Botany

This July 2018, photo provided by Charlotte Murphy shows poison parsnip in Bennington, Vt. Murphy was left with severe burns and blisters on her legs after encountering the invasive species of plant in Vermont. (Charlotte Murphy via AP)
July 18, 2018 - 7:09 pm
ESSEX, Vt. (AP) — A woman was left with severe burns and blisters on her legs after encountering an invasive species of plant in Vermont. Charlotte Murphy says she developed painful blisters overnight after brushing against poison parsnip. Murphy says the blisters got so bad she had to go to the...
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July 18, 2018 - 11:19 am
ESSEX, Vt. (AP) — A woman was left with severe burns and blisters on her legs after encountering an invasive species of plant in Vermont. Charlotte Murphy says she developed painful blisters overnight after brushing against poison parsnip. Murphy says the blisters got so bad she had to go to the...
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In this photo taken Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017, a woman and child walks alongside a giant baobab tree in Chimanimani, Zimbabwe. Africa's ancient baobab, with it's distinctive swollen trunk and known as the "tree of life," is under a new mysterious threat, with some of the largest and oldest dying abruptly in recent years. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)
July 12, 2018 - 6:43 am
CROOKS CORNER, South Africa (AP) — Africa's ancient baobab, with its distinctive swollen trunk and known as the "tree of life," is under a new and mysterious threat, with some of the largest and oldest dying abruptly in recent years. Nine of the 13 oldest baobabs, aged between 1,000 and 2,500 years...
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Save The Redwoods League board member John Montague, left, is joined by Todd McMahon, vice president of NCRM Inc., an environmental consulting firm that helps manage League projects and writer Glen Martin as they stand among the mature redwoods of Harold Richardson Redwoods Reserve in Stewarts Point, Calif., March 28, 2018. The grove in Northern California with hundreds of ancient redwood trees, some taller than the Statue of Liberty, is being acquired by environmental group Save the Redwoods League that plans to preserve it and open a new public park, the group announced Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Mike Shoys/Save the Redwoods League via AP)
June 26, 2018 - 8:32 pm
STEWARTS POINT, Calif. (AP) — An environmental group said Tuesday that it is acquiring a grove in Northern California with hundreds of ancient redwood trees, some taller than the Statue of Liberty, and is planning to preserve it and open a public park. Save the Redwoods League said it is purchasing...
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This undated photo provided by Rich Hatfield shows a western bumble bee (Bombus occidentalis) lands on Canada goldenrod. The Pacific Northwest Bumble Bee Atlas for Idaho, Oregon and Washington that started this month aims to accumulate detailed information about bumblebees with the help of hundreds of citizen scientists spreading out across the three states. (Rich Hatfield/The Xerces Society via AP)
June 17, 2018 - 12:38 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Hundreds of citizen scientists have begun buzzing through locations across the Pacific Northeast seeking a better understanding about nearly 30 bumblebee species. Bumblebees, experts say, are important pollinators for both wild and agricultural plants, but some species have...
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February 25, 2018 - 10:57 am
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — A group of scientists says beech trees are dominating the woodlands of the northeastern United States as the climate changes, and that could be bad news for forests. The scientists are from the University of Maine and Indiana's Purdue University and say the move toward beech-...
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FILE- In this October 2017 file photo, a black bear walks in Granite Basin, amid low-lying blueberry thickets, in Juneau, Alaska. A study of bears and berries has determined that the big animals are the main dispersers of fruit seeds in southeast Alaska. The study by Oregon State University researchers says it's the first instance of a temperate plant being primarily dispersed by mammals through their excrement rather than by birds. (AP Photo/Becky Bohrer)
February 17, 2018 - 1:20 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Does a bear leave scat in the woods? The answer is obvious but the effects on an ecosystem may not be. A study by Oregon State University researchers concludes that brown and black bears, and not birds, as commonly thought, are primary distributers of small fruit seeds in...
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In this 2014 image from a remote camera trap provided by Taal Levi, a black bear eats devil's club berries near Haines, Alaska. A study of bears and berries has determined that the big animals are the main dispersers of fruit seeds in southeast Alaska. The study by Oregon State University researchers says it's the first instance of a temperate plant being primarily dispersed by mammals through their excrement rather than by birds. (Taal Levi and Laurie Harrer via AP)
February 17, 2018 - 12:12 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Does a bear scat in the woods? The answer is obvious but the effects on an ecosystem may not be. A study by Oregon State University researchers concludes that brown and black bears, and not birds, as commonly thought, are primary distributers of small fruit seeds in...
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