Climatology

Kevin Tovornik exits his travel camper located in the back yard of his home damaged by flooding from Hurricane Florence near the Crabtree Swamp Friday, Feb. 1, 2019, in Conway, S.C. Tovornik lost his air conditioner and duct work in the 2016 flood. In 2018, he saved his furniture, but still ended up losing the house.
February 16, 2019 - 9:50 am
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — When he took the job 15 years ago, Horry County Emergency Manager Randy Webster figured his biggest disasters would be wind and surge rolling over his county's beaches, South Carolina's top tourist destination. Instead, his worries have shifted inland, where rivers overflowing...
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FILE - In this Feb. 8, 2019, photo, former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg answers an question during an interview with The Associated Press in Orlando, Fla. Bloomberg measures his progress on climate change in metric tons. His political party, it seems, prefers big ideas. Many Democratic presidential contenders embraced the “Green New Deal” immediately after it was released last week. (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack)
February 13, 2019 - 9:34 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic presidential prospect Michael Bloomberg is promoting a new documentary film on climate change, but the billionaire philanthropist says the one person he thinks should see it most — President Donald Trump — likely never will because "it won't be running on Fox." "The...
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FILE - In this Feb. 8, 2019, photo, former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg answers an question during an interview with The Associated Press in Orlando, Fla. Bloomberg measures his progress on climate change in metric tons. His political party, it seems, prefers big ideas. Many Democratic presidential contenders embraced the “Green New Deal” immediately after it was released last week. (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack)
February 13, 2019 - 8:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic presidential prospect Michael Bloomberg is criticizing President Donald Trump for ignoring his administration's climate scientists and failing to take action to address climate change. The former New York City mayor made the remarks Wednesday at a showing of a movie he...
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FI LE - In this June 17, 2018, file photo, man fishes from the Battery City Park esplanade as temperature edge near 90 degrees in New York. The weather in New York City in a few decades will feel like how Arkansas is now. Chicago will seem like Kansas City and San Francisco will get a Southern California climate if global warming pollution continues at the current pace, a new study finds. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)
February 12, 2019 - 4:26 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The climate in New York City in 60 years could feel like Arkansas now. Chicago could seem like Kansas City and San Francisco could get a Southern California climate if global warming pollution continues at the current pace, a new study finds. In 2080, North Carolina's capital,...
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FI LE - In this June 17, 2018, file photo, man fishes from the Battery City Park esplanade as temperature edge near 90 degrees in New York. The weather in New York City in a few decades will feel like how Arkansas is now. Chicago will seem like Kansas City and San Francisco will get a Southern California climate if global warming pollution continues at the current pace, a new study finds. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)
February 12, 2019 - 12:03 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The climate in New York City in 60 years could feel like Arkansas now. Chicago could seem like Kansas City and San Francisco could get a Southern California climate if global warming pollution continues at the current pace, a new study finds. In 2080, North Carolina's capital,...
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February 12, 2019 - 11:59 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study says the climate in New York City in a few decades could feel like how Arkansas is now. Chicago could seem like Kansas City and San Francisco could get a Southern California climate if global warming pollution continues at the current pace. In 2080, North Carolina's...
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This map made available by NASA in February 2019 shows global surface temperature anomalies for 2014-2018. Higher than normal temperatures are shown in red and lower than normal temperatures are shown in blue. Two U.S. agencies, the United Kingdom Met Office and the World Meteorological Organization analyzed global temperatures in slightly different ways, but each came to the same conclusion on Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2019: 2018 was the fourth-warmest year on record behind 2016, 2015 and 2017. (Kathryn Mersmann/NASA - Scientific Visualization Studio via AP)
February 06, 2019 - 2:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — While 2018 was the fourth-warmest year on record, British meteorologists are predicting the next five years will be much hotter, maybe even record-breaking. Two U.S. agencies, the United Kingdom Met Office and the World Meteorological Organization analyzed global temperatures in...
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This map made available by NASA in February 2019 shows global surface temperature anomalies for 2014-2018. Higher than normal temperatures are shown in red and lower than normal temperatures are shown in blue. Two U.S. agencies, the United Kingdom Met Office and the World Meteorological Organization analyzed global temperatures in slightly different ways, but each came to the same conclusion on Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2019: 2018 was the fourth-warmest year on record behind 2016, 2015 and 2017. (Kathryn Mersmann/NASA - Scientific Visualization Studio via AP)
February 06, 2019 - 2:27 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — While 2018 was the fourth-warmest year on record, British meteorologists are predicting the next five years will be much hotter, maybe even record-breaking. Two U.S. agencies, the United Kingdom Met Office and the World Meteorological Organization analyzed global temperatures in...
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FILE - In this Monday, Feb. 22, 2016 file photo, trekkers pass through a glacier at the Mount Everest base camp, Nepal. One-third of Himalayan glaciers will melt by the end of the century due to climate change, threatening water sources for 1.9 billion people, even if current efforts to reduce climate change succeed, according to an assessment released Monday, Feb. 4, 2019. by the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development. (AP Photo/Tashi Sherpa, file)
February 05, 2019 - 7:39 pm
KATHMANDU, Nepal (AP) — One-third of Himalayan glaciers will melt by the end of the century due to climate change, threatening water sources for 1.9 billion people, even if current efforts to reduce climate change succeed, an assessment warns. If global efforts to curb climate change fail, the...
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FILE - In this Monday, Feb. 22, 2016 file photo, trekkers pass through a glacier at the Mount Everest base camp, Nepal. One-third of Himalayan glaciers will melt by the end of the century due to climate change, threatening water sources for 1.9 billion people, even if current efforts to reduce climate change succeed, according to an assessment released Monday, Feb. 4, 2019. by the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development. (AP Photo/Tashi Sherpa, file)
February 05, 2019 - 2:21 am
KATHMANDU, Nepal (AP) — One-third of Himalayan glaciers will melt by the end of the century due to climate change, threatening water sources for 1.9 billion people, even if current efforts to reduce climate change succeed, an assessment warns. If global efforts to curb climate change fail, the...
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