Biology

FILE - In this July 8, 2017 file photo, journalists and World Wildlife Fund employees and volunteers stand before papier mache replicas of the critically endangered porpoise known as the "vaquita marina" during an event in front of the National Palace calling on the Mexican government to take additional steps to protect the world's smallest marine mammal, in Mexico City. Experts said Wednesday, March 6, 2019 that only 22 "vaquitas" remain in the Gulf of California, where a grim, increasingly violent battle is playing out between emboldened fishermen and the last line of defense for the smallest and most endangered porpoise in the world. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell, File)
March 06, 2019 - 8:38 pm
MEXICO CITY (AP) — Experts said Wednesday that at most only 22 vaquitas remain in the Gulf of California, where a grim, increasingly violent battle is playing out between emboldened fishermen and the last line of defense for the smallest and most endangered porpoise in the world. Jorge Urban, a...
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Timothy Ray Brown poses for a photograph, Monday, March 4, 2019, in Seattle. Brown, also known as the "Berlin patient," was the first person to be cured of HIV infection, more than a decade ago. Now researchers are reporting a second patient has lived 18 months after stopping HIV treatment without sign of the virus following a stem-cell transplant. But such transplants are dangerous, cannot be used widely and have failed in other patients. (AP Photo/Manuel Valdes)
March 05, 2019 - 6:00 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — A London man appears to be free of the virus that causes AIDS after a stem cell transplant, the second success including the "Berlin patient," doctors reported. The therapy had an early success with Timothy Ray Brown, a U.S. man treated in Germany who is 12 years post-transplant and...
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Timothy Ray Brown poses for a photograph, Monday, March 4, 2019, in Seattle. Brown, also known as the "Berlin patient," was the first person to be cured of HIV infection, more than a decade ago. Now researchers are reporting a second patient has lived 18 months after stopping HIV treatment without sign of the virus following a stem-cell transplant. But such transplants are dangerous, cannot be used widely and have failed in other patients. (AP Photo/Manuel Valdes)
March 05, 2019 - 5:16 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — A London man appears to be free of the virus that causes AIDS after a stem cell transplant, the second success including the "Berlin patient," doctors reported. The therapy had an early success with Timothy Ray Brown, a U.S. man treated in Germany who is 12 years post-transplant and...
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Timothy Ray Brown poses for a photograph, Monday, March 4, 2019, in Seattle. Brown, also known as the "Berlin patient," was the first person to be cured of HIV infection, more than a decade ago. Now researchers are reporting a second patient has lived 18 months after stopping HIV treatment without sign of the virus following a stem-cell transplant. But such transplants are dangerous, cannot be used widely and have failed in other patients. (AP Photo/Manuel Valdes)
March 05, 2019 - 5:13 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — A London man appears to be free of the virus that causes AIDS after a stem cell transplant, the second success including the "Berlin patient," doctors reported. The therapy had an early success with Timothy Ray Brown, a U.S. man treated in Germany who is 12 years post-transplant and...
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Timothy Ray Brown poses for a photograph, Monday, March 4, 2019, in Seattle. Brown, also known as the "Berlin patient," was the first person to be cured of HIV infection, more than a decade ago. Now researchers are reporting a second patient has lived 18 months after stopping HIV treatment without sign of the virus following a stem-cell transplant. But such transplants are dangerous, cannot be used widely and have failed in other patients. (AP Photo/Manuel Valdes)
March 05, 2019 - 4:44 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — A London man appears to be free of the virus that causes AIDS after a stem cell transplant, the second success including the "Berlin patient," doctors reported. The therapy had an early success with Timothy Ray Brown, a U.S. man treated in Germany who is 12 years post-transplant and...
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Timothy Ray Brown poses for a photograph, Monday, March 4, 2019, in Seattle. Brown, also known as the "Berlin patient," was the first person to be cured of HIV infection, more than a decade ago. Now researchers are reporting a second patient has lived 18 months after stopping HIV treatment without sign of the virus following a stem-cell transplant. But such transplants are dangerous, cannot be used widely and have failed in other patients. (AP Photo/Manuel Valdes)
March 05, 2019 - 6:02 am
SEATTLE (AP) — A London man appears to be free of the AIDS virus after a stem cell transplant, the second success including the "Berlin patient," doctors reported. The therapy had an early success with Timothy Ray Brown, a U.S. man treated in Germany who is 12 years post-transplant and still free...
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Timothy Ray Brown poses for a photograph, Monday, March 4, 2019, in Seattle. Brown, also known as the "Berlin patient," was the first person to be cured of HIV infection, more than a decade ago. Now researchers are reporting a second patient has lived 18 months after stopping HIV treatment without sign of the virus following a stem-cell transplant. But such transplants are dangerous, cannot be used widely and have failed in other patients. (AP Photo/Manuel Valdes)
March 04, 2019 - 8:27 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Researchers say a London man appears to be free of the AIDS virus after a stem cell transplant. It's the second such success including "Berlin patient" Timothy Ray Brown. Such transplants are dangerous and have failed in other patients. The new findings were published online Monday...
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March 04, 2019 - 7:25 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Researchers say a London man appears to be free of the AIDS virus after a stem cell transplant. It's the second such success since "Berlin patient" Timothy Ray Brown more than a decade ago. Such transplants are dangerous and have failed in other patients. The new findings were...
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A scientist at the NY Genome Center in New York demonstrates equipment used in single-cell RNA analysis on Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2018. Until recently, trying to study key traits of cells from people and other animals often meant analyzing bulk samples of tissue, producing an average of results from many cell types. But scientists have developed techniques that let them directly study the DNA codes, and its chemical cousin RNA, the activity of genes and other traits of individual cells. (AP Photo/Malcolm Ritter)
March 04, 2019 - 6:29 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Did you hear what happened when Bill Gates walked into a bar? Everybody there immediately became millionaires — on average. That joke about a very rich man is an old one among statisticians. So why did Peter Smibert use it to explain a revolution in biology? Because it shows...
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A scientist at the NY Genome Center in New York demonstrates equipment used in single-cell RNA analysis on Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2018. Until recently, trying to study key traits of cells from people and other animals often meant analyzing bulk samples of tissue, producing an average of results from many cell types. But scientists have developed techniques that let them directly study the DNA codes, and its chemical cousin RNA, the activity of genes and other traits of individual cells. (AP Photo/Malcolm Ritter)
March 04, 2019 - 1:14 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Did you hear what happened when Bill Gates walked into a bar? Everybody there immediately became millionaires — on average. That joke about a very rich man is an old one among statisticians. So why did Peter Smibert use it to explain a revolution in biology? Because it shows...
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