Constitutions

Thailand's Future Forward Party leader Thanathorn Juangroongruangkit, left, poses for media with party members at the headquarters in Bangkok, Thailand, Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2020. Thailand's Constitutional Court acquitted the country's third-biggest political party of seeking the overthrow of the country's constitutional monarchy. The court ruled Tuesday that the Future Forward Party showed no intention of committing the offense, and that the complaint had not been filed according to the correct legal procedure. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
January 21, 2020 - 1:15 am
BANGKOK (AP) — Thailand's Constitutional Court on Tuesday acquitted the country's third-biggest political party of seeking the overthrow of the country's constitutional monarchy, a case that had highlighted ongoing political divisions in the Southeast Asian nation. The court ruled that the Future...
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Russian President Vladimir Putin, right, and New Russian Prime Minister Mikhail Mishustin attend a Security Council meeting at the Novo-Ogaryovo residence outside Moscow in Moscow, Russia, Monday, Jan. 20, 2020. (Mikhail Klimentyev, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)
January 20, 2020 - 11:21 am
MOSCOW (AP) — Russian President Vladimir Putin on Monday submitted to parliament a package of constitutional amendments widely seen as an attempt to secure his grip on power well after his current term ends in 2024. Putin first presented the proposed changes in his state-of-the-nation address...
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This July 31, 2019 photo shows Stillwater Christian School parents Jeri Anderson and Kendra Espinoza at Woodland Park in Kalispell, Mont. The Supreme Court will hear arguments Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2020 in a dispute over a Montana scholarship program for private K-12 education that also makes donors eligible for up to $150 in state tax credits. Advocates on both sides say the outcome could be momentous because it could lead to efforts in other states to funnel taxpayer money to religious schools. (Casey Kreider/The Daily Inter Lake via AP)
January 18, 2020 - 10:19 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A Supreme Court that seems more favorable to religion-based discrimination claims is set to hear a case that could make it easier to use public money to pay for religious schooling in many states. The justices will hear arguments Wednesday in a dispute over a Montana scholarship...
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President Vladimir Putin attends a wreath laying commemoration ceremony for the 77th anniversary since the Leningrad siege was lifted during the World War Two at the Boundary Stone monument, around 50 kilometers east of St.Petersburg, Russia, Saturday, Jan. 18, 2020. (Alexei Danichev, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)
January 18, 2020 - 9:52 am
MOSCOW (AP) — Russian President Vladimir Putin played it differently this time. Instead of openly declaring plans to extend his rule like he did in 2011, Putin proposed constitutional amendments to appear to give more power to Russia's parliament. Instead of announcing the move as a fait accompli,...
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FILE - In this Oct. 10, 2017, file photo, the Supreme Court in Washington, at sunset. A Supreme Court that seems more favorable to religion-based discrimination claims is set to hear a case that could make it easier to use public money to pay for religious schooling in many states. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
January 18, 2020 - 8:21 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A Supreme Court that seems more favorable to religion-based discrimination claims is set to hear a case that could make it easier to use public money to pay for religious schooling in many states. The justices will hear arguments Wednesday in a dispute over a Montana scholarship...
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FILE - In this file photo taken on Jan. 16, 2020, Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a meeting on drafting constitutional changes at the Novo-Ogaryovo residence outside Moscow, Russia. Instead of openly declaring plans to extend his rule, like he did in 2011, he proposed constitutional amendments to appear to give more power to Russia's parliament. (Mikhail Klimentyev, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP, File)
January 18, 2020 - 2:53 am
MOSCOW (AP) — Russian President Vladimir Putin played it differently this time. Instead of openly declaring plans to extend his rule like he did in 2011, Putin proposed constitutional amendments to appear to give more power to Russia's parliament. Instead of announcing the move as a fait accompli,...
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In this image from video, presiding officer Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts swears in members of the Senate for the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 16, 2020. (Senate Television via AP)
January 16, 2020 - 10:11 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Senate opened the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump with quiet ceremony Thursday — senators standing at their desks to swear an oath of “impartial justice” as jurors, House prosecutors formally reciting the charges and Chief Justice John Roberts presiding. The...
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In this image from video, presiding officer Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts swears in members of the Senate for the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 16, 2020. (Senate Television via AP)
January 16, 2020 - 6:50 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Senate opened the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump with quiet ceremony Thursday — senators standing at their desks to swear an oath of “impartial justice” as jurors, House prosecutors formally reciting the charges and Chief Justice John Roberts presiding. The...
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In this image from video, presiding officer Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts swears in members of the Senate for the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 16, 2020. (Senate Television via AP)
January 16, 2020 - 5:21 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Senate opened the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump with quiet ceremony Thursday — senators standing at their desks to swear an oath of “impartial justice” as jurors, House prosecutors formally reciting the charges and Chief Justice John Roberts presiding. The...
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In this image from video, presiding officer Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts swears in members of the Senate for the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 16, 2020. (Senate Television via AP)
January 16, 2020 - 4:31 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Senate opened the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump with quiet ceremony Thursday, senators standing at their desks to swear an oath of “impartial justice” as jurors on the president's fate. House prosecutors recited the charges, and Chief Justice John Roberts...
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