Conservation laws and regulations

FILE - This undated file photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows a side view of a recently emerged adult female western glacier stonefly from below Grinnell Glacier in Glacier National Park, Mont. The continued existence of two species of insects is in doubt because climate change is melting away the glaciers and year-round snowfields they depend on, U.S. wildlife officials said Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2019. The western glacier stonefly and the meltwater lednian stonefly found in the northern Rocky Mountains will be protected as threatened species under the federal Endangered Species Act. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials said. (Joe Giersch/U.S. Geological Survey via AP, File)
November 20, 2019 - 7:09 pm
HELENA, Mont. (AP) — The continued existence of two species of insects is in doubt because climate change is melting away the glaciers and year-round snowfields they depend on, U.S. wildlife officials said Wednesday. The western glacier stonefly and the meltwater lednian stonefly found in the...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows a side view of a recently emerged adult female western glacier stonefly from below Grinnell Glacier in Glacier National Park, Mont. The continued existence of two species of insects is in doubt because climate change is melting away the glaciers and year-round snowfields they depend on, U.S. wildlife officials said Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2019. The western glacier stonefly and the meltwater lednian stonefly found in the northern Rocky Mountains will be protected as threatened species under the federal Endangered Species Act. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials said. (Joe Giersch/U.S. Geological Survey via AP, File)
November 20, 2019 - 6:41 pm
HELENA, Mont. (AP) — The continued existence of two species of insects is in doubt because climate change is melting away the glaciers and year-round snowfields they depend on, U.S. wildlife officials said Wednesday. The western glacier stonefly and the meltwater lednian stonefly found in the...
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In this May 7, 2019, photo released by Cannabis Removal on Public Lands (CROP) Project, a group including U.S. Forest Service rangers, scientists and conservationists work to reclaim a so-called trespass grow site where nearly 9,000 cannabis plants were illegally cultivated. Authorities allege members of an international drug trafficking ring set up camp at the site months earlier. (Jackee Riccio/CROP via AP)
November 17, 2019 - 1:18 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Two months after two men were arrested at an illicit marijuana farm on public land deep in the Northern California wilderness, authorities are assessing the environmental impact and cleanup costs at the site where trees were clear-cut, waterways were diverted, and the ground was...
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November 17, 2019 - 11:21 am
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A month after two men were arrested at an illicit marijuana farm on public land deep in the Northern California wilderness, authorities are assessing the environmental impact and cleanup costs at the site where trees were clear-cut, waterways were diverted, and the ground was...
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November 17, 2019 - 10:53 am
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A month after two men were arrested at an illicit marijuana farm on public land deep in the Northern California wilderness, authorities are assessing the environmental impact and cleanup costs at the site where trees were clear-cut, waterways were diverted, and the ground was...
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This September 2019 photo provided by the New York Department of Environmental Conservation shows a brook trout caught by biologists from a tributary to Lake Colden near Keene, N.Y. In 2019, biologists confirmed a healthy population of brook trout were reproducing in the high altitude lake for the first time since acid rain rendered it unable to support fish 32 years earlier.(NY Department of Environmental Conservation via AP)
October 08, 2019 - 1:12 pm
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — A reproducing population of brook trout has been discovered in a tiny lake in the Adirondack High Peaks Wilderness for the first time since the lake was declared fishless because of acid rain 32 years ago, New York state officials said. Department of Environmental Conservation...
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This September 2019 photo provided by the New York Department of Environmental Conservation shows a brook trout caught by biologists at Lake Colden near Keene, N.Y. In 2019, biologists confirmed a healthy population of brook trout were reproducing in the high altitude lake for the first time since acid rain rendered it unable to support fish 32 years earlier. (NY Department of Environmental Conservation via AP)
October 08, 2019 - 12:38 pm
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — A reproducing population of brook trout has been discovered in a tiny lake in the Adirondack High Peaks Wilderness for the first time since the lake was declared fishless because of acid rain 32 years ago, New York state officials said. Department of Environmental Conservation...
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October 08, 2019 - 3:05 am
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Brook trout have been discovered in a high-elevation Adirondack Mountain lake for the first time since the lake was declared fishless due to acid rain 32 years ago. The Department of Environmental Conservation says the breeding population of trout in Lake Colden in the High...
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September 25, 2019 - 3:11 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Seventeen states are suing to block Trump administration rules weakening the Endangered Species Act. The lawsuit, filed Wednesday in federal court in San Francisco, follows a similar challenge filed last month by several environmental groups, including the Humane Society and the...
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This undated photo provided by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife shows a Paiute cutthroat trout. For the first time in nearly a century, the California trout species will swim in a mountain creek that is its native habitat, marking a major milestone that conservationists hope will lead to a thriving population and removal of its threatened status. About 30 Paiute cutthroat trout will be plucked Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2019 from Coyote Valley Creek and hauled in cans strapped to pack mules about two miles (3.2 kilometers) to be dumped back into a stretch Silver King Creek in Alpine County's Long Valley, where the shimmering species glided through the cold water for thousands of years. (California Department of Fish and Wildlife via AP)
September 18, 2019 - 11:02 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — For the first time in nearly a century, a rare California trout species is swimming in a mountain creek that is its native habitat, marking a major milestone that conservationists hope will lead to a thriving population and removal of its threatened status. About 30 Paiute...
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