Consumer products and services

John Kirk, right, a 20-year-employee, pickets with co-workers outside the General Motors Fabrication Division, Friday, Oct. 4, 2019, in Parma, Ohio. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)
October 06, 2019 - 1:01 pm
DETROIT (AP) — The top negotiator in contract talks between General Motors and the United Auto Workers says bargaining has hit a big snag. In an email to union members, UAW Vice President Terry Dittes (DIT-ez) casts doubt on whether there will be a settlement soon in a dispute that's led to a 21-...
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John Kirk, right, a 20-year-employee, pickets with co-workers outside the General Motors Fabrication Division, Friday, Oct. 4, 2019, in Parma, Ohio. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)
October 06, 2019 - 12:35 pm
DETROIT (AP) — The top negotiator in contract talks between General Motors and the United Auto Workers says bargaining has hit a big snag. In an email to union members, UAW Vice President Terry Dittes (DIT-ez) casts doubt on whether there will be a settlement soon in a contract dispute that has led...
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FILE - In this Feb. 20, 2014, file photo, a patron exhales vapor from an e-cigarette at a store in New York. Only two years ago e-cigarettes were viewed as holding great potential for public health: offering a way to wean smokers off traditional cigarettes. But now Juul and other vaping companies face an escalating backlash that threatens to sweep their products off the market. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File)
October 05, 2019 - 11:36 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Only two years ago, electronic cigarettes were viewed as a small industry with big potential to improve public health by offering a path to steer millions of smokers away from deadly cigarettes. That promise led U.S. regulators to take a hands-off approach to e-cigarette makers,...
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FILE - In this Feb. 20, 2014, file photo, a patron exhales vapor from an e-cigarette at a store in New York. Only two years ago e-cigarettes were viewed as holding great potential for public health: offering a way to wean smokers off traditional cigarettes. But now Juul and other vaping companies face an escalating backlash that threatens to sweep their products off the market. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File)
October 05, 2019 - 11:26 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Experts say the recent clampdown on electronic cigarettes could have unintended consequences, including pushing adult users back to traditional cigarettes. Only two years ago, e-cigarettes were a small industry viewed as holding great promise for improving public health by weaning...
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Wheels of parmesan cheese are on sale with spirits in a deli in Rome, Thursday, Oct. 3, 2019. The U.S. had prepared for Wednesday's ruling and already drawn up lists of the dozens of goods it would put tariffs on. They include EU cheeses, olives, and whiskey, as well as planes, helicopters and aircraft parts in the case _ though the decision is likely to require fine-tuning of that list if the Trump administration agrees to go for the tariffs. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)
October 04, 2019 - 1:35 pm
CÓRDOBA, Spain (AP) — Olives are harvested the old-fashioned way on Juan Luque's farm in southern Spain, as men thrash the gnarly tree limbs with poles, raining the small green fruit into the motorized collector waiting underneath. But for Luque and thousands of other farmers scattered across...
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In this Monday, Sept. 23, 2019 photo released by Northwest Metro Drug Task Force/Minnesota Departments of Public Safety shows "Dank" packaging, part of the 75,000 THC vaping cartridges seized in a record drug bust in Anoka County, Minn. Dank, a shadowy but widely sold illegal marijuana vape is drawing the attention of investigators looking into a rash of mysterious lung illnesses around the U.S. Investigators haven't identified a culprit in the outbreak but say many patients have mentioned using Dank vapes. (Northwest Metro Drug Task Force/Minnesota Departments of Public Safety via AP)
October 04, 2019 - 1:34 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — It's a widely known vaping cartridge in the marijuana economy, but it's not a licensed brand. And it's got the kind of market buzz no legitimate company would want. The vaping cartridges that go by the catchy, one-syllable name "Dank" — a slang word for highly potent cannabis —...
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FILE - This Jan. 31, 2019, file photo, shows the logo of Samsung Electronics Co. at its shop in Seoul, South Korea. Samsung said in an emailed statement Friday, Oct. 4, 2019, that it "has arrived at the difficult decision to cease operations of Samsung Electronics Huizhou" in China in late September. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man, File)
October 04, 2019 - 4:30 am
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Samsung Electronics said Friday it has ended the production of smartphones in its last factory in China. Production at the factory in southern China’s Huizhou ended last month, the company said in an email Friday. It said it made “the difficult decision to cease operations...
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Italian ham is put on display in a deli in Rome, Thursday, Oct. 3, 2019. The U.S. had prepared for Wednesday's ruling and already drawn up lists of the dozens of goods it would put tariffs on. They include EU cheeses, olives, and whiskey, as well as planes, helicopters and aircraft parts in the case _ though the decision is likely to require fine-tuning of that list if the Trump administration agrees to go for the tariffs. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)
October 03, 2019 - 11:52 pm
BRUSSELS (AP) — The trade wars threatening to push the global economy into recession are entering a new phase, with the United States and European Union escalating a dispute that endangers the world’s biggest trade relationship. After the Trump administration slapped steep tariffs on $7.5 billion...
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October 03, 2019 - 8:45 pm
ST. LOUIS (AP) — Schnuck Markets Inc., one of the Midwest’s largest grocery store chains, will stop selling cigarettes, chewing tobacco and other tobacco products as of Jan. 1. Suburban St. Louis-based Schnucks announced the move Thursday. Schnucks is the largest grocer in the St. Louis area and...
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October 03, 2019 - 8:43 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — HP Inc.’s new CEO has unveiled the company’s latest plan to streamline its operations — one that envisions cutting its workforce by as much as 16% over the next three years. The personal computer and printer maker says it expects to drop 7,000 to 9,000 people from its global...
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