Biomedical research services

FILE - In this Sept. 25, 2019, file photo, a sign at an entrance to Tufts School of Medicine, in Boston, identifies the address as the Arthur M. Sackler Center for Medical Education. Tufts announced Thursday, Dec. 5, it will strip the Sackler name from all of its institutions. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)
December 05, 2019 - 2:27 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Tufts University is cutting ties with the billionaire family that owns OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma, saying it will strip the Sackler name from its campus and accept no further donations amid concerns over the family's role in the opioid crisis. University officials announced the...
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FILE - In this Sept. 25, 2019, file photo, a sign at an entrance to Tufts School of Medicine, in Boston, identifies the address as the Arthur M. Sackler Center for Medical Education. Tufts announced Thursday, Dec. 5, it will strip the Sackler name from all of its institutions. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)
December 05, 2019 - 1:06 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Tufts University is cutting ties with the billionaire family that owns OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma, saying it will strip the Sackler name from its campus and accept no further donations amid concerns over the family's role in the opioid crisis. University officials announced the...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, July 15, 2015 file photo, a lesbian couple holds hands in Salt Lake City. Released on Thursday, Aug. 29, 2019, the largest study of its kind found new evidence that genes contribute to same-sex sexual behavior, echoing research that says there is no single “gay gene.” (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
August 29, 2019 - 2:22 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — The largest study of its kind found new evidence that genes contribute to same-sex sexual behavior, but it echoes research that says there are no specific genes that make people gay. The genome-wide research on DNA from nearly half a million U.S. and U.K. adults identified five...
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August 29, 2019 - 2:10 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — The largest study of its kind found new evidence that genes contribute to same-sex sexual behavior, but it echoes research that says there are no specific genes that make people gay. The genome-wide research on DNA from nearly half a million U.S. and U.K. adults identified five...
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In this May 13, 2019, photo, Bella the vervet monkey looks at the camera at Primates Inc., in Westfield, Wis. Besides Bella, previously a pet, the sanctuary has five rhesus macaque monkeys that were previously used in medical research. More research labs are retiring primates to sanctuaries like Primates Inc., a 17-acre rural compound in central Wisconsin, where they can live their remaining years after research studies are done, according to sanctuaries and researchers. (AP Photo/Carrie Antlfinger)
June 13, 2019 - 7:45 am
WESTFIELD, Wis. (AP) — Izzle, Timon, Batman, River and Mars spent years confined inside a lab, their lives devoted to being tested for the benefit of human health. But these rhesus macaques have paid their dues and are now living in retirement — in larger enclosures that let them venture outside,...
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In this May 13, 2019, photo, Bella the vervet monkey looks at the camera at Primates Inc., in Westfield, Wis. Besides Bella, previously a pet, the sanctuary has five rhesus macaque monkeys that were previously used in medical research. More research labs are retiring primates to sanctuaries like Primates Inc., a 17-acre rural compound in central Wisconsin, where they can live their remaining years after research studies are done, according to sanctuaries and researchers. (AP Photo/Carrie Antlfinger)
June 13, 2019 - 3:37 am
WESTFIELD, Wis. (AP) — Izzle, Timon, Batman, River and Mars spent years confined to inside of a lab, their lives devoted to being tested for the benefit of human health. But these rhesus macaques have paid their dues and are now living in retirement — in larger enclosures that let them venture...
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FILE - In this Aug. 17, 2009 file photo, Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, at NIH headquarters in Bethesda, Md. The Trump administration is ending the medical research by government scientists using human fetal tissue. Officials said Wednesday government-funded research by universities will be allowed to continue, subject to additional scrutiny. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
June 05, 2019 - 9:03 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration said Wednesday that it is ending medical research by government scientists that uses human fetal tissue,. The Health and Human Services Department said in a statement that government-funded research by universities that involves fetal tissue can continue...
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This undated photo provided by the National Cancer Institute shows Dr. Steven A. Rosenberg, M.D., Ph.D., winner of the 2018 Albany Medical Center's Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research. (Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute via AP)
August 15, 2018 - 8:37 am
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Tumors once considered untreatable have disappeared and people previously given months to live are surviving for decades thanks to new therapies emerging from the work of three scientists chosen to receive a $500,000 medical prize. The recipients of the annual Albany Medical...
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This undated photo provided by the National Cancer Institute shows Dr. Steven A. Rosenberg, M.D., Ph.D., winner of the 2018 Albany Medical Center's Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research. (Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute via AP)
August 15, 2018 - 8:34 am
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Three scientists will share a $500,000 medical prize for their studies of the immune system that have led to innovative treatments for cancer, HIV and other diseases. The recipients of the annual Albany Medical Center Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research were announced...
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This June 2017 family photo shows Pete Canfield, of Spokane, Wash., in Newport Beach, Calif. In April 2017, he had an experimental stem cell treatment at a Scottsdale, Ariz. clinic for chronic lung disease. His GoFundMe campaign had few donors, so he paid most of the $6,000 cost himself. He said the treatment did not work and his disease has progressed. (Courtesy Pete Canfield via AP)
May 08, 2018 - 1:22 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — They're the tech-age version of donor jars at the diner: crowdfunding websites that aim to link ailing people with strangers willing to help pay for medical treatment. But new research suggests duped patients sometimes crowdfund to pay for bogus stem cell treatments. A study...
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