Courts

In this April 9, 2019, photo, Argus Leader investigative reporter Jonathan Ellis and news director Cory Myers in the newsroom in Sioux Falls, S.D. In 2010, reporters at South Dakota’s Argus Leader newspaper came up with the idea of requesting data about the government’s food assistance program. They thought the information about the $65-billion dollar-a year program, previously known as food stamps, could lead to a series of stories and help them identify possible fraud. But the government didn’t provide everything the paper wanted. Trying to get the data has taken the paper more than eight years and landed the case at the Supreme Court. (Briana Sanchez/The Argus Leader via AP)
April 20, 2019 - 4:13 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — In the summer of 2010, reporters at South Dakota's Argus Leader newspaper decided to request data about the government's food assistance program, previously known as food stamps. They thought the information could lead to a series of stories and potentially help them identify...
Read More
In this April 9, 2019, photo, Argus Leader investigative reporter Jonathan Ellis and news director Cory Myers in the newsroom in Sioux Falls, S.D. In 2010, reporters at South Dakota’s Argus Leader newspaper came up with the idea of requesting data about the government’s food assistance program. They thought the information about the $65-billion dollar-a year program, previously known as food stamps, could lead to a series of stories and help them identify possible fraud. But the government didn’t provide everything the paper wanted. Trying to get the data has taken the paper more than eight years and landed the case at the Supreme Court. (Briana Sanchez/The Argus Leader via AP)
April 20, 2019 - 8:12 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — In the summer of 2010, reporters at South Dakota's Argus Leader newspaper decided to request data about the government's food assistance program, previously known as food stamps. They thought the information could lead to a series of stories and potentially help them identify...
Read More
In this April 9, 2019, photo, Argus Leader investigative reporter Jonathan Ellis and news director Cory Myers in the newsroom in Sioux Falls, S.D. In 2010, reporters at South Dakota’s Argus Leader newspaper came up with the idea of requesting data about the government’s food assistance program. They thought the information about the $65-billion dollar-a year program, previously known as food stamps, could lead to a series of stories and help them identify possible fraud. But the government didn’t provide everything the paper wanted. Trying to get the data has taken the paper more than eight years and landed the case at the Supreme Court. (Briana Sanchez/The Argus Leader via AP)
April 20, 2019 - 8:11 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — In the summer of 2010, reporters at South Dakota's Argus Leader newspaper came up with the idea of requesting data about the government's food assistance program. They thought the information about the $65-billion dollar-a year program, previously known as food stamps, could lead...
Read More
FILE - In this April 4, 2013, file photo, a mechanized shovel loads a haul truck with coal at the Spring Creek coal mine near Decker, Mont. A federal judge in Montana says the Trump administration failed to consider the environmental effects of resuming coal sales from federal lands, but stopped short of halting future sales. U.S. District Judge Brian Morris on Friday, April 19, 2019, ordered government attorneys to enter negotiations with states and environmental groups that had sued to stop the lease sales. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)
April 19, 2019 - 10:41 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A federal judge on Friday ruled that the Trump administration failed to consider potential damage to the environment from its decision to resume coal sales from U.S. lands, but the court stopped short of halting future sales. U.S. District Judge Brian Morris in Montana said...
Read More
FILE - In this April 4, 2013, file photo, a mechanized shovel loads a haul truck with coal at the Spring Creek coal mine near Decker, Mont. A federal judge in Montana says the Trump administration failed to consider the environmental effects of resuming coal sales from federal lands, but stopped short of halting future sales. U.S. District Judge Brian Morris on Friday, April 19, 2019, ordered government attorneys to enter negotiations with states and environmental groups that had sued to stop the lease sales. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)
April 19, 2019 - 7:39 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A federal judge on Friday ruled that the Trump administration failed to consider potential damage to the environment from its decision to resume coal sales from U.S. lands, but the court stopped short of halting future sales. U.S. District Judge Brian Morris in Montana said...
Read More
FILE - In this April 4, 2013, file photo, a mechanized shovel loads a haul truck with coal at the Spring Creek coal mine near Decker, Mont. A federal judge in Montana says the Trump administration failed to consider the environmental effects of resuming coal sales from federal lands, but stopped short of halting future sales. U.S. District Judge Brian Morris on Friday, April 19, 2019, ordered government attorneys to enter negotiations with states and environmental groups that had sued to stop the lease sales. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)
April 19, 2019 - 7:16 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A federal judge on Friday ruled that the Trump administration failed to consider potential damage to the environment from its decision to resume coal sales from federal lands, but stopped short of halting future sales. U.S. District Judge Brian Morris in Montana said U.S...
Read More
April 19, 2019 - 7:11 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A federal judge on Friday ruled that the Trump administration failed to consider potential damage to the environment from its decision to resume coal sales from federal lands, but stopped short of halting future sales. U.S. District Judge Brian Morris in Montana said U.S...
Read More
April 19, 2019 - 6:38 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A federal judge says the Trump administration failed to consider the environmental effects of its decision to resume coal sales from federal lands, but stopped short of halting future sales. U.S. District Judge Brian Morris in Montana on Friday ordered government attorneys to...
Read More
Former vice president Joe Biden talks with officials after speaking at a rally in support of striking Stop & Shop workers in Boston, Thursday, April 18, 2019. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)
April 19, 2019 - 6:11 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Former Vice President Joe Biden is expected to join the crowded 2020 Democratic presidential field next week. The decision answers one of the most significant outstanding questions of the early presidential primary season, which has already seen announcements from 18 other...
Read More
Former vice president Joe Biden talks with officials after speaking at a rally in support of striking Stop & Shop workers in Boston, Thursday, April 18, 2019. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)
April 19, 2019 - 1:25 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Former Vice President Joe Biden is expected to join the crowded 2020 Democratic presidential race next week. The decision answers one of the most significant outstanding questions of the early presidential primary season, which has already seen announcements from 18 high-profile...
Read More

Pages