Cosmology

This combination photo shows a cover image released by DC Comics of "Flash Facts" by Mayim Bialik, left, and Mayim Bialik as she speaks at AT&T's SHAPE: "The Scully Effect is Real" panel on June 22, 2019, in Burbank, Calif. "Big Bang Theory" actress Bialik is teaming with DC Entertainment on a project that joins superhero power to the power of science. (Derek Charm/DC Comics via AP, left, and AP Photo)
June 25, 2020 - 9:58 am
NEW YORK (AP) — “The Big Bang Theory” actor Mayim Bialik is teaming with DC Entertainment on a project that joins superhero power to the power of science. DC Entertainment announced Thursday that Bialik will collaborate with popular comic writers and illustrators on a story collection that features...
Read More
This image made available by NASA on Thursday, Feb. 27, 2020 shows the Ophiuchus galaxy cluster viewed in a composite of X-ray, radio and infrared data. The inset image at bottom right shows data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory which confirmed a cavity formed by a record-breaking explosion from a super-massive black hole. The explosion was so large it carved out a crater in the hot gas that could hold 15 Milky Ways, said lead author Simona Giacintucci of the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington. (Chandra: NASA/CXC/NRL/S. Giacintucci, et al., XMM: ESA/XMM; Radio: NCRA/TIFR/GMRT; Infrared: 2MASS/UMass/IPAC-Caltech/NASA/NSF via AP)
February 27, 2020 - 3:24 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Astronomers have discovered the biggest explosion seen in the universe, originating from a super-massive black hole. Scientists reported Thursday that the blast came from a black hole in a cluster of galaxies 390 million light-years away. The explosion was so large it...
Read More
February 27, 2020 - 1:40 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Astronomers have discovered the biggest explosion seen in the universe, originating from a super-massive black hole. Scientists reported Thursday that the blast came from a black hole in a cluster of galaxies 390 million light-years away. The explosion was so large it...
Read More
This image released by HBO shows Maisie Williams as Arya Stark in a scene from "Game of Thrones." It was neither Jon Snow nor Daenerys who won the climactic Battle of Winterfell on “Game of Thrones.” It was Arya Stark, who bravely launched herself at The Night King and stabbed the White Walker leader, ending his reign of terror and turning the Army of the Dead into frozen dust. (Helen Sloan/HBO via AP)
December 10, 2019 - 2:36 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Many have noticed how fragmented our TV viewing is, with multiple competing streaming services and dozens of channels pulling us in different directions. But the year also saw some jaw-dropping moments that found huge audiences, whether it was a royal interview or a viral alien. The...
Read More
This image released by HBO shows Maisie Williams as Arya Stark in a scene from "Game of Thrones." It was neither Jon Snow nor Daenerys who won the climactic Battle of Winterfell on “Game of Thrones.” It was Arya Stark, who bravely launched herself at The Night King and stabbed the White Walker leader, ending his reign of terror and turning the Army of the Dead into frozen dust. (Helen Sloan/HBO via AP)
December 10, 2019 - 10:12 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Many have noticed how fragmented our TV viewing is, with multiple competing streaming services and dozens of channels pulling us in different directions. But the year also saw some jaw-dropping moments that found huge audiences, whether it was a royal interview or a viral alien. The...
Read More
This combination of Oct. 8, 2019, photos shows the Nobel Prize winners in Physics, from left, James Peebles in Princeton, N.J., Didier Queloz in London and Michel Mayor in Madrid. Peebles, an emeritus professor at Princeton University, won for his theoretical discoveries in cosmology. Swiss star-gazers Mayor, and Queloz, both of the University of Geneva, were honored for finding an exoplanet — a planet outside our solar system — that orbits a sun-like star, the Nobel committee said. (AP Photo)
October 08, 2019 - 1:12 pm
STOCKHOLM (AP) — A Canadian American cosmologist and two Swiss scientists won this year's Nobel Prize in Physics on Tuesday for exploring the evolution of the universe and discovering a new kind of planet, with implications for that nagging question: Does life exist only on Earth? Canadian-born...
Read More
This combination of Oct. 8, 2019, photos shows the Nobel Prize winners in Physics, from left, James Peebles in Princeton, N.J., Didier Queloz in London and Michel Mayor in Madrid. Peebles, an emeritus professor at Princeton University, won for his theoretical discoveries in cosmology. Swiss star-gazers Mayor, and Queloz, both of the University of Geneva, were honored for finding an exoplanet — a planet outside our solar system — that orbits a sun-like star, the Nobel committee said. (AP Photo)
October 08, 2019 - 12:40 pm
STOCKHOLM (AP) — A Canadian-American cosmologist and two Swiss scientists won this year's Nobel Prize in Physics on Tuesday for exploring the evolution of the universe and discovering a new kind of planet, with implications for that nagging question: Does life exist only on Earth? Canadian-born...
Read More
Professor of Physics at the Cavendish Laboratory and Geneva University Didier Queloz poses for photographers at the Science Media Centre in London, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019. Queloz from the University of Cambridge has been jointly awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics along with Professor James Peebles and Professor Michel Mayor for their pioneering advances in physical cosmology, and the discovery of an exoplanet orbiting a solar-type star. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
October 08, 2019 - 11:26 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — A Canadian-American cosmologist and two Swiss scientists won this year's Nobel Prize in Physics on Tuesday for exploring the evolution of the universe and discovering a new kind of planet, with implications for that nagging question: Does life exist only on Earth? Canadian-born...
Read More
A screen displays the portraits of the laureates of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics, with left to right, James Peebles, Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz, during a news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on Tuesday Oct. 8, 2019. (Claudio Bresciani / TT via AP)
October 08, 2019 - 10:18 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — A Canadian-American cosmologist and two Swiss scientists won this year's Nobel Prize in Physics on Tuesday for exploring the evolution of the universe and discovering a new kind of planet, with implications for that nagging question: Does life exist only on Earth? Canadian-born...
Read More
Ulf Danielsson, member of the Nobel committee talks during the announcement of the winners of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics during news conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on Tuesday Oct. 8, 2019. The 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics is awarded to James Peebles, Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz. (Claudio Bresciani / TT via AP)
October 08, 2019 - 9:35 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — The Latest on the Nobel Prize in Physics (all times local): 3:15 p.m. Princeton University cosmologist James Peebles says he answered a 5:30 a.m. phone call on Tuesday thinking "it's either something very wonderful or it's something horrible." His fear quickly gave way to...
Read More

Pages