Biology

FILE - In this June 7, 2017, file photo, two wild elephants, part of a herd that arrived at a wetland near the Thakurkuchi railway station engage in a tussle on the outskirts of Gauhati, Assam, India. Development that’s led to loss of habitat, climate change, overfishing, pollution and invasive species is causing a biodiversity crisis, scientists say in a new United Nations science report released Monday, May 6, 2019. (AP Photo/ Anupam Nath, File)
May 06, 2019 - 6:41 am
Nature is in more trouble now than at any other time in human history, with extinction looming over 1 million species of plants and animals, scientists said Monday in the United Nations' first comprehensive report on biodiversity. It's all because of humans, but it's not too late to fix the problem...
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Joergen Ree Wiig tries to reach the harness attached to a beluga whale before the Norwegian fishermen were able to removed the tight harness, off the northern Norwegian coast Friday, April 26, 2019. The harness strap which features a mount for an action camera, says "Equipment St. Petersburg" which has prompted speculation that the animal may have escaped from a Russian military facility. (Joergen Ree Wiig/Norwegian Direcorate of Fisheries Sea Surveillance Unit via AP)
April 30, 2019 - 11:51 am
COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — A beluga whale found in Arctic Norway wearing a harness that suggests links to a military facility in Russia is so tame that residents can pet the mammal on its nose. The white whale found frolicking in the frigid harbor of Tufjord, a hamlet near Norway's northernmost...
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Joergen Ree Wiig tries to reach the harness attached to a beluga whale before the Norwegian fishermen were able to removed the tight harness, off the northern Norwegian coast Friday, April 26, 2019. The harness strap which features a mount for an action camera, says "Equipment St. Petersburg" which has prompted speculation that the animal may have escaped from a Russian military facility. (Joergen Ree Wiig/Norwegian Direcorate of Fisheries Sea Surveillance Unit via AP)
April 30, 2019 - 11:12 am
COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — A beluga whale found in Arctic Norway wearing a harness that suggests links to a military facility in Russia is so tame that residents can pet the mammal on its nose. The white whale frolicking in the frigid harbor of Tufjord, a hamlet near Norway's northernmost point,...
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A beluga whale seen as it swims next to a fishing boat before Norwegian fishermen removed the tight harness, swimming off the northern Norwegian coast Friday, April 26, 2019. The harness strap which features a mount for an action camera, says "Equipment St. Petersburg" which has prompted speculation that the animal may have escaped from a Russian military facility. (Joergen Ree Wiig/Norwegian Direcorate of Fisheries Sea Surveillance Unit via AP)
April 29, 2019 - 8:39 am
COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — A beluga whale found with a tight harness that appeared to be Russian made has raised the alarm of Norwegian officials and prompted speculation that the animal may have escaped from a Russian military facility. Joergen Ree Wiig of the Norwegian Directorate of Fisheries...
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A beluga whale seen as it swims next to a fishing boat before Norwegian fishermen removed the tight harness, swimming off the northern Norwegian coast Friday, April 26, 2019. The harness strap which features a mount for an action camera, says "Equipment St. Petersburg" which has prompted speculation that the animal may have escaped from a Russian military facility. (Joergen Ree Wiig/Norwegian Direcorate of Fisheries Sea Surveillance Unit via AP)
April 29, 2019 - 7:10 am
COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — A beluga whale found with a tight harness that appeared to be Russian made has raised the alarm of Norwegian officials and prompted speculation that the animal may have escaped from a Russian military facility. Joergen Ree Wiig of the Norwegian Directorate of Fisheries...
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FILE - This Monday, May 15, 2017, file photo shows Marcus Hutchins, a British cybersecurity expert during an interview in Ilfracombe, England. The British cybersecurity researcher hailed as a hero for credited with stopping a worldwide computer virus in 2017 has pleaded guilty to developing malware to steal banking information. Federal prosecutors in Wisconsin and Hutchins’ attorneys say in a Friday, April 19, 2019 filing that the 24-year-old is pleading guilty to developing the malware and conspiring to distribute it from 2012 to 2015. In exchange for his plea to those two charges, prosecutors are dismissing eight others. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein, File)
April 20, 2019 - 2:16 pm
MILWAUKEE (AP) — A British cybersecurity researcher credited with stopping a worldwide computer virus has pleaded guilty to developing malware to steal banking information. Federal prosecutors in Wisconsin and Marcus Hutchins' attorneys said in a joint court filing Friday that the 24-year-old...
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FILE - This Monday, May 15, 2017, file photo shows Marcus Hutchins, a British cybersecurity expert during an interview in Ilfracombe, England. The British cybersecurity researcher hailed as a hero for credited with stopping a worldwide computer virus in 2017 has pleaded guilty to developing malware to steal banking information. Federal prosecutors in Wisconsin and Hutchins’ attorneys say in a Friday, April 19, 2019 filing that the 24-year-old is pleading guilty to developing the malware and conspiring to distribute it from 2012 to 2015. In exchange for his plea to those two charges, prosecutors are dismissing eight others. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein, File)
April 20, 2019 - 1:05 pm
MILWAUKEE (AP) — A British cybersecurity researcher credited with stopping a worldwide computer virus has pleaded guilty to developing malware to steal banking information. Federal prosecutors in Wisconsin and Marcus Hutchins' attorneys said in a joint court filing Friday that the 24-year-old...
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April 20, 2019 - 11:26 am
MILWAUKEE (AP) — A British cybersecurity researcher credited with stopping a worldwide computer virus in 2017 has pleaded guilty to developing malware to steal banking information. Federal prosecutors in Wisconsin and Marcus Hutchins' attorneys said in a filing Friday that the 24-year-old is...
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Visitors to the Oklahoma City National Memorial walk around the "Survivor Tree," a 100-year-old American elm and symbol of hope after the deadly 1995 bombing, Friday, April 19, 2019, in Oklahoma City. Science and technology are helping Oklahoma City to sustain the DNA of the tree symbolizing hope 24 years after the deadliest act of domestic terrorism on U.S. soil. As part of an annual remembrance of the bombing, civic leaders on Friday plan to transplant a tree that was cloned from the scarred American elm that lived through the blast. They hope the younger elm will replace the "Survivor Tree" once it dies. (AP Photo/Adam Kealoha Causey)
April 19, 2019 - 6:08 pm
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Science and technology are helping Oklahoma City to sustain the DNA — and the spirit — of a tree that has symbolized hope in the 24 years since the deadliest act of domestic terrorism in U.S. history shook the city to its core. As part of an annual remembrance of the bombing,...
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A Survivor Tree clone is transplanted on the grounds Scissortail Park in Oklahoma City, Friday, April 19, 2019. The Survivor Tree is the 110-year-old American Elm that survived the 1995 bombing of Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. (Sarah Phipps/The Oklahoman via AP)
April 19, 2019 - 5:14 pm
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Science and technology are helping Oklahoma City to sustain the DNA — and the spirit — of a tree that has symbolized hope in the 24 years since the deadliest act of domestic terrorism in U.S. history shook the city to its core. As part of an annual remembrance of the bombing,...
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