Constitutional amendments

Sri Lankan Prime Minister Mahinda Rajapaksa greets supporters following his election victory in the general election at his residence in Tangalle, Sri Lanka, Friday, Aug. 7, 2020. The country's powerful Rajapaksa brothers secured a landslide victory in the parliamentary election, giving them nearly the two-thirds majority of seats required to make constitutional changes, according to results released Friday. Rajapaksa is likely to be sworn in the same position by his younger brother, President Gotabaya Rajapaksa, after the vote that could strengthen dynastic rule in the Indian Ocean island nation. (AP Photo/Eranga Jayawardena)
August 07, 2020 - 3:30 am
COLOMBO, Sri Lanka (AP) — Sri Lanka’s powerful Rajapaksa brothers secured a landslide victory in the parliamentary election, giving them nearly the two-thirds majority of seats required to make constitutional changes, according to results released Friday. Prime Minister Mahinda Rajapaksa is likely...
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August 05, 2020 - 11:57 am
DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds said she will sign an executive order Wednesday granting convicted felons the right to vote, ending Iowa’s place as the only remaining state to broadly deny voting rights to felons. The Republican governor promised in June that she would take such...
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FILE - In this Aug. 11, 2019, file photo, Mahinda Rajapaksa, left, and his brother Gotabaya Rajapaksa wave to supporters during a party convention held to announce the presidential candidacy in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Sri Lanka’s powerful, popular Rajapaksa brothers are likely to get strong support in parliamentary elections Wednesday that could add to their family political dynasty and their ability to amend the constitution. The prospect of those changes raise fears of weakening government institutions and the rule of law. The results of the vote could also lead to sibling rivalry, charting the country into more confusion, analysts say.. (AP Photo/Eranga Jayawardena, File)
August 03, 2020 - 8:26 pm
COLOMBO, Sri Lanka (AP) — Sri Lanka’s powerful, popular Rajapaksa brothers are likely to get strong support in parliamentary elections Wednesday that could add to their family political dynasty and their ability to amend the constitution – a prospect raising fears of weakening government...
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Irina, right, and Anastasia Lagutenko play with their son, Dorian, at a playground in St. Petersburg, Russia, July 2, 2020. Their 2017 wedding wasn’t legally recognized in Russia. Any hopes they could someday officially be married in their homeland vanished July 1 when voters approved a package of constitutional amendments, one of which stipulates that marriage in Russia is only between a man and a woman. (AP Photo)
July 13, 2020 - 2:29 am
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia (AP) — At the Lagutenko wedding in 2017, the couple exchanged vows, rings and kisses in front of friends and relatives, then took a traditional drive in a limousine, stopping at landmarks for photos. But because they were both women, the wedding wasn’t legal in Russia. If...
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Honor guard members from the Mississippi National Guard practice folding the former Mississippi flag before a ceremony to retire the banner on Wednesday, July 1, 2020, inside the state Capitol in Jackson. The ceremony happened a day after Republican Gov. Tate Reeves signed a law that removed the flag's official status as a state symbol. The 126-year-old banner was the last state flag in the U.S. with the Confederate battle emblem. (AP Photo/Emily Wagster Pettus)
July 04, 2020 - 8:10 am
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Mississippi just ditched its Confederate-themed state flag. Later this year, the state's voters will decide whether to dump a statewide election process that dates to the Jim Crow era. Facing pressure from a lawsuit and the possibility of action from a federal judge,...
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Russian President Vladimir Putin chairs a meeting with members of working group to prepare proposals on amending the Russian Constitution via teleconference in Moscow, Russia, Friday, July 3, 2020. Almost 78% of voters in Russia have approved amendments to the country's constitution that will allow President Vladimir Putin to stay in power until 2036, Russian election officials said Thursday after all the votes were counted. Kremlin critics said the vote was rigged. (Alexei Druzhinin, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)
July 03, 2020 - 9:50 am
MOSCOW (AP) — President Vladimir Putin on Friday ordered amendments that would allow him to remain in power until 2036 to be put into the Russian Constitution after voters approved the changes during a week-long plebiscite. “The amendments come into force. They come into force, without overstating...
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Ella Pamfilova, head of Russian Central Election Commission, wearing a face mask and gloves to protect against coronavirus, center left, gestures while speaking at a news conference in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, July 2, 2020. Almost 78% of voters in Russia have approved amendments to the country's constitution that will allow President Vladimir Putin to stay in power until 2036, Russian election officials said Thursday after all the votes were counted. Kremlin critics said the vote was rigged. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)
July 02, 2020 - 11:49 am
MOSCOW (AP) — A vote that cleared the way for President Vladimir Putin to rule Russia until 2036 was denounced Thursday by his political opponents as a “Pyrrhic victory” that will only further erode his support and legitimacy. Putin himself thanked voters for their “support and trust,” and repeated...
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Russian President Vladimir Putin shows his passport to a member of an election commission as he arrives to take part in voting at a polling station in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, July 1, 2020. The vote on the constitutional amendments that would reset the clock on Russian President Vladimir Putin's tenure and enable him to serve two more six-year terms is set to wrap up Wednesday. (Alexei Druzhinin, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)
July 01, 2020 - 4:54 pm
MOSCOW (AP) — Russian voters approved changes to the constitution that will allow President Vladimir Putin to potentially hold power until 2036, but the weeklong plebiscite that concluded Wednesday was tarnished by widespread reports of pressure on voters and other irregularities. With three-...
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FILE - In this Oct. 24, 2019, file photo, supporters of Yes on 802 Oklahomans Decide Healthcare, calling for Medicaid expansion to be put on the ballot, carry boxes of petitions into the office of the Oklahoma Secretary of State in Oklahoma City. Oklahoma voters will decide Tuesday, June 30, 2020, whether to expand Medicaid to tens of thousands of low-income residents and become the first state to amend their Constitution to do so. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)
June 30, 2020 - 9:04 am
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Oklahoma voters are deciding Tuesday whether to expand Medicaid to tens of thousands of low-income residents and become the first state to amend their Constitution to do so. While an increasing number of Oklahoma voters took advantage of mail-in voting for Tuesday's primary,...
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FILE - In this March 6, 2018, file photo, Russian President Vladimir Putin listens to employees of Uralvagonzavod factory in Nizhny Tagil, Russia. In 2011, Nizhny Tagil - an industrial city some 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow - was nicknamed “Putingrad” for its residents' fervent support of the president. Now, however, workers who once defended Putin are speaking out against the constitutional reforms that would allow him to stay in office until 2036. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko, File)
June 30, 2020 - 7:51 am
NIZHNY TAGIL, Russia (AP) — In 2011, the industrial city of Nizhny Tagil was dubbed “Putingrad” for its residents’ fervent support for Russian President Vladimir Putin. Nine years later, it appears the city 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Moscow no longer lives up to that nickname. Workers are...
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