Corporate investigations

FILE - In this Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2019, file photo, Recording Academy President/CEO Deborah Dugan participates in the 62nd Grammy Awards nominations news conference at Studio 43 at CBS Broadcast Center in New York. The Recording Academy says it has fired Deborah Dugan, its former president who called into question the integrity of the Grammy Awards nominations process. The academy said Monday the decision was reached after “two exhaustive, costly independent investigations” about Dugan and her allegations. It said the reviews found “consistent management deficiencies and failures,” though no specifics were offered. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP, File)
March 02, 2020 - 5:59 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — The Recording Academy on Monday fired Deborah Dugan, its former president who called into question the integrity of the Grammy Awards nominations process and said she was sexually harassed by a top lawyer for the organization, which she called a boys' club that coddled and...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2019, file photo, Recording Academy President/CEO Deborah Dugan participates in the 62nd Grammy Awards nominations news conference at Studio 43 at CBS Broadcast Center in New York. The Recording Academy says it has fired Deborah Dugan, its former president who called into question the integrity of the Grammy Awards nominations process. The academy said Monday the decision was reached after “two exhaustive, costly independent investigations” about Dugan and her allegations. It said the reviews found “consistent management deficiencies and failures,” though no specifics were offered. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP, File)
March 02, 2020 - 5:14 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — The Recording Academy on Monday fired Deborah Dugan, its former president who called into question the integrity of the Grammy Awards nominations process and said she was sexually harassed by a top lawyer for the organization, which she called a boys' club that coddled and...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2019, file photo, Recording Academy President/CEO Deborah Dugan participates in the 62nd Grammy Awards nominations news conference at Studio 43 at CBS Broadcast Center in New York. The Recording Academy says it has fired Deborah Dugan, its former president who called into question the integrity of the Grammy Awards nominations process. The academy said Monday the decision was reached after “two exhaustive, costly independent investigations” about Dugan and her allegations. It said the reviews found “consistent management deficiencies and failures,” though no specifics were offered. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP, File)
March 02, 2020 - 4:13 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — The Recording Academy on Monday fired Deborah Dugan, its former president who called into question the integrity of the Grammy Awards nominations process and said she was sexually harassed by a top lawyer for the organization, which she called a boys' club that coddled and...
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February 22, 2020 - 12:18 pm
WEST HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — An investigation has revealed multiple credible allegations of sexual and physical abuse by former faculty and staff spanning decades at a school for deaf children in Connecticut, school officials said Friday. The American School for the Deaf in West Hartford released...
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FILE- In an undated photo provided by the Bentley Historical Library at the University of Michigan, Dr. Robert E. Anderson is shown. The president of the University of Michigan has apologized to "anyone who was harmed" by Anderson, a late doctor after several former students said he molested them during medical exams at the school. One man said Thursday, Feb. 20, 2020, that Dr. Anderson molested him during a medical exam in 1968 or 1969. Police started investigating the onetime director of the University Health Service and physician for the football team in July 2018 after a former student athlete alleged abuse by Anderson in the 1970s. Anderson died in 2008. (Robert Kalmbach/Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan via AP)
February 21, 2020 - 6:13 pm
ANN ARBOR, Michigan (AP) — A former University of Michigan student who reported in 2018 that a doctor at the school had molested him during medical exams decades ago says he complained at the time to his wrestling coach and the school's athletic director about the sexual abuse, according to...
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FILE- In an undated photo provided by the Bentley Historical Library at the University of Michigan, Dr. Robert E. Anderson is shown. The president of the University of Michigan has apologized to "anyone who was harmed" by Anderson, a late doctor after several former students said he molested them during medical exams at the school. One man said Thursday, Feb. 20, 2020, that Dr. Anderson molested him during a medical exam in 1968 or 1969. Police started investigating the onetime director of the University Health Service and physician for the football team in July 2018 after a former student athlete alleged abuse by Anderson in the 1970s. Anderson died in 2008. (Robert Kalmbach/Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan via AP)
February 21, 2020 - 6:02 pm
ANN ARBOR, Michigan (AP) — A former University of Michigan student who reported in 2018 that a doctor at the school had molested him during medical exams decades ago says he complained at the time to his wrestling coach and the school's athletic director about the sexual abuse, according to...
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Nicola T. Hanna, U.S. Attorney for the Central District of California, at podium, announces at a news conference in Los Angeles Friday, Feb. 21, 2020, that Wells Fargo has agreed to pay $3 billion to settle criminal and civil investigations into a long-running practice whereby company employees opened millions of unauthorized bank accounts in order to meet unrealistic sales goals. (AP Photo/Stefanie Dazio)
February 21, 2020 - 5:53 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Wells Fargo agreed Friday to pay $3 billion to settle criminal and civil investigations into a long-running practice whereby company employees opened millions of unauthorized bank accounts in order to meet unrealistic sales goals. Since the fake-accounts scandal came to light in...
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Nicola T. Hanna, U.S. Attorney for the Central District of California, at podium, announces at a news conference in Los Angeles Friday, Feb. 21, 2020, that Wells Fargo has agreed to pay $3 billion to settle criminal and civil investigations into a long-running practice whereby company employees opened millions of unauthorized bank accounts in order to meet unrealistic sales goals. (AP Photo/Stefanie Dazio)
February 21, 2020 - 5:39 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Wells Fargo agreed Friday to pay $3 billion to settle criminal and civil investigations into a long-running practice whereby company employees opened millions of unauthorized bank accounts in order to meet unrealistic sales goals. Since the fake-accounts scandal came to light in...
Read More
Nicola T. Hanna, U.S. Attorney for the Central District of California, at podium, announces at a news conference in Los Angeles Friday, Feb. 21, 2020, that Wells Fargo has agreed to pay $3 billion to settle criminal and civil investigations into a long-running practice whereby company employees opened millions of unauthorized bank accounts in order to meet unrealistic sales goals. (AP Photo/Stefanie Dazio)
February 21, 2020 - 5:01 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Wells Fargo agreed Friday to pay $3 billion to settle criminal and civil investigations into a long-running practice whereby company employees opened millions of unauthorized bank accounts in order to meet unrealistic sales goals. Since the fake-accounts scandal came to light in...
Read More
February 21, 2020 - 4:28 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Wells Fargo agreed Friday to pay $3 billion to settle criminal and civil investigations into a long-running practice whereby company employees opened millions of unauthorized bank accounts in order to meet unrealistic sales goals. Since the fake-accounts scandal came to light in...
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