported Sunday. The Arizona Republic reported Hacienda HealthCare faced a 2016 criminal...
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